Mustang Ecoboost HPP (High Performance Package) Modifications Log

ANS

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Mustang Ecoboost HPP Modifications (Bolt-ons with Cobb Off the shelf tune)

I have spent the past several months testing dozens of combinations of parts for the best drivability, reliability, and of course, performance. Given that the HPP edition is relatively new to the market, I did not find a lot of information so I ended up doing my own testing and came up with the following results and recommendations. I hope this may help any fellow HPP edition owners out there. I will post pictures up by tomorrow.

In no particular order:

1) Mishimoto Intercooler - I previously had the Cobb intercooler which was very impressive, however, I was given the opportunity to try a Fluidyne and Mishimoto intercooler and had great results with the Mishimoto. Originally I thought the Cobb would be better due to having a larger core but I was wrong. The Mishimoto surprisingly had better performance. My charge air temps decreased by 3-4 degrees over the Cobb. The Fluidyne is similar in performance to the Cobb. You can't go wrong with any of the options. I recommend staying with the factory charge pipes and replacing the Ford clamps with either Breeze or Comp Cam clamps which can hold more tension. Due to fluid dynamics, it is ideal for the hot side charge pipe to be as close in diameter to the turbo outlet as possible and gradually taper to the intercooler inlet unless you are running a larger turbo. I have not seen the following intercoolers in person, but going off of photos and specifications, they look like other great options: Garret 857564-6001, CVF Street Intercooler (reminds me of the Injen FM9200i), and the Speedfactory Intercooler. Mishimoto MMINT-MUS4-15 $600 + tax/shipping

2) 1320 Catted Downpipe w/3" Exhaust Adapter Add On Pipe - This item can be found on eBay. It is an identical replica of the now discontinued Cobb downpipe for the mustang ecoboost and will mate up with the Cobb catback exhaust. The build quality is excellent and proves price doesn't always translate to quality. I recommend purchasing a new "donut" gasket that goes between the downpipe and turbo when installing the new downpipe. You can order the gasket from your local Ford dealer. $400 + tax/shipping

3) Custom Exhaust w/Carven TR Mufflers (Still in progress) - I sold my modified Cobb exhaust to a friend of mine who just purchased a hpp ecoboost mustang. I figured it would give me the opportunity to try another route. I built a 3 inch to dual 3 inch y pipe adapter to go after the down pipe and ran dual 3 inch pipe right to underneath the rear hanger mounts near the diff. From there I built two s bent 3 inch pipes (one for each side) which terminate into the Carvon TR mufflers. I then used the Flowmaster 15402 exhaust tips which have a nice factory finish. The Carvon mufflers do an excellent job at minimizing the raspiness as well as mellowing out the tone. Overall the volume is loud on a cold start and at full throttle but very streetable during normal driving conditions. I used a pipe bender to save time instead of purchasing mandrel-bent tubing and cutting and welding section by section. So far I enjoy the exhaust fitment more than the old system. I need to make sure there is no drone on the highway by doing some more driving. I will update the results soon as well as pricing.

Old Exhaust when I started this thread: Cobb Catback Exhaust w/Modifications - This exhaust system will mate with the 1320 downpipe, however, it was originally designed for the normal mustang ecoboost, not the hpp edition. Due to this, the muffler tips are off center for the bumper. Since hiring a local mandrel bender and fabricating my own pipes would be just as expensive, I choose to use all of the Cobb piping up to the muffler location and then replaced the Cobb mufflers with new Flowmaster DBX mufflers which are specifically designed for 4 and 6 cylinder motors. The tone sounds great and is not over exaggerated. The part number is Flowmaster 12514310 and you can match it with the Jones Exhaust tip JST139 (parts are available from Summit Racing). If you have a non hpp edition, you do not need to change anything. $1,507 + tax/shipping and labor (if you are having to outsource welding the parts)

4) AWE Active Exhaust Plates and Dowels- The hpp edition came from the factory with an active exhaust setup. As of now, there are no defeat plugs nor has there been a simulation plate advertised to work with the factory valves. The computer will throw a code showing the active exhaust is not functioning unless you uninstall the valves from the factory exhaust and keep them connected to the vehicle. I spent hours searching for solutions. None of the Grimmspeed, MRT, ETS, etc. options would work because the hpp edition uses a completely different valve manufactured by SBS. I then found out that the new Toyota Supra uses the same SBS valve from the factory and came across AWE who includes a bypass plate in their kits for the Supra. I reached out to AWE and I was able to purchase the plates and dowel pins needed for us hpp owners to bypass the factory valves. Finally a solution. AWE was not aware of the compatibility of the parts and in turn, they do not manufacturer a kit specifically for this application. You will have to call AWE and ask for John Voss. Give him part numbers 150004 (valve simulator plate) and 98380A457 (dowel pin), you will need a quantity of two for both parts. $80-100 + tax/shipping

5) S&B 75-5143 Cold Air Intake - It is not hard to come across an aftermarket intake option for this car. A lot of the options appear to be cheaply manufactured, look thrown together, and seemed to be a downgrade from the factory airbox. Over the course of one weekend, I tested the Injen EVO9203, Airaid 454-326, S&B 75-5143 (w/oiled filter), Cobb 7M1100, Holley Intech 223-15, MAP Performance cold air, and the factory airbox with and without the Airaid replacement pipe and high flow filter. The S&B intake, MAP intake, Cobb intake, and factory airbox paired with a high flow filter and replacement Airaid pipe all performed very well. I preferred the looks and tone of the S&B over all of the options as I am not a fan of hearing the diverter valve working aka blow off valve noises. If you are a fan of blow off valve noises then the MAP intake would be right for you. $400 + tax/shipping

6) NGK 90495 Spark Plugs- Yes, this is the factory heat range. You do not need a colder spark plug. Cobb made their off the shelf maps based on the factory Ford spark plugs. With this setup, a colder spark plug will cause fouling, driveability issues and end up causing performance reductions. Over the course of one long weekend, I tried the following spark plugs at gaps of .024, .025, .026, .028, .030, and .032 (with all of the other modifications on this list, with the stage 3 93 octane Cobb tune): NGK 6509, NGK 6510, NGK 90495, OEM Motorcraft SP-550, Brisk Racing RR15S, Brisk Racing RR14YS, Brisk Racing RR14S, Denso ITV20, Denso ITV22, Autolite XP5863, and Autolite AI5863. The NGK 90495, when gapped to .028-.030 (I used .029), made the most power, revved the smoothest, and had the best drivability. The second best would be the OEM Motorcraft SP-550 gapped at .028-.030. I recommend replacing them every 15,000-20,000 miles (essentially every 3-4 oil changes, but it depends on your driving style) as they will wear faster with the tune. $45-55 + tax/shipping

7) Cobb Accessport - With all of the engine modifications you are now ready to jump straight to the stage 3 tune based on either 91 or 93 octane fuel. All of the modifications I have listed are catered to Cobbs off the shelf tunes. For more information on the Cobb tunes, I suggest you visit their website. $550 + tax/shipping

8) Boomba Racing Rear Vertical Links - This is one of the easiest suspension modifications you can perform to instantly help wheel hop and traction while under load. From a dead stop, the car noticeably performs better by keeping the rear end more stable and planted to the ground. I spent a couple of hours researching the vertical links before ordering the Boomba's because there have been many reports of noises occurring after installing other brands. I have not experienced any issues with the Boomba vertical links. I highly recommend them. $100-175 + tax/shipping (Depends if on sale)

9) JLT "Dirty Side/Driver Side" Catch Can - For such an inexpensive mod, it gives peace of mind knowing it may help protect your motor. Ford performance also makes an option for both the driver and passenger side, but the main focus is the driver side, where 90% of contamination occurs. I have compared the JLT to the Mishimoto option and found the JLT to be easier to install due to the factory Ford strut bar (comes standard on the hpp edition) causing clearance issues. The JLT fits perfectly because you can off center the mount in which the catch can be angled out from being directly underneath the strut bar. This makes it easier to service the catch can when emptying the contents. $150 + tax/shipping

Total parts cost is around $3,700-4,000 + tax/shipping and labor if needed


Random Notes:

With this setup, you can instantly enjoy your vehicle. There is no need to purchase a pro tune unless you are trying to extract more power but the results will be solely based upon the competency of the tuner. You may have to change parts to cater to your wants and your tuner needs. I imagine the only thing you really need to change is the spark plugs from the Denso ITV20 to the Denso ITV22 as they would be one step colder.

On the hpp ecoboost, you can install the Mishimoto, Fluidyne, and Cobb intercooler through the belly pan. There is no need to take the front bumper off.

I recommend using Breeze branded worm style clamps for all of your intake, turbo, and intercooler connections. Breeze clamps have proven to be robust compared to many other brands. When I have more time available, I will try to add part numbers. You can find them on Amazon.

Ford recommends using either 5w-50 or 0w-40 for the HPP edition. I use a high quality 0w-40 synthetic oil with a high quality filter and change my oil every 5,000 miles. I travel often and find that 5w-50 can take longer to warm up in colder climates. Most damage to a motor is done within the first 5 minutes after being started from a cold start by not letting the oil warm up. I have not had any 0w-40 oil breakdown however I do not push it past 5,000-6,000 mile intervals. I could probably go longer but need to perform another oil analysis.

If you have a manual transmission, I recommend changing the transmission fluid with a high quality synthetic option. You will find your shifts to be smoother and more engaging. I have not experimented with any transmission upgrades, however, I will in the near future. The MT-82 leaves a lot to be desired.

I noticed online, Ultimate Racing makes a similar replacement pipe to go between the factory air box and turbo inlet, but it is stainless steel compared to the Airaid replacement pipe plastic construction. I have never seen nor used one but it looks like a very nice option.

The Holley intake was a disaster, I couldn't fully install it due to fitment issues. I was disappointed with the manufacturing quality of the Airaid cold air intake as the plastic was easy to bend/flex. When installing the Airaid intake, make sure not to tighten the coupler to the velocity stack too much or it will deform easily. The Injen intake had excellent build quality, far better than the Airaid, however, it affected the throttle response in a negative manner. From my testing, the intakes that did the best either had a nice tapered pipe between the turbo inlet and air filter or stayed the same diameter the entire length of the pipe.

From my spark plug testing (by reading the spark plugs after being installed), I realized the cross reference heat range charts are not always accurate. The factory heat range NGK 6509 was by far a hotter plug than other OEM replacements, however, the NGK 90495 was spot on to the OEM heat range specification. The Brisk RR15S was too hot of a plug, and the RR14S and RR14YS were too cold. The Autolite XP5863 under full throttle experienced misfiring regardless of the gap and the Autolite AI5863 performed above average and showed to be in the correct heat range but left a lot to be desired with manufacturing consistency. The Denso IVT20 were ever so slightly too hot and the IVT22 were ever so slightly too cold.

The hpp edition comes from the factory with a Ford performance front k member brace and lower k member brace which comes stock on the convertible and gt performance packages. I experimented with adding an additional, 2 point, k member brace, and the results were very minimal. I ended up removing it and returning it. The best solution to minimize tramlining was having an alignment and replacing the OEM tires with a higher performance option.

There are a lot of modifications online that advertise power gains such as throttle body spacers, blow off valves/diverter valves upgrades, intercooler charge pipes, and so much more. While some of these items may help on highly modified setups, for most, they will not. In fact, they can decrease driveability and performance. For the newer mustang ecoboost vehicles, Ford revised the diverter valve (newer ones have an orange O-ring) and it rarely has any reliability or performance issues. If you are looking to change your throttle feel, then possibly going with a DV+ on one of the older diverter valves (yellow O-ring) may help, however, I have no experience with the DV+, this is based on my readings.


- David
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Vicr

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So you work for Cobb?
 

NicksGTR

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From the OP: "The Holley intake was a disaster, I couldn't fully install it due to fitment issues."
My experience exactly. I tried everything to get the air tube to fit inside the air filter seal, heat, lubrication, more heat. I gave up, next morning everything fit? :explode:
 
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ANS

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From the OP: "The Holley intake was a disaster, I couldn't fully install it due to fitment issues."
My experience exactly. I tried everything to get the air tube to fit inside the air filter seal, heat, lubrication, more heat. I gave up, next morning everything fit? :explode:
lol, I gave up after 10-15 minutes of trying to get the tube to fit into the air seal. It wasn't meant to be.
 

Cobra Jet

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Mustang Ecoboost HPP Modifications (Bolt-ons with Cobb Off the shelf tune)

I have spent the past several months testing dozens of combinations of parts for the best drivability, reliability, and of course, performance. Given that the HPP edition is relatively new to the market, I did not find a lot of information so I ended up doing my own testing and came up with the following results and recommendations. I hope this may help any fellow HPP edition owners out there. I will post pictures up by tomorrow.

In no particular order:

1) Cobb Intercooler - The Cobb intercooler has a large core and comes with a cold side charge pipe that matches the 3" diameter of the intercooler outlet and then tapers down to 2.75" at the throttle body. The Ford factory hot side charge pipe is ideal and should not be replaced unless you are upgrading to a larger turbo in the future. Due to fluid dynamics, it is ideal for the hot side charge pipe to be as close in diameter to the turbo outlet as possible and gradually taper to the intercooler inlet. You can get away with using another brand for the intercooler, however, be careful in your selection as all are not equal. I saw the Cobb intercooler sitting next to a Mishimoto intercooler and the Mishimoto core was noticeably more narrow. I have not seen the following intercoolers in person, but going off of photos and specifications, they look like worthy options: Garret 857564-6001, CVF Street Intercooler (reminds me of the Injen FM9200i), and the Speedfactory Intercooler. If you can afford to go with Cobb, I recommend it as the fitment and performance is excellent. $850 + tax/shipping

2) 1320 Catted Downpipe w/3" Exhaust Adapter Add On Pipe - This item can be found on eBay. It is an identical replica of the now discontinued Cobb downpipe for the mustang ecoboost and will mate up with the Cobb catback exhaust. The build quality is excellent and proves price doesn't always translate to quality. I recommend purchasing a new "donut" gasket that goes between the downpipe and turbo when installing the new downpipe. You can order the gasket from your local Ford dealer. $400 + tax/shipping

3) Cobb Catback Exhaust w/Modifications - This exhaust system will mate with the 1320 downpipe, however, it was originally designed for the normal mustang ecoboost, not the hpp edition. Due to this, the muffler tips are off center for the bumper. Since hiring a local mandrel bender and fabricating my own pipes would be just as expensive, I choose to use all of the Cobb piping up to the muffler location and then replaced the Cobb mufflers with new Flowmaster DBX mufflers which are specifically designed for 4 and 6 cylinder motors. The tone sounds great and is not over exaggerated. The part number is Flowmaster 12514310 and you can match it with the Jones Exhaust tip JST139 (parts are available from Summit Racing). If you have a non hpp edition, you do not need to change anything. $1,507 + tax/shipping and labor (if you are having to outsource welding the parts)

4) AWE Active Exhaust Plates and Dowels- The hpp edition came from the factory with an active exhaust setup. As of now, there are no defeat plugs nor has there been a simulation plate advertised to work with the factory valves. The computer will throw a code showing the active exhaust is not functioning unless you uninstall the valves from the factory exhaust and keep them connected to the vehicle. I spent hours searching for solutions. None of the Grimmspeed, MRT, ETS, etc. options would work because the hpp edition uses a completely different valve manufactured by SBS. I then found out that the new Toyota Supra uses the same SBS valve from the factory and came across AWE who includes a bypass plate in their kits for the Supra. I reached out to AWE and I was able to purchase the plates and dowel pins needed for us hpp owners to bypass the factory valves. Finally a solution. AWE was not aware of the compatibility of the parts and in turn, they do not manufacturer a kit specifically for this application. You will have to call AWE and ask for John Voss. Give him part numbers 150004 (valve simulator plate) and 98380A457 (dowel pin), you will need a quantity of two for both parts. $80-100 + tax/shipping

5) S&B 75-5143 Cold Air Intake - It is not hard to come across an aftermarket intake option for this car. A lot of the options appeared to be cheaply manufactured, look thrown together, and seemed to be a downgrade from the factory airbox. Over the course of one weekend, I tested the Injen EVO9203, Airaid 454-326, S&B 75-5143 (w/oiled filter), Cobb 7M1100, Holley Intech 223-15, MAP Performance cold air, and the factory airbox with and without the Airaid replacement pipe and high flow filter. The S&B intake, MAP intake, Cobb intake, and factory airbox paired with a high flow filter and replacement Airaid pipe all performed very well. I preferred the looks and tone of the S&B over all of the options. I am not a fan of hearing the diverter valve working aka blow off valve noises, however, if you are then the MAP intake would be right for you. $400 + tax/shipping

6) Denso ITV20 Spark Plugs- Yes, this is the factory heat range. You do not need a colder spark plug. Cobb made their off the shelf maps based on the factory Ford spark plugs. With this setup, a colder spark plug will cause fouling, driveability issues and end up causing performance reductions. Over the course of one long weekend, I tried the following spark plugs at gaps of .024, .025, .026, .028, .030, and .032 (with all of the other modifications on this list, with the stage 3 93 octane Cobb tune): NGK 6509, NGK 6510, NGK 90495, OEM Motorcraft SP-550, Brisk Racing RR15S, Brisk Racing RR14YS, Brisk Racing RR14S, Denso ITV20, Denso ITV22, Autolite XP5863, and Autolite AI5863. The Denso ITV20, when gapped to .025, made the most power, revved the smoothest, and had the best drivability. The second best would be the NGK 90495 gapped at .026-.028. I recommend replacing them every 10,000-20,000 miles (essentially every 2-4 oil changes, but it depends on your driving style) as they will wear faster with the tune. I found the Denso website to have the best pricing and they shipped extremely fast. $40 + tax/shipping

7) Cobb Accessport - With all of the engine modifications you are now ready to jump straight to the stage 3 tune based on either 91 or 93 octane fuel. All of the modifications I have listed are catered to Cobbs off the shelf tunes. For more information on the Cobb tunes, I suggest you visit their website. $550 + tax/shipping

8) Boomba Racing Rear Vertical Links - This is one of the easiest suspension modifications you can perform to instantly help wheel hop and traction while under load. From a dead stop, the car noticeably performs better by keeping the rear end more stable and planted to the ground. I spent a couple of hours researching the vertical links before ordering the Boomba's because there have been many reports of noises occurring after installing other brands. I have not experienced any issues with the Boomba vertical links. I highly recommend them. $100-175 + tax/shipping (Depends if on sale)

9) JLT "Dirty Side/Driver Side" Catch Can - For such an inexpensive mod, it gives peace of mind knowing it may help protect your motor. Ford performance also makes an option for both the driver and passenger side, but the main focus is the driver side, where 90% of contamination occurs. I have compared the JLT to the Mishimoto option and found the JLT to be easier to install due to the factory Ford strut bar (comes standard on the hpp edition) causing clearance issues. The JLT fits perfectly because you can off center the mount in which the catch can be angled out from being directly underneath the strut bar. This makes it easier to service the catch can when emptying the contents. $150 + tax/shipping

Total parts cost is around $3,800-4,200 + tax/shipping and labor if needed


Random Notes:

With this setup, you can instantly enjoy your vehicle. There is no need to purchase a pro tune unless you are trying to extract more power but the results will be solely based upon the competency of the tuner. You may have to change parts to cater to your wants and your tuner needs. I imagine the only thing you really need to change is the spark plugs from the Denso ITV20 to the Denso ITV22 as they would be one step colder.

I recommend using Breeze branded worm style clamps for all of your intake, turbo, and intercooler connections. Breeze clamps have proven to be robust compared to many other brands. When I have more time available, I will try to add part numbers. You can find them on Amazon.

Ford recommends using either 5w-50 or 0w-40 for the HPP edition. I use a high quality 0w-40 synthetic oil with a high quality filter and change my oil every 5,000 miles. I travel often and find that 5w-50 can take longer to warm up in colder climates. Most damage to a motor is done within the first 5 minutes after being started from a cold start by not letting the oil warm up. I have not had any 0w-40 oil breakdown however I do not push it past 5,000-6,000 mile intervals. I could probably go longer but need to perform another oil analysis.

If you have a manual transmission, I recommend changing the transmission fluid with a high quality synthetic option. You will find your shifts to be smoother and more engaging.

I noticed online, Ultimate Racing makes a similar replacement pipe to go between the factory air box and turbo inlet, but it is stainless steel compared to the Airaid replacement pipe plastic construction. I have never seen nor used one but it looks like a very nice option.

The Holley intake was a disaster, I couldn't fully install it due to fitment issues. I was disappointed with the manufacturing quality of the Airaid cold air intake as the plastic was easy to bend/flex. When installing the Airaid intake, make sure not to tighten the coupler to the velocity stack too much or it will deform easily. The Injen intake had excellent build quality, far better than the Airaid, however, it affected the throttle response in a negative manner. From my testing, the intakes that did the best all had either a nice tapered pipe between the turbo inlet and air filter, or stayed the same diameter the entire length of the pipe.

From my spark plug testing (by reading the spark plugs after being installed), I realized the cross reference heat range charts are not always accurate. The factory heat range NGK 6509 was by far a hotter plug than other OEM replacements, however, the NGK 90495 was much closer to the OEM heat range specification. The Brisk RR15S was too hot of a plug, and the RR14S and RR14YS were too cold. The Autolite XP5863 under full throttle experienced misfiring regardless of the gap and the Autolite AI5863 performed above average and showed to be in the correct heat range but left a lot to be desired with manufacturing consistency. The Denso IVT20 and NGK 90495 performed better than the factory Ford spark plug.

There are a lot of modifications online that advertise power gains such as throttle body spacers, blow off valves/diverter valves upgrades, intercooler charge pipes, and so much more. While some of these items may help on highly modified setups, for most, they will not. In fact, they can decrease driveability and performance. For the newer mustang ecoboost vehicles, Ford revised the diverter valve (newer ones have an orange O-ring) and it rarely has any reliability or performance issues. If you are looking to change your throttle feel, then possibly going with a DV+ on one of the older diverter valves (yellow O-ring) may help, however, I have no experience with the DV+, this is based on my readings.


- David
Great Tech thread with lots of good info!

Thanks for sharing your experiences, as there are not many EB HPP threads on this site, so it’s really beneficial.
 
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FreePenguin

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Good to know about the plugs, I actually run the NGK 90495 plugs you using as well, and it runs great. I also recently put my oem bov back on, and I do recall it having orange o ring, I could be wrong. but I think it did. was they orange in 2017? it was either black or orange. I cannot recall. I dont have a HPP, but I do feel your guide is nice for other HPP owners. if I had a HPP I'd do the mods day 1 and be done.
 
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ANS

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Good to know about the plugs, I actually run the NGK 90495 plugs you using as well, and it runs great. I also recently put my oem bov back on, and I do recall it having orange o ring, I could be wrong. but I think it did. was they orange in 2017? it was either black or orange. I cannot recall. I dont have a HPP, but I do feel your guide is nice for other HPP owners. if I had a HPP I'd do the mods day 1 and be done.
I am not sure on the exact year when Ford did the revision but I believe it was around 2018. The old diverter valve had a yellow o-ring. The NGK 90495 are awesome plugs and I would run them as well. They are very close in performance to the Denso. Thank you, I hope this guide may help some hpp owners.
 

Hi-PO Stang

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Great thread. Lots of effort and thought put into evaluation of parts by OP. I don't notice any trammeling with factory tires on Minnesota roads. I wonder what kind of surface roads have in other states.
 
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ANS

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As I was going through the leftover spark plugs from all of my tests I saw that two of the four Brisk RR15S had hairline cracks in the ceramic which could have accounted for the issues I had with them. I am going to exchange them this weekend and redo the test with them.
 
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ANS

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Great thread. Lots of effort and thought put into evaluation of parts by OP. I don't notice any trammeling with factory tires on Minnesota roads. I wonder what kind of surface roads have in other states.
Thank you, I hope others will contribute their experiences. We can all learn more about the platform from real-world testing. I live in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. The roads here can be very bad. I may try a four-point brace to see if it helps but I worry that it may be too much stress on the chassis of the vehicle.
 
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I retested the Brisk RR15S and had similar results. They run too hot. Also, if anyone needs any free spark plugs please let me know. Someone may have a use for them. You would just pay shipping. I have the following up for grabs:

Brisk RR15S
Brisk RR14YS
Autolite AI5863

They were all used in the testing I performed and have been cleaned as well as possible. I was able to return the others.
 
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Here are some pics, as you see, other than the intake, it looks fairly stock which was a goal of mine. It needs a wash bad lol

IMG_20210616_182643.jpg

IMG_20210616_182630.jpg
 
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I have made some changes to the original post as I have been tinkering some more this past week. I ended up selling the modified Cobb exhaust to a friend and have been building a new exhaust. I also switched out the Cobb intercooler to the Mishimoto I had on hand and was surprised with the results.
 
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This is just the type of information i was looking for! Tks so much for taking the time to post your thoughts !!!!
 
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