Spark Plug Change - Anti Seize?

Discussion in 'Shelby GT350 Mustang' started by UnhandledException, Jan 10, 2020.

  1. OP
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    UnhandledException

    UnhandledException Well-Known Member

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    When you say tips, you mean the top most metal piece (NOT where the spark happens but opposite) or the white/blue striped plastic center section sitting between the hex nut and the metal piece?

    also of the people who swear using AS is great, have you used it on vodoo or others only?
     
  2. OP
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    UnhandledException

    UnhandledException Well-Known Member

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    Also the spark plug boxes say “gaps not adjustable”. Is that something to be ignored?
     
  3. DCShelby

    DCShelby Well-Known Member

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    Most of them come already properly gapped. Does not hurt to check it though
     
  4. galaxy

    galaxy Well-Known Member

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    The dielectric grease goes on the coil end, not on the end that goes in the engine. I haven’t used anti seize on this engine because I haven’t now had the plugs out yet. But I will when that day comes. Have used it however on my Coyote engine and every other thing I own.
     
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    UnhandledException

    UnhandledException Well-Known Member

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    The plugs I received are all gapped 0.053-0.054. I checked the user manual and it doesnt say what the gap should be. Is this gap OK?
     
  6. JAJ

    JAJ Well-Known Member

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    upload_2020-1-11_10-14-34.png
     
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  7. OP
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    UnhandledException

    UnhandledException Well-Known Member

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    I did the plugs today. I want to thank everyone here who have helped me. I wish I could buy you all beer or lunch.

    I will post pictures tomorrow but here are some notes/questions:

    - Every one of my plugs had lots of oil on all the threads (not just tip). In fact, when you removed the coils, the plastic seal around the metal tube on the valve cover body were coated with oil. And furthermore, blowing air on the plugs (after removing coils but before the old plug) I could see wetness blowing out (possibly oil).

    - Every one of my plugs had white powder like material on their tips.

    - Of the 8 coils, 2 had their black rubber boot (the part that slides on the gray tube) had twisted/folded upwards. These coils would not stay on when installed but rather push themselves out. Obviously once the bolt was in, coil wouldnt move.

    - I did not use anti seize. And I am glad I didnt because the torque value of 11 ft/lbs was so easy to attain. Most plugs didnt even require much torque wrench once I hand tightened them.

    - I had bought this backward angled/bent spark plug ratcheting wrench and it made things so much easier. Its $36 on amazon and I highly recommend it.

    - Loosening plugs is not easy. It feels like they will break and it required a lot of patience and gentle torque by my arms. I remember doing the first plug and I literally “gave up” 5-6 times and said I will break these if I keep trying. But eventually I kept at it.

    - The farther in plug on passenger side requires : A spark plug socket with a small 2” extension that has a built in angle adapter, and another 3/8” angle adapter on top and another 2-3” extension. Its not easy. And be careful torquing it properly.

    Overall my car runs smoother. Also I ran it to 8250 rpm lots of times and it feels like car revs much quicker and pulls harder.

    For $46 a set, this is one of the cheapest things to replace and going forward I will do this every 20,000 miles.

    Questions:

    - What does it mean for plugs to have that much fresh oil?
    - Why are the tips white powder/corroded?
    - Those boots of the coils that are folded, should the coils be replaced or leave them alone?

    Thanks guys!
     
  8. DCShelby

    DCShelby Well-Known Member

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    Oil on the tips of the plugs is not good. Could be leaky valve stem seals in the head.
     
  9. BlackandBlue

    BlackandBlue Well-Known Member

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    Oil on the spark plug threads is perfectly normal.

    The seal is on the top of the threads so oil is expected to get into the threads.

    This doesn’t pertain to your engine as much but spark plugs can tell you lots of information on a race/nitrous engine.


    http://www.4secondsflat.com/Spark_plug_reading.html
     
  10. JAJ

    JAJ Well-Known Member

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    Ok, first, on the "beer or lunch" thing, just post your credit card number and we'll take it from there... :giggle:

    The three questions:

    Oil on the plug threads is normal.

    Which "tips" are you referring to - the end in the cylinder or the end with the coil? If it's the cylinder end, that's just combustion deposits that are normal - again don't worry about it. If it's the end under the coil sleeve, that's corrosion that a little wipe of dielectric grease can prevent.

    If the rubber boots are folding up as you push them over the plugs, wipe some dielectric grease on the plugs first (or on the inside of the boot) and they should just slide over.

    Other comments;

    If there's oil down the spark plug hole before you remove the plug, that's coming from the seal in the valve cover and you might want to replace those seals at some point. But a bit of oil that's taken 50,000 miles to accumulate isn't a serious problem so don't get worried about it.

    If the plugs were hard to get out, then why didn't you put anti-seize on them? The whole point of it is to make the plugs easier to remove the next time.
     
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  11. Alain

    Alain Well-Known Member

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    You got a link on amazon to that spark plug socket you’re talking about?

    GM lad you were able to get the job done yourself.
     
  12. DCShelby

    DCShelby Well-Known Member

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    Oil on the plug threads is not normal. Oil on the tip of the plug electrode is not normal either. If oil is getting into the threads then the o ring that seals the valve cover to the head around the plug hole is leaking some. Oil on the tip of the electrode is not good at all.
     
  13. galaxy

    galaxy Well-Known Member

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    Hahahhahahah...although on a car this well maintained it probably won’t matter much, I can’t believe after all that you decided not to use anti-seize.
     
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  14. shogun32

    shogun32 Well-Known Member

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    you ALWAYS change the torque values down (rule of thumb 20%) when dealing with a 'wet' fastener. In cast iron heads you can get away with sloppy practice. In Aluminum do the right thing. No, you won't immediately strip the threads if you do it wrong once or twice but you'll be deforming them and they'll tear out eventually. Also use a torque wrench of proper size. A 50ft/lb torque wrench set to 10 is not accurate. Buy an inch/lb unit and set it to 120. 10ft/lb is moderate hand tight so if you're wrench isn't clicking when it should have, just stop.
     
  15. OP
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    UnhandledException

    UnhandledException Well-Known Member

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    I use precision instruments torque wrenches. I have two of them: 5-50 ft lb and 50-250 ft lb. i looked but I couldnt find one that is lower than 5-50 range. Do you have a brand you can recommend?
     
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