Steering feel and accuracy improvement

TnWHTMARE

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I’m sure this has been discussed at some point but I find the current search feature almost impossible to use, so I figured I would just start another thread. I’m curious about increasing the steering feel and accuracy on the GT. After having a sixth generation Camaro,the mustangs steering feels less accurate with far less feedback.

However, I have heard that the GT 350 and the GT500 are much better. It is my understanding that they have revised steering geometry via the knuckle (and the other things that I’m sure I am clueless about )and I’m sure either a different power steering rack or different power steering calibrations. I’m wondering if it’s possible to incorporate some of those changes onto the GT to improve the overall steering experience.

 

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It's mainly for lowered cars, but the extended ball joint roll center correction arms are a pretty significant improvement in steering feel and front end response, accompanied with bumpsteer correction. Based on how softly sprung the Camaro is in comparison to the S550, I believe that they have similar resulting geometry designed in.
 

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I don’t think there are any geometry upgrades that will address this. As Brian says, the steeda control arms compensate for geometry on a lowered car, but a stock car has the good geometry from Ford. The steeda control arm just get a lowered car to steer like a stock GT IMHO.

I will say that if you have a base GT,, stiffening the front suspension may help... even using the the bonded front swaybar from a PP car, or a heavier aftermarket swaybars, stiffer aftermarket shocks and/or springs.
 

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(1) Big(ger) front swaybar

(2) If lowered, Steeda’s roll-center correction/bumpsteer kit

Good dampers and better tires never hurt.

Edit: I’ve heard rumors of aluminum knuckles being available, maybe even poached from magnaride GTs with slight modification. Money says these would make huge improvements in feel
 
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Fordohio

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It's mainly for lowered cars, but the extended ball joint roll center correction arms are a pretty significant improvement in steering feel and front end response, accompanied with bumpsteer correction. Based on how softly sprung the Camaro is in comparison to the S550, I believe that they have similar resulting geometry designed in.
How big of deal would it be to not install the bump steer kit when installing the roll center correction arms?
 


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How big of deal would it be to not install the bump steer kit when installing the roll center correction arms?
I wouldn't recommend it. When I've had the kit out of adjustment the steering feels vague yet also has excessive tramlining.
 

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I had the same issue, and I went with Steeda's front control arms, bump steer kit and K-Member brace... All i can say is the steering feels much more mechanical now and gives you a direct feeling to steering where as before it felt numb. If you are experiencing those issues I would highly recommend the front control arms, bump steer kit and k member brace, they should give you exactly what you are looking for. I also upgraded the rear camber arms, vertical links, and toe links and the car as a whole is not hesitant anymore and is much more predictable in turns.
 

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How big of deal would it be to not install the bump steer kit when installing the roll center correction arms?
I did that out of ignorance too. they should only be sold as a kit IMO - so had to go back and retrofit. I'm running the Steeda dual-rate springs. My SS/1LE is still sharper and more 'immediate' and more communicative in feel on the street. But the GT is MUCH closer than it used to be.
 

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I did that out of ignorance too. they should only be sold as a kit IMO - so had to go back and retrofit. I'm running the Steeda dual-rate springs. My SS/1LE is still sharper and more 'immediate' and more communicative in feel on the street. But the GT is MUCH closer than it used to be.
SS 1LE is overall a much better performing car in terms of handling and chassis.
 

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It's mainly for lowered cars, but the extended ball joint roll center correction arms are a pretty significant improvement in steering feel and front end response, accompanied with bumpsteer correction. Based on how softly sprung the Camaro is in comparison to the S550, I believe that they have similar resulting geometry designed in.
At some point I think you have to address the compliances - lateral arm bushings and EPAS mounting come to mind here, as any movements permitted in those locations amount to little vaguenesses between the steering wheel and the contact patches. I'm not sure if there's much room for steering feel improvement in the K-member mounting.

Mildly 'stretching' the tires on wheels wider than "measuring width" also tends to help, assuming that doing so is at least class-legal.

Some years ago I DIY-stiffened the rack bushings on a FWD car that I autocrossed. Too long ago to remember much except that there was *some* improvement.


Norm
 

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At some point I think you have to address the compliances - lateral arm bushings and EPAS mounting come to mind here, as any movements permitted in those locations amount to little vaguenesses between the steering wheel and the contact patches. I'm not sure if there's much room for steering feel improvement in the K-member mounting.

Mildly 'stretching' the tires on wheels wider than "measuring width" also tends to help, assuming that doing so is at least class-legal.

Some years ago I DIY-stiffened the rack bushings on a FWD car that I autocrossed. Too long ago to remember much except that there was *some* improvement.


Norm
Lateral arms on PP cars already have bearing points, though removing the rubber from the tension links also sharpens response and accuracy. Last I looked at the S550 EPAS rack and mounting, I didn't see any bushings of significance.

The S550 also has almost zero/zero scrub radius on OEM base (non Shelby, Mach 1 or PP2) wheels. A little bit of offset here, necessary with track-intent setups, definitely improves feel, though doesn't do much for response.
 

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Lateral arms on PP cars already have bearing points, though removing the rubber from the tension links also sharpens response and accuracy. Last I looked at the S550 EPAS rack and mounting, I didn't see any bushings of significance.

The S550 also has almost zero/zero scrub radius on OEM base (non Shelby, Mach 1 or PP2) wheels. A little bit of offset here, necessary with track-intent setups, definitely improves feel, though doesn't do much for response.
As per steeda their tension links also have higher durometer bushings than the PP ones do. Still not a bearing though but should offer some improvement over the stock PP links.
 

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At some point I think you have to address the compliances - lateral arm bushings and EPAS mounting come to mind here, as any movements permitted in those locations amount to little vaguenesses between the steering wheel and the contact patches. I'm not sure if there's much room for steering feel improvement in the K-member mounting.

Mildly 'stretching' the tires on wheels wider than "measuring width" also tends to help, assuming that doing so is at least class-legal.

Some years ago I DIY-stiffened the rack bushings on a FWD car that I autocrossed. Too long ago to remember much except that there was *some* improvement.


Norm
Norm,
would some camber , castor and toe adjustment not affect a better turn in and feel as well ?
or would that just improve grip ?
 

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Lateral arms on PP cars already have bearing points, though removing the rubber from the tension links also sharpens response and accuracy. Last I looked at the S550 EPAS rack and mounting, I didn't see any bushings of significance.

The S550 also has almost zero/zero scrub radius on OEM base (non Shelby, Mach 1 or PP2) wheels. A little bit of offset here, necessary with track-intent setups, definitely improves feel, though doesn't do much for response.
Which is correct part number for 18-20 tension link upgrade ?
Does one just replace bushing or whole thing ?
 

 
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