Manuals Are Losers

Dfeeds

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I think you nailed it, forklift pedals are quite a bit farther apart. Curious why left foot on car brakes still seems so much more sensitive though. Maybe just the different used leg/foot muscles.
Forklifts have drum brakes which has a bit to do with it and it's also just how it's set up. Two of the forklifts, at my job,
have a completely different feel than the rest, and also have an auto brake (I hate it, makes you look like an amateur). My other guess would be because it's basically essential to ride the brakes of a forklift, especially if you're in doors and in tight spaces.

It could also just be leverage. Pushing your left foot straight down is easier to apply force than if your foot is more at an angle. I tried driving a forklift with one foot, for kicks, and nearly crashed because of not applying enough brake force with my right foot. Then I panicked as 10k lbs of steel didn't stop when I expected it to. Scawy. It also felt really awkward having my right foot at the angle needed to quickly switch between the two pedals.
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Sivi70980

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Forklifts have drum brakes which has a bit to do with it and it's also just how it's set up. Two of the forklifts, at my job,
have a completely different feel than the rest, and also have an auto brake (I hate it, makes you look like an amateur). My other guess would be because it's basically essential to ride the brakes of a forklift, especially if you're in doors and in tight spaces.

It could also just be leverage. Pushing your left foot straight down is easier to apply force than if your foot is more at an angle. I tried driving a forklift with one foot, for kicks, and nearly crashed because of not applying enough brake force with my right foot. Then I panicked as 10k lbs of steel didn't stop when I expected it to. Scawy. It also felt really awkward having my right foot at the angle needed to quickly switch between the two pedals.
Pretty much same experiences lol. We got electric forklifts a few years ago switching from propane and it was a learning curve for sure. One of them has the auto parking brake and nobody likes it at all. I always like going back to a propane or diesel forklift, just easier to be smoother with. Hope the 10k of steel didn't hurt anyone or anything.
 

accel

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Just watch it. The GT 10A vs MT82 is discussed. Learn a bit.

At some point self-driving cars will be faster than human driven automatics. This guy will loose his job.

I have no idea what kind of fully automatic laundry machine my friends have. I do not care.
 

TeeLew

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Autos are faster, particularly in a straight line than manuals. The guy in the video doesn't understand the power/traction/gearing/shift time relationship. They're not faster due to lower gearing. Once the total gearing is lower than ~12:1, traction is a much bigger issue.

The real killer of auto vs. manual is shifting time. The auto is very fast in its shifting and that makes all the difference. More gears, which keep the engine in its preferred rev range helps as well, but an auto with the same gearing as the manual would still be faster just due to the shifting.
 

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I'd also argue the auto will do it to the same level of speed (shift time) every time, never miss a shift, never hit the limiter whereas a human may on occasion meet or even exceed the auto, but every single time? In a high pressure situation?
If I am at the lights against an auto the other driver mashes the pedal and concentrates on not taking out pedestrians, I have a lot more to do and I have to do it right every time. Put another way same car same driver an auto will more often than not win, at least at my level of skill.

But for the record I am OK with that, it wasn't why I bought the car. Happy to take the same driver on in the twisties.
 

Kevindust

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My first car (parents hand me down) was a rear wheel drive automatic, I've been left foot braking since I was 16. I got pretty adept at it when I was stock car racing. I raced a '94 Escort GT in a 4-4-Fun class, the car was a manual but I could run the 3/8 mile paved oval in second gear (just bouncing off the rev limiter at the end of the straights). I found that left foot braking allowed me to go deeper in the corners and really dance on the edge of grip. Great times!

Every vehicle I own now has three pedals so I haven't tried left foot braking in years.
 

Dfeeds

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Pretty much same experiences lol. We got electric forklifts a few years ago switching from propane and it was a learning curve for sure. One of them has the auto parking brake and nobody likes it at all. I always like going back to a propane or diesel forklift, just easier to be smoother with. Hope the 10k of steel didn't hurt anyone or anything.
I caught it in time haha. One of those moments where 3 seconds felt like ten minutes. So are you using the electric standing (reach) forklifts or is it still the sitting ones?
 

Genxer

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Long term, I might need a new clutch. Long term with an auto, you might need a new transmission. But that wouldn't necessarily sway my decision. If I was commuting in traffic or bracket racing, I'd rock an auto.
 

TeeLew

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My first car (parents hand me down) was a rear wheel drive automatic, I've been left foot braking since I was 16. I got pretty adept at it when I was stock car racing. I raced a '94 Escort GT in a 4-4-Fun class, the car was a manual but I could run the 3/8 mile paved oval in second gear (just bouncing off the rev limiter at the end of the straights). I found that left foot braking allowed me to go deeper in the corners and really dance on the edge of grip. Great times!

Every vehicle I own now has three pedals so I haven't tried left foot braking in years.
Left foot braking & mixing pedals on a FWD car has the opposite effect as with a rear drive car. The former reduces front brake bias. The latter increases it.

Some very, very good racing drivers brake with their right foot. Particularly in a GT-type car, it's of little advantage and has genuine drawbacks if not done correctly. Generally speaking, the best left-foot brakers are the ones who started in karts at 5 years old.
 

Sivi70980

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I caught it in time haha. One of those moments where 3 seconds felt like ten minutes. So are you using the electric standing (reach) forklifts or is it still the sitting ones?
Sitting ones. We had a stand up one once but nobody felt comfortable using it. I liked it though. We also use army 10k’s with the extending boom and tilting cab and they’re fun, more so when better than 75% of the controls work but that’s a rarity. We have a few propane and one diesel. The diesel is fun because the direction of travel is changed via gas pedal. It has a slight swivel switch depending on if you press on the right or left side of it. It’s great for forklift burnouts…so I hear.
 

TXGTPig

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My first car (parents hand me down) was a rear wheel drive automatic, I've been left foot braking since I was 16. I got pretty adept at it when I was stock car racing. I raced a '94 Escort GT in a 4-4-Fun class, the car was a manual but I could run the 3/8 mile paved oval in second gear (just bouncing off the rev limiter at the end of the straights). I found that left foot braking allowed me to go deeper in the corners and really dance on the edge of grip. Great times!

Every vehicle I own now has three pedals so I haven't tried left foot braking in years.
Buddy of mine in High School had a '96 Black Escort GT. Holy hell that thing was amazingly fun!!!! Honestly I'll look for them from time to time, but they are far an few between and most are beat to shit, rightfully so.
 

TeeLew

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