SRP Hex Pedals Installed

Demonic

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2017
Threads
19
Messages
1,089
Reaction score
1,159
Location
Boston
First Name
Austin
Vehicle(s)
GT350R
I placed SRP pedals order several weeks ago, and received them last week, and got them installed over the weekend. I know these have been mentioned and posted about before, but back when I was ordering I couldn't find much info on his newer Hex pattern pedals, so I wanted to post some pictures and report back.

Back when I first received my R, having gotten used to the floor mounted gas pedal and nice spacing for heel and toe in cars like the older M cars and the Porsches, I was a bit disappointed in the pedal setup for the GT350. With the combination of the Hillman nylon spacers from Lowes, and now these pedals, I'm thrilled. It's perfect for me, and looks killer. For those who haven't seen them mentioned before, in Lowes, you can usually find a set of Hillman nylon spacers in 1"x3/8"x3/8" that you can use to space the gas pedal so it sits further out and closer to the plane of the brake pedal. This was a big help, but still leaves the side gap between the gas and brake. When I went to order the SRP pedals I saw a picture Sullivan (SRP) had posted on Rennlist of the two tone hex grid. The two tone hex is $50 more than the regular SRP pedals: $25 extra for hex because of the added CNC time, and $25 for the anodizing. Part of why I wanted the this pattern was because none of the anodizing is on wear surfaces, so I don't have to be concerned about it getting worn down or scratched.

IMG_8335.jpg


The hardware is a set of 8-32 thread countersunk grad 10.9 hex bolts, and some self-tapping screws for the gas or dead pedal. I saw mentions of two people who during their install decided to tap and thread the holes for the clutch and brake pedal instead of using the lock nuts on the back. I actually planned to do the same originally. However I'm not sure if I'd still recommend that. The way the pedals sit against the metal plates, the screw holes are on a slight angle. This means that depending on the angle you end up tapping the holes for threads, there's very likely to be a shear force on the bolts, and shearing off a small bolt down inside one of those pedal plates would be a major pain to drill out and remove. So I passed on tapping for threads and just drilled straight holes.

I didn't bother taking pictures of the hole drilling, since it was basically the same as those who already posted pictures. The only thing I would add is that for the pattern of holes on these pedals, I found 3 holes to work best. When you pop off the original pedal cover, there's already one hole present towards the top of the pedal. The SRP instructions are to start with a 1/16" hole and then move to a 3/16". I started by enlarging the one pre-existing hole at the top to 7/32". I made it a hair larger than 3/16" because the factory hole is on an angled surface so making the hole slightly larger prevents the screw from binding. Then I put painters tape on the bottom part of the pedal, and placed that one screw through the pedal. The one screw then centers the pedal at the top, while you align the bottom. Mark the two holes onto the painters or masking tape. Then use a punch and hammer to punch the spots for the two pilot holes. I saw someone mention using a spring loaded punch. This wasn't necessary for me, as the pedals had enough natural resistance that a couple good taps on a regular punch marked the spot. I then used a cobalt bit for the pilot hole, and enlarged to 3/16" holes for those bottom two holes.

The gas pedal was a bit trickier. As others have mentioned, the curve of the SRP gas pedal doesn't exactly match the curve of the stock plastic gas pedal assembly. Furthermore, since the gas pedal is taller, the top edge of the new pedal contacts against the arm of the gas pedal. I used a hydraulic floor jack (remember to use something to protect the surface of the pedal) to press the pedal upward against a beam in the garage to slightly flatten out the pedal. This allowed it to better match the curvature and not be interfering with the arm. It appears Sullivan puts the pedals into a hydraulic press to make the curve, so I'm going to email him about this in the hopes that the arc can be corrected for anyone ordering these pedals for a Mustang/GT350.

I then attached the gas pedal to the assembly using the 8-32 threaded hex bolts instead of the self tapping screws. This required using a dremel and carbide bit to make some recesses for the nuts to sit flush on the back of the gas pedal since there's some ribbing there.

Inside garage with flash light:
IMG_8377.jpg


Outside with natural light:
IMG_8382.jpg

 

key01

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2017
Threads
9
Messages
1,213
Reaction score
1,134
Location
Chicagoland
Vehicle(s)
2017 GT350 now gone to a great home.
Looks great! One of the best mods I did as well to increase grip and better heal-toe access. That hex pattern is sweet.
 

MikeR397

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2017
Threads
18
Messages
579
Reaction score
364
Location
MI
Vehicle(s)
Ford GT350R & Raptor; Ferrari 360, Aston Martin Vantage, Porsche Cayenne GTS, Jaguar XFR
Ya heel toe is a little difficult to get right every time on the track. I did and auto blip unit to save my ankle when I don't feel like it.
 

Riverss26

Member
Joined
May 17, 2020
Threads
1
Messages
15
Reaction score
4
Location
Montreal
First Name
Martin
Vehicle(s)
Chevy Spark
I placed SRP pedals order several weeks ago, and received them last week, and got them installed over the weekend. I know these have been mentioned and posted about before, but back when I was ordering I couldn't find much info on his newer Hex pattern pedals, so I wanted to post some pictures and report back.

Back when I first received my R, having gotten used to the floor mounted gas pedal and nice spacing for heel and toe in cars like the older M cars and the Porsches, I was a bit disappointed in the pedal setup for the GT350. With the combination of the Hillman nylon spacers from Lowes, and now these pedals, I'm thrilled. It's perfect for me, and looks killer. For those who haven't seen them mentioned before, in Lowes, you can usually find a set of Hillman nylon spacers in 1"x3/8"x3/8" that you can use to space the gas pedal so it sits further out and closer to the plane of the brake pedal. This was a big help, but still leaves the side gap between the gas and brake. When I went to order the SRP pedals I saw a picture Sullivan (SRP) had posted on Rennlist of the two tone hex grid. The two tone hex is $50 more than the regular SRP pedals: $25 extra for hex because of the added CNC time, and $25 for the anodizing. Part of why I wanted the this pattern was because none of the anodizing is on wear surfaces, so I don't have to be concerned about it getting worn down or scratched.

IMG_8335.jpg


The hardware is a set of 8-32 thread countersunk grad 10.9 hex bolts, and some self-tapping screws for the gas or dead pedal. I saw mentions of two people who during their install decided to tap and thread the holes for the clutch and brake pedal instead of using the lock nuts on the back. I actually planned to do the same originally. However I'm not sure if I'd still recommend that. The way the pedals sit against the metal plates, the screw holes are on a slight angle. This means that depending on the angle you end up tapping the holes for threads, there's very likely to be a shear force on the bolts, and shearing off a small bolt down inside one of those pedal plates would be a major pain to drill out and remove. So I passed on tapping for threads and just drilled straight holes.

I didn't bother taking pictures of the hole drilling, since it was basically the same as those who already posted pictures. The only thing I would add is that for the pattern of holes on these pedals, I found 3 holes to work best. When you pop off the original pedal cover, there's already one hole present towards the top of the pedal. The SRP instructions are to start with a 1/16" hole and then move to a 3/16". I started by enlarging the one pre-existing hole at the top to 7/32". I made it a hair larger than 3/16" because the factory hole is on an angled surface so making the hole slightly larger prevents the screw from binding. Then I put painters tape on the bottom part of the pedal, and placed that one screw through the pedal. The one screw then centers the pedal at the top, while you align the bottom. Mark the two holes onto the painters or masking tape. Then use a punch and hammer to punch the spots for the two pilot holes. I saw someone mention using a spring loaded punch. This wasn't necessary for me, as the pedals had enough natural resistance that a couple good taps on a regular punch marked the spot. I then used a cobalt bit for the pilot hole, and enlarged to 3/16" holes for those bottom two holes.

The gas pedal was a bit trickier. As others have mentioned, the curve of the SRP gas pedal doesn't exactly match the curve of the stock plastic gas pedal assembly. Furthermore, since the gas pedal is taller, the top edge of the new pedal contacts against the arm of the gas pedal. I used a hydraulic floor jack (remember to use something to protect the surface of the pedal) to press the pedal upward against a beam in the garage to slightly flatten out the pedal. This allowed it to better match the curvature and not be interfering with the arm. It appears Sullivan puts the pedals into a hydraulic press to make the curve, so I'm going to email him about this in the hopes that the arc can be corrected for anyone ordering these pedals for a Mustang/GT350.

I then attached the gas pedal to the assembly using the 8-32 threaded hex bolts instead of the self tapping screws. This required using a dremel and carbide bit to make some recesses for the nuts to sit flush on the back of the gas pedal since there's some ribbing there.

Inside garage with flash light:
IMG_8377.jpg


Outside with natural light:
IMG_8382.jpg
This is great information. I recieved my SRP pedals over the Holidays and will be installing them sometime next month. Your experience will facilitate the install for sure! Question: At any point did you have to remove the pedal assembly for drilling, bending or dremel work?
Thanks!
 


Saxgod

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2021
Threads
9
Messages
143
Reaction score
106
Location
Texas
Vehicle(s)
2018 GT350, 2021 Bronco Sport Outerbanks
I placed SRP pedals order several weeks ago, and received them last week, and got them installed over the weekend. I know these have been mentioned and posted about before, but back when I was ordering I couldn't find much info on his newer Hex pattern pedals, so I wanted to post some pictures and report back.

Back when I first received my R, having gotten used to the floor mounted gas pedal and nice spacing for heel and toe in cars like the older M cars and the Porsches, I was a bit disappointed in the pedal setup for the GT350. With the combination of the Hillman nylon spacers from Lowes, and now these pedals, I'm thrilled. It's perfect for me, and looks killer. For those who haven't seen them mentioned before, in Lowes, you can usually find a set of Hillman nylon spacers in 1"x3/8"x3/8" that you can use to space the gas pedal so it sits further out and closer to the plane of the brake pedal. This was a big help, but still leaves the side gap between the gas and brake. When I went to order the SRP pedals I saw a picture Sullivan (SRP) had posted on Rennlist of the two tone hex grid. The two tone hex is $50 more than the regular SRP pedals: $25 extra for hex because of the added CNC time, and $25 for the anodizing. Part of why I wanted the this pattern was because none of the anodizing is on wear surfaces, so I don't have to be concerned about it getting worn down or scratched.

IMG_8335.jpg


The hardware is a set of 8-32 thread countersunk grad 10.9 hex bolts, and some self-tapping screws for the gas or dead pedal. I saw mentions of two people who during their install decided to tap and thread the holes for the clutch and brake pedal instead of using the lock nuts on the back. I actually planned to do the same originally. However I'm not sure if I'd still recommend that. The way the pedals sit against the metal plates, the screw holes are on a slight angle. This means that depending on the angle you end up tapping the holes for threads, there's very likely to be a shear force on the bolts, and shearing off a small bolt down inside one of those pedal plates would be a major pain to drill out and remove. So I passed on tapping for threads and just drilled straight holes.

I didn't bother taking pictures of the hole drilling, since it was basically the same as those who already posted pictures. The only thing I would add is that for the pattern of holes on these pedals, I found 3 holes to work best. When you pop off the original pedal cover, there's already one hole present towards the top of the pedal. The SRP instructions are to start with a 1/16" hole and then move to a 3/16". I started by enlarging the one pre-existing hole at the top to 7/32". I made it a hair larger than 3/16" because the factory hole is on an angled surface so making the hole slightly larger prevents the screw from binding. Then I put painters tape on the bottom part of the pedal, and placed that one screw through the pedal. The one screw then centers the pedal at the top, while you align the bottom. Mark the two holes onto the painters or masking tape. Then use a punch and hammer to punch the spots for the two pilot holes. I saw someone mention using a spring loaded punch. This wasn't necessary for me, as the pedals had enough natural resistance that a couple good taps on a regular punch marked the spot. I then used a cobalt bit for the pilot hole, and enlarged to 3/16" holes for those bottom two holes.

The gas pedal was a bit trickier. As others have mentioned, the curve of the SRP gas pedal doesn't exactly match the curve of the stock plastic gas pedal assembly. Furthermore, since the gas pedal is taller, the top edge of the new pedal contacts against the arm of the gas pedal. I used a hydraulic floor jack (remember to use something to protect the surface of the pedal) to press the pedal upward against a beam in the garage to slightly flatten out the pedal. This allowed it to better match the curvature and not be interfering with the arm. It appears Sullivan puts the pedals into a hydraulic press to make the curve, so I'm going to email him about this in the hopes that the arc can be corrected for anyone ordering these pedals for a Mustang/GT350.

I then attached the gas pedal to the assembly using the 8-32 threaded hex bolts instead of the self tapping screws. This required using a dremel and carbide bit to make some recesses for the nuts to sit flush on the back of the gas pedal since there's some ribbing there.

Inside garage with flash light:
IMG_8377.jpg


Outside with natural light:
IMG_8382.jpg
thanks for the pictures. these look fantastic. Definitely on my list now.
 
OP
OP
Demonic

Demonic

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2017
Threads
19
Messages
1,089
Reaction score
1,159
Location
Boston
First Name
Austin
Vehicle(s)
GT350R
This is great information. I recieved my SRP pedals over the Holidays and will be installing them sometime next month. Your experience will facilitate the install for sure! Question: At any point did you have to remove the pedal assembly for drilling, bending or dremel work?
Thanks!
The gas pedal assembly does come out but it's very easy, and a good time to add the nylon spacers onto the 3 studs if you decide to go that route at the same time.
 

Deadly0ne

Active Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2018
Threads
4
Messages
39
Reaction score
13
Location
OK, USA
Vehicle(s)
2020 GT350
I placed SRP pedals order several weeks ago, and received them last week, and got them installed over the weekend. I know these have been mentioned and posted about before, but back when I was ordering I couldn't find much info on his newer Hex pattern pedals, so I wanted to post some pictures and report back.

Back when I first received my R, having gotten used to the floor mounted gas pedal and nice spacing for heel and toe in cars like the older M cars and the Porsches, I was a bit disappointed in the pedal setup for the GT350. With the combination of the Hillman nylon spacers from Lowes, and now these pedals, I'm thrilled. It's perfect for me, and looks killer. For those who haven't seen them mentioned before, in Lowes, you can usually find a set of Hillman nylon spacers in 1"x3/8"x3/8" that you can use to space the gas pedal so it sits further out and closer to the plane of the brake pedal. This was a big help, but still leaves the side gap between the gas and brake. When I went to order the SRP pedals I saw a picture Sullivan (SRP) had posted on Rennlist of the two tone hex grid. The two tone hex is $50 more than the regular SRP pedals: $25 extra for hex because of the added CNC time, and $25 for the anodizing. Part of why I wanted the this pattern was because none of the anodizing is on wear surfaces, so I don't have to be concerned about it getting worn down or scratched.

IMG_8335.jpg


The hardware is a set of 8-32 thread countersunk grad 10.9 hex bolts, and some self-tapping screws for the gas or dead pedal. I saw mentions of two people who during their install decided to tap and thread the holes for the clutch and brake pedal instead of using the lock nuts on the back. I actually planned to do the same originally. However I'm not sure if I'd still recommend that. The way the pedals sit against the metal plates, the screw holes are on a slight angle. This means that depending on the angle you end up tapping the holes for threads, there's very likely to be a shear force on the bolts, and shearing off a small bolt down inside one of those pedal plates would be a major pain to drill out and remove. So I passed on tapping for threads and just drilled straight holes.

I didn't bother taking pictures of the hole drilling, since it was basically the same as those who already posted pictures. The only thing I would add is that for the pattern of holes on these pedals, I found 3 holes to work best. When you pop off the original pedal cover, there's already one hole present towards the top of the pedal. The SRP instructions are to start with a 1/16" hole and then move to a 3/16". I started by enlarging the one pre-existing hole at the top to 7/32". I made it a hair larger than 3/16" because the factory hole is on an angled surface so making the hole slightly larger prevents the screw from binding. Then I put painters tape on the bottom part of the pedal, and placed that one screw through the pedal. The one screw then centers the pedal at the top, while you align the bottom. Mark the two holes onto the painters or masking tape. Then use a punch and hammer to punch the spots for the two pilot holes. I saw someone mention using a spring loaded punch. This wasn't necessary for me, as the pedals had enough natural resistance that a couple good taps on a regular punch marked the spot. I then used a cobalt bit for the pilot hole, and enlarged to 3/16" holes for those bottom two holes.

The gas pedal was a bit trickier. As others have mentioned, the curve of the SRP gas pedal doesn't exactly match the curve of the stock plastic gas pedal assembly. Furthermore, since the gas pedal is taller, the top edge of the new pedal contacts against the arm of the gas pedal. I used a hydraulic floor jack (remember to use something to protect the surface of the pedal) to press the pedal upward against a beam in the garage to slightly flatten out the pedal. This allowed it to better match the curvature and not be interfering with the arm. It appears Sullivan puts the pedals into a hydraulic press to make the curve, so I'm going to email him about this in the hopes that the arc can be corrected for anyone ordering these pedals for a Mustang/GT350.

I then attached the gas pedal to the assembly using the 8-32 threaded hex bolts instead of the self tapping screws. This required using a dremel and carbide bit to make some recesses for the nuts to sit flush on the back of the gas pedal since there's some ribbing there.

Inside garage with flash light:
IMG_8377.jpg


Outside with natural light:
IMG_8382.jpg
Curious as to what size pedals you got? Looking to order some today but was unsure of the sizing - yours looks about perfect.
 
OP
OP
Demonic

Demonic

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2017
Threads
19
Messages
1,089
Reaction score
1,159
Location
Boston
First Name
Austin
Vehicle(s)
GT350R
I actually got the extra wide. As you can see our pedals are spaced far enough apart that even with the extra wide there's still enough space between the gas and brake. I wear size 9.5/10 shoes. If you're a considerably larger size you may want to consider the medium. Also remember for the gas pedal there's no exact spot to place it, giving you some wiggle room side to side.
 

Deadly0ne

Active Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2018
Threads
4
Messages
39
Reaction score
13
Location
OK, USA
Vehicle(s)
2020 GT350
I actually got the extra wide. As you can see our pedals are spaced far enough apart that even with the extra wide there's still enough space between the gas and brake. I wear size 9.5/10 shoes. If you're a considerably larger size you may want to consider the medium. Also remember for the gas pedal there's no exact spot to place it, giving you some wiggle room side to side.
Are these noticeably "grippier" than the stock pedals? I know SRP has pedals specifically for maximum traction, but I love the look of these.
 
OP
OP
Demonic

Demonic

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2017
Threads
19
Messages
1,089
Reaction score
1,159
Location
Boston
First Name
Austin
Vehicle(s)
GT350R
Are these noticeably "grippier" than the stock pedals? I know SRP has pedals specifically for maximum traction, but I love the look of these.
If you're referring to simple friction from sliding your foot across the pedal, then no, not really any more friction. But the fact that they're large solid surfaces gives a much better tactile feel. I had the same concern before getting them, but haven't given it a thought since installing them a few years ago.
 

honeybadger

Just don't care
Joined
Apr 20, 2016
Threads
57
Messages
3,384
Reaction score
5,259
Location
Texas
First Name
Kevin
Vehicle(s)
'17 GT350

mavisky

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2018
Threads
7
Messages
882
Reaction score
987
Location
Cumming, GA
First Name
Kyle
Vehicle(s)
2018 GT350
Suggest looking into their heel plates as well. Helps to protect the floor mats, especially if you have some of the nicer aftermarket sets.

I've had SRP on all of my Shelby's and I actually "drill" the hole with a small dremel grinder bit as it's tricky to get even a right angle drill into the area to drill the clutch and brake pedal.
 

 
22 - Velgen Wheels - 1
Top