First hand experience with Steeda coilovers?

Discussion in 'Suspension, Brakes & Chassis' started by skinnysaurus, May 20, 2020.

  1. skinnysaurus

    skinnysaurus Well-Known Member

    Vehicle(s):
    2017 Mustang GT PP
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2016
    Location:
    NJ
    Posts:
    125
    Likes Received:
    39
    0   0   0
    There seems to be a dearth of reviews for Steeda’s coilovers compared to a lot of other suspension setups.

    Anyone have any first hand experience with Steeda coilovers, either recommendations, caution and experience/comfort for a DD and spirited driving.

    I don’t track but the only reason I’m considering coilovers is I have no idea of the best height and dampening I need. I’m willing to pay more to have adjustability options.
     
  2. Brian@BMVK

    [email protected] Well-Known Member

    Vehicle(s):
    2015 GT
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2020
    Location:
    Illinois
    Posts:
    507
    Likes Received:
    356
    0   0   0
    Be careful what you wish for regarding adjustability. It can be a blessing and a curse. The only real reason, IMO, to get coilovers is to get spring rates that you cannot, or to be able to do corner balancing with stock-style lowering spring + strut & shock setups. That's really it. There are amazingly good dampers available with the nicer coilover setups, but probably out of your budget.

    If you want a really good handling and good looking street car, there are lots of great options w/o going to coilovers.
     
    Roadway 5.0 and Norm Peterson like this.
  3. Norm Peterson

    Norm Peterson corner barstool sitter

    First Name:
    Norm
    Vehicle(s):
    '08 GT #85, '19 WRX, '01 20AE
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2013
    Location:
    On a corner barstool not too far from I-95
    Posts:
    6,715
    Likes Received:
    2,802
    0   0   0
    Best functional ride height is probably going to be somewhere between stock and some minimal amount of lowering, with springs having a mild to moderate rate increase above stock. Save adjustability for the dampers, and for the sta-bars if you decide to include bars to the mix. I'm intentionally staying away from matters of subjective appearance, given that common appearance preferences frequently work at cross-purposes to function.

    You can get lost in an array of adjustments if you give yourself too many of them and insist on constantly tinkering with them (either simply because you can or because of some feeling that you have to keep messing with them in order to justify having paid for the capability).


    Norm
     
  4. OP
    OP
    skinnysaurus

    skinnysaurus Well-Known Member

    Vehicle(s):
    2017 Mustang GT PP
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2016
    Location:
    NJ
    Posts:
    125
    Likes Received:
    39
    0   0   0
    Thanks. Some good perspective. Going to keep looking into other options.
     
  5. BluePonyGT

    BluePonyGT Well-Known Member

    First Name:
    Corey
    Vehicle(s):
    2017 Grabber Blue GT Premium 6MT
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2018
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Posts:
    341
    Likes Received:
    146
    0   0   0
    There's going to be trade-offs on any setup, and I'm learning that with this car there's no exceptions to that rule. Coil-overs are great if you want to be able to adjust ride height, but spring rate is going to be different just like what's been said here already. I started out in the coil-over crowd but then after some research found out they would be significantly more expensive, and most of the lowering thresholds from other options frankly weren't that extreme for what I wanted. The car is also going to handle differently, feel differently, and in some cases not drive very well at all, but that's where finding your magic adjustments is going to take some time.

    I chose to make my adjustments in the shocks/struts, tow, camber and sway bar ends. That's good enough. I decided setting ride height wasn't something I really needed to do a lot of, so I put my money elsewhere.
     
    skinnysaurus likes this.
Loading...

Share This Page