FRONT ONLY coil over?

Discussion in 'Suspension, Brakes & Chassis' started by er1kgr33n, Dec 23, 2019.

  1. er1kgr33n

    er1kgr33n Member

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    Does anyone know of a decently priced FRONT ONLY coil over set that is better then just a drop spring. I'm sure the argument is they are all better but I hear plenty of critics here about the SR and comparable priced kits. I like my rear setup currently and think my front could use something different. If anyone can point me in the right direction I would appreciate it.

    Also, does SR even have their own website?
     
  2. KellTrac

    KellTrac Active Member

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    SR Performance is American Muscle's brand. SR branded parts are simply just various makers of lower quality products that private label to the giant that American Muscle is. Some of the products are designed well and made in the US...many of them are simply Chinese knockoffs that are purchased for very low prices and marked up a ton.

    I don't really see a reason for anyone to go to a front coilover unless they are trying to set records or compete on track or drag strip. There are so many great front strut and spring offerings out there.
     
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  3. Flyhalf

    Flyhalf Well-Known Member

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    The simple question is...
    What do you need the coilovers for?
    :)
    Coilovers can cost $700 or 5k.
    Do you roadcorsue? Drag? Street only?
    Coilovers if..and i repeat if..needed are very specific to the use you need for
     
  4. shogun32

    shogun32 Well-Known Member

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    the Mustang's problem is primarily the rear suspension IMO. You can buy half a kit but the reason not to is typically the spring and damping rates will be mis-matched. Coilovers are not necessarily better just like not all aftermarket suspension is any good.
     
  5. BmacIL

    BmacIL Enginerd

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    Please explain what problem you're talking about? There's a lot to fix in the front depending on how you use the car.
     
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  6. OP
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    er1kgr33n

    er1kgr33n Member

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    I appreciate the replies guys...
    The coilover allows for a varying ride height. So If I want the 1/4" extra or less, I can have it. Ultimately being able to fine tune the front end will all but eliminate any bump steer issues. I currently am chasing a low speed noise/knock and squeak over bumps and will likely need an upgraded strut. I have SR progressive rate springs and stock struts. It has some residual bounce that is likely contributed to worn struts. If I am already looking at the cost of struts then why not see what options I have for a front only kit.

    This car is daily driven, spirited at times, and will be taken down the 1320 a couple times a year...
     
  7. Grintch

    Grintch Well-Known Member

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    The issue is the front and rear suspension have to work together, so mis matched front and rear is bad. Not only for springs but also shock damping.

    Steeda offers custom spring rates and I think offers the front and (not true coilover) rear seprately. So I would talk to them about what you have, and what you want to do.

    PS - lowering the front almost always makes bump steer worse.
     
  8. OP
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    er1kgr33n

    er1kgr33n Member

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    Well that is just not true. If what you think is true at all, then each company would only sell complete kits and everyone would discuss the importance of using a full system and why avoiding a split system is bad. If I source a front coilover kit that utilizes the same spring rate as the "like-a-coilover" setup the simple drop spring I'm using has, then there certainly won't be any issues. The dampers in a coilover kit work well at varying heights, unlike a factory damper. So its more likely the whole system will work better when you get the front under control. As I stated before, the rear setup I have, I like. I won't gain anything by changing it now.

    Maybe I need to find a drag strip only guy who feels all he needs is a rear setup and we can split the cost.
     
  9. BmacIL

    BmacIL Enginerd

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    "You didn't give me confirmation bias, you're wrong!"

    This thread.

    In short, it is impossible to isolate the front and rear, and the whole suspension of the vehicle (and the body and unsprung mass kinematics it is responsible for) is a system. Match your front to a similar setup as you have on the rear. If you have Konis, put the same type of Konis on the front. If you have a stock-like rear spring rate with a drop, do the same up front. It's a full system, and I don't have time to, and will not explain the physics for you.
     
  10. OP
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    er1kgr33n

    er1kgr33n Member

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    I like how my question was if anyone new of a singular coil-over system and now everyone is an internet hero with advice. How about you tell all the old school guys with leafs in the rear and coil-overs up front, or the fox guys with macpherson up front and 3 & 4-links in the rear that they are wrong. GEEEEZUS. If I made money everytime a little buddy bolt-on guy gave their opinion and was wrong I wouldn't be looking for deal on a separated system. This guy here uses the word "impossible". Are you living under a rock? Don't you realize that you are mixing manufacturers on your own suspension? Ya, I read your list.
     
  11. Radiation Joe

    Radiation Joe Well-Known Member

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    Tsk, Tsk, Tsk, Don't pick on Brian (Bryan?). He's an asset to our community even if he's off the mark. I believe that you don't have to match front to rear. They are independent of each other on many levels. Many of the best aftermarket suspension "systems" don't match ride frequencies front to rear. The e46 M3 in my avatar had 480 lb/in front wheel rates combined with 240 rear wheel rates. It was by far the best balanced car I have ever driven.
    I'm not happy with the GT350R front springs combined with the FP track struts. Way too soft. I'm thinking about calling up Ground-Control in California for a shortened Koni strut with 500 lb/in springs. I'll probably keep the GT350R rear springs with FP track shocks. That arrangement will again result in roughly a 2 to 1 frequency ratio front to rear. I have no doubt that Ground-Control would sell you a front only system.
     
  12. Bluemustang

    Bluemustang Well-Known Member

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    Interesting. I assume you are meaning too soft as in - too soft for the track? In regards to matching of the ride frequencies - it is not as if one corner of the car exists in a vacuum from the other 3 corners, or the front suspension functions in a vacuum with respect to the rear. Brian is right. It needs to work as a system. And yes you can mix parts if you know what you are doing and understand the totality of the results.

    Also, I suspect if you go that high up front, you will also want to increase the rear rate some as well. Maybe not by the same proportion and the relationship will still shift heavily to the front, but I'm not sure you will like the result with 500# fronts and ~900# rears.
     
  13. Radiation Joe

    Radiation Joe Well-Known Member

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    The GT350 springs are soft enough that I've contacted the bump stops in front over certain freeway undulations, not potholes or large bumps. And remember, this is an Ecoboost. I learned a long time ago to keep the suspension as soft as possible. But it still needs to be stiff enough to work for it's intended purpose. I haven't spent time on track in several years, but I intend to again at some point with this car. I prefer stiff front springs on track for control under braking and to minimize the need for -3 degrees of camber.
    It's my opinion that the only reason no vendor supplies performance springs stiffer than 300 lb/in is that they won't stay seated at full droop with the majority of struts available. With shorter struts (like from Ground-Control or MCS) we are free to explore spring rates more in tune with controlling a 3700 lb car.
     
  14. BmacIL

    BmacIL Enginerd

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    Given that this guy doesn't have serious track aspirations (says "it just feels like it needs something" - OK), relatively close front to rear ride frequencies between 1.5-1.7 Hz are ideal for a street car and sport handling. I'm under no delusions that the 245 lb front springs are too soft for a mostly track car. For a dual use, but primarily street car it's very solid. Coupled with a stiff front bar and front roll center correction, on track it is far from "way too soft". Maybe agree to disagree here, but at no point on the road course did I feel that I was was waiting for the car or that it rolled excessively. Autocross - yes, it needs quite a bit more spring and damping control.

    I'll be moving to Ridetech HQ coilovers this spring, starting with 400 fronts, 550 rears. As my car is becoming more of a competition car and less a DD, it's the natural progression.

    The only springs for stock style struts that have higher than 300 lb working rate are the steeda dual rate at 350 lb, and the lower 250 lb rate is used mostly as a helper spring.

    FYI Ground Control will not sell you just front or just rear coilover kits, only the whole thing. I asked. Even if you could get just their front coilover kit, there aren't really any stock style dampers that can control a 400+ lb front spring that well. You need a true coilover monotube. The Konis, even with custom valving, are limited in their low speed damping capabilities.
     
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  15. Radiation Joe

    Radiation Joe Well-Known Member

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    Can't say I disagree. And don't get me wrong, even if I complain about the GT350R springs not being stiff enough in the front, the combination of GT350R springs with FP track struts and shocks is an order of magnitude improvement over the stock performance package set-up. For all the gushing I do about my old e46 suspension, I didn't like the double adjustable Konis I had in front; for the reason you stated, poor low speed compression damping.
    However, I do stick with my argument that a comfortable (relatively) well balanced system can have significantly different ride frequencies front to rear. I believe it comes down to individual preferences and how the rest of the system is tuned; i.e. bars, shocks and bushings.
     
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