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Mike Pfeifer

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That stupid thing caused my ears to pop when I had the windows down. I was pissed it was just how the cabin worked but nope, sound tube. Bye bye
This is an interesting statement- are you saying wind buffeting is more pronounced with the sound tube than without? Trying to picture how that could be the case. Unless it allows for more air volume to escape the cabin, the incoming air pressure waves will likely over power what ever the sound tube can produce.
 

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This is an interesting statement- are you saying wind buffeting is more pronounced with the sound tube than without? Trying to picture how that could be the case. Unless it allows for more air volume to escape the cabin, the incoming air pressure waves will likely over power what ever the sound tube can produce.
It doesn't allow any air into the cabin. That round thing about midway is a diaphragm and only sound / vibrations make it into the cabin.
 

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It doesn't allow any air into the cabin. That round thing about midway is a diaphragm and only sound / vibrations make it into the cabin.
That’s what I thought, so I don’t see how it could enhance or detract from the wind buffeting pressure waves. Unless removing it creates an extra hole in the cabin for the air to escape.
 

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That’s what I thought, so I don’t see how it could enhance or detract from the wind buffeting pressure waves. Unless removing it creates an extra hole in the cabin for the air to escape.

Here's how it works, vibrations from air.

Piping in a Little Engine Music by TIM MORAN FEB. 26, 2009

IT looks like nothing more than a black plastic tube with a bulge at one end, but without it the driver of a 2010 Ford Mustang GT might feel he has a lot less than 540 horsepower at his command. Like a drinking glass held to a hotel-room door, the tube directs sound from under the hood to the passenger cabin, letting a driver know what is happening over in the engine compartment. Tempting as it might be to dismiss this seemingly simple bit of under hood plumbing as a high-tech kazoo — Ford would really prefer that you call it an induction sound tube — the piping turns out to be an essential element of customer satisfaction, according to David Pericak, chief engineer for the Mustang. “I did drive Mustangs without the sound tube in them,” he said. “It was like watching a movie with all the drama, but totally disorienting without the sound.” Development engineers have long recognized the role that sound plays in a driver’s impression of a car’s power and responsiveness. That is why acoustical experts are working with engineering teams to import just the right amount of mechanical and exhaust chatter into the passenger cabin — enough to give occupants some feedback, but not so much that it annoys them. “It’s part of our ergonomics — when you push on an accelerator you want to have feedback,” Mr. Pericak said, adding that without a good indication of what’s happening under the hood it would be almost impossible to wring full performance from the car. Mann+Hummel Group, a European parts supplier, is the maker of sound components used in the Mustang and some Jaguars as well as Ford Focus models in Europe. John Baumann, manager for business development at Mann+Hummel, said the sound tube concept comes out of long experience in making very quiet automotive air intake systems. “We were well-suited for this product because of our experience with acoustics for intake manifolds and air cleaner systems,” he said. “This is one of the few times we allow our engineers to make some noise.” Mann+Hummel makes two different kinds of sound devices. One, the sound tube, transmits vibrations from air in the intake system to a part named a trumpet, where it vibrates a stretched rubber diaphragm. On the other side of the diaphragm is what engineers call a broadcast tube. It transmits the sound through a tuned orifice and into the passenger compartment. The other system, called a Symposer, carries sound waves from the pressurized air flow of an engine turbocharger. That system uses air pulses to drive a plastic paddle that beats on a membrane housed in a small plastic chamber, which sends the sound through a tube to the passenger compartment. It’s much like a small drum, but one that transmits engine air pulses rather than individual drumbeats. That allows pass-through of the engine sound despite the muffling effect of turbocharging. No engine air flows through the systems. The tubes also cannot create false sounds. They only enhance the engine’s existing voice, Mr. Baumann said. The task of sound pipe designers is to maximize pleasant tones while minimizing high-frequency sounds, Mr. Baumann said. The sound of an accelerating engine typically ranges through six harmonic orders — frequencies that are a multiple of engine speed — and he said the most desirable sounds are usually in the second and third orders, corresponding to the pleasing note people associate with V6 or V-8 engines. Mr. Pericak of Ford said the sound was tuned to meet exacting specifications. For instance, the sound inside the car must be tuned to assure that the engine thrum is the same for both the driver and passengers. Engine sound affects drivers and passengers in other ways, too. Maserati recently publicized the results of a British study that found women who listened to the roar of its sports cars had strong biological responses — specifically, increased hormone levels in their saliva. The challenge of providing desirable feedback is increasing because the fuel saving systems in new engines may also alter their sound output. Twin turbochargers, which can muffle an otherwise muscular exhaust note, are becoming more common; Ford’s EcoBoost program introduces twin-turbo V-6s to replace V8s. New direct fuel injection systems, on the other hand, can add a diesel-like rattle. The work to give drivers familiar engine-sound feedback is likely to expand as fuel-economy rules tighten and engine sizes continue to shrink, potentially paving the way for broader use of sound-carrying systems in the vehicle fleet.

Correction: March 15, 2009 An article on March 1 about a device designed to transmit engine sounds to a car’s passenger compartment misstated the model name of a 2010 Ford vehicle that uses the device. It is the Mustang GT, not the Shelby GT500. A version of this article appears in print on, on Page AU4 of the National edition with the headline: Piping

Many S197 owners removed the little foam piece from the sound tube at the firewall to increase the sound. If the stock exhaust is replaced with a cat-back that has drone, the sound is worse in the cabin unless the tube is removed or valved. That's one reason S550 owners pull it off. One last tidbit..... the results of a British study that found women who listened to the roar of its sports cars had strong biological responses — specifically, increased hormone levels in their saliva... yes it's true... no sound tube = less women. :)
 
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Mike Pfeifer

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Here's how it works...
I am familiar with the sound tube, first saw it on the first generation BMW Z4 in the mid 2000s. I think you may be misunderstanding my comments. A previous poster stated his ears were popping with the windows down and claimed removing the sound tube was the resolution. Usually when someone complains about the ear popping with the windows down, they are referring to what’s called wind buffeting. Essentially you get a pressure wave that builds and collapses rapidly as air tries to enter and simultaneously escape the vehicle cabin. I’m sure you have experienced it, it’s pretty unmistakable, and it can be incredibly loud to the point of being painful. So when the sound tube removal was said to possibly be the resolution to this, I wanted to very this was what was being talked about, and try to figure out how it could possibly be the case. The only thing I can think of, is that a new hole is opened up where the sound tube used to be, allowing more air to escape than coming in, thereby stopping the buffeting.
 
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I just found out my car has FOUR sound tubes installed by Ford.... every single one of them pumps sound into the interior when the windows are down:

pipes.jpg


Any ideas on how to fix this dilemma.....??????
Thinking if it ain't broke don't fix it ............. does not look broke and did not sound broke the last time heard on the black top...
:champagne:
 

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I am familiar with the sound tube, first saw it on the first generation BMW Z4 in the early 2000s. I think you may be misunderstanding my comments. A previous poster stated his ears were popping with the windows down and claimed removing the sound tube was the resolution. Usually when someone complains about the ear popping with the windows down, they are referring to what’s called wind buffeting. Essentially you get a pressure wave that builds and collapses rapidly as air tries to enter and simultaneously escape the vehicle cabin. I’m sure you have experienced it, it’s pretty unmistakable, and it can be incredibly loud to the point of being painful. So when the sound tube removal was said to possibly be the resolution to this, I wanted to very this was what was being talked about, and try to figure out how it could possibly be the case. The only thing I can think of, is that a new hole is opened up where the sound tube used to be, allowing more air to escape than coming in, thereby stopping the buffeting.
Nope, I'm understanding, just responding to this.

This is an interesting statement- are you saying wind buffeting is more pronounced with the sound tube than without? Trying to picture how that could be the case. Unless it allows for more air volume to escape the cabin, the incoming air pressure waves will likely over power what ever the sound tube can produce.
If you already know how a sound tube works, there's nothing to try to picture... correct?? We get buffeting in the windy state of Oklahoma all the time in every car we own, doesn't have anything to do with a sound tube, it's impossible.
 

Mike Pfeifer

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Nope, I'm understanding, just responding to this.



If you already know how a sound tube works, there's nothing to try to picture... correct?? We get buffeting in the windy state of Oklahoma all the time in every car we own, doesn't have anything to do with a sound tube, it's impossible.
Correct, with or without a sound tube, the cabin is sealed, unless removing it opens a new hole, in which case the conditions to start the pressure wave might change. This is what I was curious about, yet also skeptical.
 

bjstang

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Correct, with or without a sound tube, the cabin is sealed, unless removing it opens a new hole, in which case the conditions to start the pressure wave might change. This is what I was curious about, yet also skeptical.
Removing the fallopian tube does leave a hole, at the firewall that should be plugged, many don't do it. It's doubtful that all who pulled the tube loose from the firewall installed the plug. If buffeting was an issue they would be plugging it.

1.jpg


Not my pic, that compartment is dirty.
 
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Mike Pfeifer

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Removing the fallopian tube does leave a hole, at the firewall that should be plugged, many don't do it.

1.jpg


Not my pic, that compartment is dirty.
Yeah that’s pretty small. What is it, maybe 2 inches? I can’t believe that has enough effect on anything to be noticeable.
 

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The plug is quite a bit bigger than the hole.

1.jpg
What's the hose clamp all about. ? Installed a Roush CIA, firewall plug was in the kit. Was an interference type of deal. (snapped in)

That thing look likes over kill and a PIA to install. 2 parts and a clamp suggest going inside & under the dash ?
 

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What's the hose clamp all about. ? Installed a Roush CIA, firewall plug was in the kit. Was an interference type of deal. (snapped in)

That thing look likes over kill and a PIA to install. 2 parts and a clamp suggest going inside & under the dash ?
One plug is for firewall. Hose clamp and other plug are for use with stock air box.
 

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