GT500 Engine Automobile Mag

Discussion in 'Shelby GT500 Mustang' started by nametoshowothers, Jun 12, 2019.

  1. nametoshowothers

    nametoshowothers Well-Known Member

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    #1 nametoshowothers, Jun 12, 2019
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 13, 2019
    https://www.automobilemag.com/news/2020-ford-mustang-shelby-gt500-v-8-engine/

    2020-GT500-engine.jpg

    2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500: More Details on Its 700+HP Engine
    Ford Performance’s powertrain manager divulges details on the mighty Predator V-8.

    The upcoming 2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 has its sights firmly trained on the Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 and Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat. Ford’s is still keeping quiet about the final output numbers for the mega Mustang’s supercharged, 5.2-liter V-8 engine but we do know it will top 700 horsepower. A dual-clutch gearbox is the transmission of choice, a first for the Mustang and a first for any muscle car. Ford Performance powertrain manager Patrick Morgan has more than 30 years of experience developing engines, including time at Jaguar, Aston Martin, and Cosworth. We recently sat down with him to talk about the development of the GT500’s new “Predator” V-8.

    Automobile Magazine: How is this new GT500 engine related to the 5.0-liter Coyote in the GT/Bullitt, and the GT350’s high-revving, 5.2-liter Voodoo version?

    Patrick Morgan: The core architecture is the same. It’s built at the Romeo [Michigan] engine plant and based on the that Coyote architecture. The bore and stroke are the same as the Voodoo. We’ve gone through it and said, ‘How do we handle 125 bar [1813 psi] of firing pressure for the supercharged engine?’ We increased strength in the block and heads. We went to longer head bolts and deeper columns. We also added a fourth active layer to the head gasket and additional casting structure in the head. In the interest of commonality and efficiency, we’re rolling those changes into Voodoo too. The [GT500’s cross-plane] crankshaft is an interesting story. Because it’s supercharged, we’re not so sensitive to tuning. As you know, the GT350 has a flat-plane crank and it’s lauded for its high-speed tune. We are affectionate and love the flat-plane crank with the sound and feel, but it does bring with it some very interesting challenges when it comes to vibration.

    So, does that 8250-rpm GT350 engine have a future?

    It’s its own love affair with Ford and the enthusiasts. We’re constantly looking at our product line and where it sits. I can’t elaborate on our plans going forward. But we do love that engine!

    What other advancements have been made to the GT500 engine?

    We’ve put a lot of effort into the fundamentals. It uses a bar-plate cooler—a low-temp intercooler above the supercharger rotors. A tremendous amount of effort went in to make sure we had the right capacity to keep the charge air temps down on the track. We really wanted to maintain the performance. In the bottom end, you start looking long and hard at dry sump with the g loads we’re pulling. We’re right on the cusp. But we looked at the weight and cost as well as the development time and said, ‘Are we sure there isn’t a better way?’ We were able to put together a structural [wet-sump] oil pan that ties to the dual-clutch transmission. Inside the oil pan are trap-door baffles—one-way baffles on hinges. It traps the oil from running up the other side of the pan during high g loads. Also, we ended up using an aluminum viscous damper for the crank damper. That’s to handle the supercharged loads on the nose of the crank and all the torsional loads. It’s a nice solution to get weight off the nose of the engine and thus the nose of the car.

    What are the compression ratio, redline, and max boost pressure?

    It has a 9.5:1 compression ratio, a 7500-rpm redline, and about 12 psi of max boost.

    What’s involved getting a 700-plus-hp engine to play nicely with a DCT?

    The biggest challenge is taking an engine that flows a massive amount of air and then have torque management down to just a few foot-pounds, in order to get smooth shifts. Our engine calibration team and Tremec’s DCT calibration team have worked so well together. We have a couple of [Tremec] calibrators that basically live with us in Dearborn. We’ve had umpteen number of trips with people coming over from Belgium to work with our technical leaders making sure our torque management works well and plays nicely with the Tremec shift strategy. We have shifts that are under 100 milliseconds. Yet under light load it drives like any automatic.

    What specific cars and engines did you benchmark?

    You always benchmark the pony cars—that’s obvious. Then for the various subsystems, you tend to look further out. We looked at AMG and we always pay attention to features on the Corvette. Porsche is a huge benchmark from a transmission perspective; its DCT [marketed as PDK] is phenomenal. I’m always personally paying attention to the competitive V-8 engines—AMG, BMW, and Audi. How they do their boosting systems, how they do the bottom-end design, their solutions to valvetrain, etc.

    The GT500 is the only supercharged engine at a company that’s all about EcoBoost turbocharging. Why?

    It’s a different project to go after raw performance that can span from, say, 2000 rpm to 7000 rpm and couple nicely with a DCT. Supercharging was the right solution for us. We have to work within the constraints and timing, and also have to make something that’s affordable for the customer. With turbocharging, you can make an engine with lots and lots of torque. Look at the 3.5-liter EcoBoost in the F-series pickup. It’s fantastic. But it kind of runs out of energy around 6000 or 6500 rpm. You say that you want a high-revving turbo engine? I can do that. Just look at the same basic engine in the Ford GT: 647 horsepower. But then you have to do some special things to get it to drive nicely down at lower speeds. With a supercharger, especially this 2650 Eaton supercharger, it breathes nicely everywhere.

    But what about the emissions and fuel-economy challenges of supercharging?

    The GT500 is about where you’d expect any muscle car to be today. We’re studying what to do as next steps, same as everyone else. This engine is still port fuel-injected, so it does really well with particulates. It doesn’t have direct injection. The engine is kind of at the end of its box for the technology it needs to take the next step, but fortunately, some of those new technologies are “and solutions,” meaning you can still pick up a bit of fuel-economy and emissions improvements.
     
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  2. Grey03

    Grey03 Well-Known Member

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    Nice find. Thanks for sharing.
     
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  3. Houston Kid

    Houston Kid Well-Known Member

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    Not a bad read. Pretty straight forward with no surprises.

    Thanks for posting.
     
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  4. Epiphany

    Epiphany Well-Known Member

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    I knew it used a viscous damper but thought it was steel and not aluminum. Interesting.

    I sense the oil pump gear is still powdered metal as Ford would be lauding a steel gear if they were now using one.

    And funny that they don't mention the ZL1 1LE in terms of bench marking but instead talk about the Corvette.
     
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  5. Hack

    Hack Well-Known Member

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    Someone here with more time and knowledge than me should be able to extract a power estimate from the 1813 psi firing pressure mentioned in the article.

    AMIRIGHT?
     
  6. Strokerswild

    Strokerswild Shallow and Pedantic

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    I did a bit ago, and within seconds a bunch of guys rappelled from a black helicopter and absconded with me.
     
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  7. eighty6gt

    eighty6gt Well-Known Member

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    1800 psi * 10.75 in^2 piston = 20,000 lb * 1.83 in /12 in * 8 = 25,000 lb-ft

    ??????
     
  8. obspsd

    obspsd Well-Known Member

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    = 772.1 hp
     
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  9. Darkane

    Darkane Well-Known Member

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    He said all changes will move forward to voodoo.

    Better not include the 4 layer head gasket though.
     
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  10. Mountain376

    Mountain376 Well-Known Member

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    “You always benchmark the pony cars—that’s obvious.”
     
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  11. mrbillwot

    mrbillwot Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure they would be doing that while MY19 GT350 orders are unfulfilled and a lot of customers & dealers are unhappy enough with delays. You never effectively dis your own current crop and surely if that was pitched as a common element fixed for any reliability reasons...well they know better - you don't osbourn.
     
  12. GrabberBlue

    GrabberBlue Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like Voodoo is sticking around
     
  13. honeybadger

    honeybadger Just don't care

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    Definitely the most interesting nugget for me. What do they have up their sleeves?
     
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  14. Roger Blose

    Roger Blose Well-Known Member

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    They should have brought up the current oil consumption issue with the Voodoo motors to see if they have a solution beyond the ticking and rattles of the Coyote owners!
     
  15. Epiphany

    Epiphany Well-Known Member

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    Except the blown 5.2 creates much more load on the crank snout, etc, than a naturally aspirated engine does. Witness the issues previous generation GT500 owners had when the wick was turned up (usually in the form of a larger supercharger, headers, etc). The OPG is much more sensitive in boosted applications. So saying it was necessary on a supercharged engine isn't poo pooing on a N/A engine by any means.
     
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