Fitting Guide: 2020 GT500 Cam Covers and GT500 Oil Separator with a Roush Supercharger

The_Fireball

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Recently fitted a Roush kit to a 2017 GT, and while it was apart decided to also install the 2020 GT500 aluminium covers (M-6067-M52S) and oil separator (M-6766-A52). Big fan of going OEM, which was a big driver for going this route instead of other options out there. Figured I'd add some pictures and notes for anyone else thinking of doing this too.

Besides the covers and separator, I realised when I started the install that I'd need some studded cam cover bolts. These are needed to mount the separator to the cam cover, and are already present on the GT500 even if it didn't come with the separator. Frustratingly, this wasn't stated at the time when I ordered the parts, with the Ford Performance and reseller websites (LMR, AM etc) all stating that all you need to add the separator to a standard 2015-2017 GT or GT350 is the GT500 covers. More frustratingly, when I emailed Ford Performance techline about this (twice) a few weeks ago to ask if they were aware and ask for the bolt part numbers, I received no response at all. I've noticed today that FP have now updated their page to mention "Requires three W720840-S437 bolts from Ford dealer", so it would seem the message got through, but a response to the info and help request would have been nice.

Anyway, rant over, onto the pics/guide:

The cam covers fit as usual, and are a direct replacement for the original plastic ones. Three of the original bolts need leaving out, so that the studded versions can be added:
PXL_20210612_172144531.jpg


As I didn't have the stud part number at the time, I had to improvise. The parts guy at the local Ford couldn't get the GT500 up on the system to look up the studded bolts, as it's not sold over here in the UK. Instead I went for some similar looking bolts from a transit diesel cam cover, and figured some customisation might be needed.

They were a bit too long and the thread wasn't going to engage the entire threaded part of the head. Using a tap and die kit I extended the threads, then used a Dremel to trim the bolts down a bit. Here you can see the original bolts, and the modified bolt after the tap and die (they're not trimmed in length here though). The thread looks a bit rough in the photo, but the thread was stable and pulled in well even with a few fittings.
PXL_20210612_172353166.jpg


Once these were in, the frame could be mounted and it was business as usual. I just needed some nuts for the top as the set applied with the separator were too small due to using custom bolts.
PXL_20210613_090304673.jpg

PXL_20210613_090254138.jpg


I won't post the separator fitting steps as others have covered that and Ford provide these online.

The next challenge is the PCV pipework. The standard 2020 GT500 PCV purge hose fits around the front of the Supercharger, where as the 2015-2017 Roush has the fitting around the back, as well as a return hose in the rear middle of the Supercharger. The standard Roush pipework is like this (taken from the Roush installation guide):
PCV Purge Hose.JPG


As the output from the separator points towards the front of the engine, the PCV pipe needs to turn 180 degrees to go back to meet that T junction. I tried some flexible Aeroquip fc598-10 pipe which was pretty stiff and vacuum rated (although this is always taking pressure out of the crank case), but to get it to turn that sharply without kinking wasn't really possible without a very wide arc.

To make it look as OEM as possible, I instead heated up some of the original factory hard plastic PCV hoses, to remove the connectors and reuse one of the pipes that looked like it'd fit. With the pipes warmed up was able to refit the factory pipe directly to the Roush T piece and a factory 90 degree fitting. As this brings everything closer to the Supercharger, I then opted to use the Aeroquip pipe for the short 2" piece needed from the T piece to the inlet plus some clamps:
PXL_20210623_190512280.jpg

PXL_20210623_190506707.jpg

PXL_20210617_191633198.jpg


Due to being mid-Supercharger install, the K brace wasn't fitted at this point, which helped a lot with the fitting too.
PXL_20210615_200225902.jpg
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PXL_20210615_200231751.jpg


Hope that helps someone else looking at fitting these parts with a Roush install. Happy with the final result, no excess pressure on any of the connectors and no leaks, plus the factory fit look!

 

Whitedevil95

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Nice work. Looks great.
 

Strokerswild

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How bad was the installation of the cam covers themselves?

A buddy wants to put them on his '16 GT/CS (without the oil separator) and I'll likely be the wrench. At a glance, using my '15 as a guide, it doesn't look too bad. But I know how these things go....
 
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The_Fireball

The_Fireball

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How bad was the installation of the cam covers themselves?

A buddy wants to put them on his '16 GT/CS (without the oil separator) and I'll likely be the wrench. At a glance, using my '15 as a guide, it doesn't look too bad. But I know how these things go....
Very straightforward comparatively to everything else. Just torque it all up to the right settings and you'll be fine. You'll need some liquid gasket too, but that's all in the instructions.

Plus remember to remove the dipstick tube before the covers or it snaps right off! Seems that's caught a few people out.
 

Strokerswild

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Very straightforward comparatively to everything else. Just torque it all up to the right settings and you'll be fine. You'll need some liquid gasket too, but that's all in the instructions.

Plus remember to remove the dipstick tube before the covers or it snaps right off! Seems that's caught a few people out.
The dipstick tube just pulls out, correct?
 


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The_Fireball

The_Fireball

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The dipstick tube just pulls out, correct?
Once the dipstick itself is out, just rotate the tube left and it corkscrews out. About half a turn, it's easy enough. There's a little plastic tab preventing it rotating, just push that in. It does a pretty crap job as I can rotate mine freely regardless 😂
 

luc

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You have to remove the battery box metal panel to get to the rear corner nuts/bolts of the right rear cover.
The wiring harness plastic push pins at the back of the covers are not the most fun thing to do
That was on my 17
 
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The_Fireball

The_Fireball

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You have to remove the battery box metal panel to get to the rear corner nuts/bolts of the right rear cover.
The wiring harness plastic push pins at the back of the covers are not the most fun thing to do
That was on my 17
That's a good shout; the wiring harness pins were not fun. I'd forgotten about them. I was able to get away with a universal joint on the socket set for the rear bolts but they are a frustrating operation. That said, RHD so things a little different with angles.
 

 
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