coil over kit

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1emglenn

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My god! You did that with the PZero's. Those came on my 16 and I didn't even have them for a thousand miles before I got rid of them and went to Michelins. The PZero's walls are so soft they feel like they are going to roll right off the wheel in hard cornering. How did you ever pull that off, no matter how much it was banked.





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My god! You did that with the PZero's. Those came on my 16 and I didn't even have them for a thousand miles before I got rid of them and went to Michelins. The PZero's walls are so soft they feel like they are going to roll right off the wheel in hard cornering. How did you ever pull that off, no matter how much it was banked.
I think by pure luck. I have Hankook K127 now for street use very happy for the price and much better than the PZero's.
 
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Okay guys, the mystery is solved. My mechanic just called me, (he just removed the ISC) out of curiosity he tried to compress the rear shock piston by hand. It compressed with very little resistance. Apparently ISC sent defective shocks with the kit. Perhaps though this was serendipitous, otherwise I wouldn't have blogged with you guys and learned the error of my ways. I'm still getting rid of the ISC because if that is their quality control who knows what else would be totally sub-par.
 

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I think by pure luck. I have Hankook K127 now for street use very happy for the price and much better than the PZero's.
Side question: You spend a fair amount of time on a racetrack. Do you ever have issues with the differential overheating? I have a hypothesis that the Torsen is part of the issue and none of the Euro cars have one. So if you can run for an extended period of time without overheating the rear-end, that would support my claim.
 
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Still thinking about it and trying to make myself more informed. Haven't made a decision as yet and I'm just having the mechanic put the old suspension back on for now. All of you have given me a lot of options and a lot to think about. Want the best I can do without breaking the bank.
 
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I have never had a rear-end overheating problem. But, the club I use to get track time has drivers of many different skill levels. They break us down into groups and give us only 30 minutes of track time apiece at one time. You will get multiple times throughout the day, usually four or five, sometimes six in the summer. Might not be enough time to test your theory, but I had a 3.73 with Torsen in the 16 and the 19 has 3.55 with Torsen and neither has overheated. Of course I am in track mode which does override traction control. Don't know how much difference that would make, but maybe it does.
 

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Still thinking about it and trying to make myself more informed. Haven't made a decision as yet and I'm just having the mechanic put the old suspension back on for now. All of you have given me a lot of options and a lot to think about. Want the best I can do without breaking the bank.
I'd suggest you get in touch with [email protected] except he's been MIA for at least a month.


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Side question: You spend a fair amount of time on a racetrack. Do you ever have issues with the differential overheating? I have a hypothesis that the Torsen is part of the issue and none of the Euro cars have one. So if you can run for an extended period of time without overheating the rear-end, that would support my claim.
I have never had a rear-end overheating problem. But, the club I use to get track time has drivers of many different skill levels. They break us down into groups and give us only 30 minutes of track time apiece at one time. You will get multiple times throughout the day, usually four or five, sometimes six in the summer. Might not be enough time to test your theory, but I had a 3.73 with Torsen in the 16 and the 19 has 3.55 with Torsen and neither has overheated. Of course I am in track mode which does override traction control. Don't know how much difference that would make, but maybe it does.
By the way just realized the reply button on everybody's post works even though it isn't highlighted. Duh!
 

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Side question: You spend a fair amount of time on a racetrack. Do you ever have issues with the differential overheating? I have a hypothesis that the Torsen is part of the issue and none of the Euro cars have one. So if you can run for an extended period of time without overheating the rear-end, that would support my claim.
I don't have Torsen but I don't run very long tracks nor I run a lot of laps. A friend of mine overheated his diff on his convertable so I don't think this issue is limited to Torsen only cars.
 

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I have never had a rear-end overheating problem. But, the club I use to get track time has drivers of many different skill levels. They break us down into groups and give us only 30 minutes of track time apiece at one time. You will get multiple times throughout the day, usually four or five, sometimes six in the summer. Might not be enough time to test your theory, but I had a 3.73 with Torsen in the 16 and the 19 has 3.55 with Torsen and neither has overheated. Of course I am in track mode which does override traction control. Don't know how much difference that would make, but maybe it does.
I would think that powering out of a corner would generate more heat with a clutch or cone style diff than a Torsen. The friction surfaces are being forced to permit slip while under pressure - this being the same mechanism that makes a conventional limited slip diff gradually wear until it essentially becomes an open diff. Autocross is murder on them.


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I would think that powering out of a corner would generate more heat with a clutch or cone style diff than a Torsen. The friction surfaces are being forced to permit slip while under pressure - this being the same mechanism that makes a conventional limited slip diff gradually wear until it essentially becomes an open diff. Autocross is murder on them.

Norm
I was making the assumption that any Trac-Loc would be burnt out and essentially an open after about the first hour on track. A Trac-Loc lasts for fewer than 50 real traction 'events'. An Auburn cone diff lasts for about a 1/2 dozen.

A good plate-style diff (Let's say OS Giken, but I haven't seen the data) should lock 100% (like a spool) when on throttle, which should reduce internal temps. You shift the slip/heat generation from the diff to the tire surface. That's my thought, anyway. If Trac-Loc diff'ed cars are overheating the rear-end, though, this argues against me.
 

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If a torsen overheats what actually goes bad? Since it is all gears does it just shorten the life of the gears? I would think friction based diffs need better heat management?
 

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