Why no Adaptive Steering???

Commbubba19

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Ford released adaptive steering in 2016 for the Ford Edge and 17 Super Duty.

Honestly...I love it in the Edge.

I really expected it to be pushed to more models like the 18 refresh of the Explorer, Mustang, and F-150.

But nope.

:shrug:

 

wireeater

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Because it's not a luxury cruiser? It's a sports car with some comfort amenities. I'd have to imagine having a system like that would damper the steering response for a car that you'd want the best road feedback and performance. I guess my question before stuffing my foot in my mouth completely is, what other sports cars have it?
 

williamwally

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The want for features like these is why they should make a Lincoln version. Adaptive everything, soft touch everything, panoramic sunroof, bigger backseats, turbo v6 etc.
 

Kevin08

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Wait, does it not do that already? I thought the drive modes impacted the EPS.
 


MrCincinnati

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I guess my question before stuffing my foot in my mouth completely is, what other sports cars have it?
Not sure about sports cars, but sport mode in SRT chargers and Challengers uses something similar. Normal and Track mode don’t, though
 

Colleton

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What do you mean by adaptive steering?

The 2011/2012 GT500 was the 1st Mustang to get EPAS, and it worked differently than the EPAS in the 2013+ cars. At low speeds (think parking lot) the the steering was very easy, while at high speeds the steering was very stiff. Steering effort varied with speed.

Is that what you're talking about? Ford ditched that in favor of user selectable steering modes (2013/2014 GT500) and finally user selectable driving modes in 2015. If so, I'm on your side. I really liked the adaptive steering effort/feel of my 2011 GT500.
 

DickR

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The S550 already has "adaptive steering" as part of EPAS according to Factory Service Manual.

EPAS System

The PSCM controls the functions of the EPAS system and communicates with other modules over the HS-CAN2 .

To activate, the EPAS system requires battery voltage at the hot at all times PSCM input, battery voltage at the PSCM ignition-run input, the PSCM must communicate with other modules over the HS-CAN2 and the PSCM must receive both the power pack status message from the PCM .

The main input for calculating the level of EPAS assist is the steering torque sensor signal (internal to the PSCM ). Vehicle speed is also taken into consideration in order to achieve the vehicle speed dependent steering assist characteristic.

The EPAS gear uses a reversible motor to apply the steering assist by moving the rack inside the steering gear. The motor is connected to the rack of the steering gear by a toothed belt and pulley-bearing assembly.

The PSCM continually monitors and adjusts steering efforts based on the steering torque sensor signal, motor position and HS-CAN2 inputs to enhance the feel of the steering system. As vehicle speed increases, the amount of assist decreases to improve and enhance road feel at the steering wheel. As vehicle speed decreases, the amount of assist increases to ease vehicle maneuvering. Compensation is made to reduce the effect of pull or drift experienced when driving on roads with a high degree of camber. Compensation is also made for the impact of wheel imbalance on steering feel, up to a predetermined threshold.

The steering torque sensor senses the torque at the steering wheel. It is integrated into the PSCM and works by measuring the relative rotation between an input and output shaft which are connected by a torsion bar. The steering torque sensor sends out 2 PWM signals which allows a channel to channel cross-check and an accurate correction of the neutral point.

The PSCM is self-monitoring and is capable of setting and storing Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs). Depending on the DTC set, the PSCM may enter a failure mode. In addition, the PSCM may send a request to the IPC to display a message in the message center, alerting the driver of a potential EPAS concern. The warning message is sent over the HS-CAN2 to the GWM which relays the message to the IPC over the HS-CAN3 .
And:

Selectable Steering

The selectable steering button on the FCIM allows the driver to select 1 of 3 steering modes. These steering modes alter the feel and response of the EPAS system. After a selection is made, a soft feedback bump may be felt in the steering wheel. Pressing the switch causes the FCIM to send a message to the IPC and the PSCM . The IPC displays the current mode in the message center and the PSCM modifies EPAS operation according to the selected steering mode.

Standard : Default system setting. The system defaults to standard mode if the battery is disconnected.
Sport : Slightly higher effort required for steering with more road feel through the steering wheel.
Comfort : Slightly less effort required for steering with less road feel through the steering wheel.
If the vehicle is equipped with the selectable drive mode feature, the steering feel changes when a new drive mode is selected. This automatic selection can be overridden by using the selectable steering button. For additional information on the selectable drive mode feature,
Refer to: Anti-Lock Brake System (ABS) and Stability Control - System Operation and Component Description (206-09 Anti-Lock Brake System (ABS) and Stability Control, Description and Operation).
 

tsunami

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Variable power steering more than 40 years ago

My 1972 Mach I had variable power steering. Light touch at low speed and stiffer feel on the highway.
 

TheReaper

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What do you mean by adaptive steering?

The 2011/2012 GT was the 1st Mustang to get EPAS, and it worked differently than the EPAS in the 2013+ cars. At low speeds (think parking lot) the the steering was very easy, while at high speeds the steering was very stiff. Steering effort varied with speed.

Is that what you're talking about? Ford ditched that in favor of user selectable steering modes (2013/2014 GT) and finally user selectable driving modes in 2015. If so, I'm on your side. I really liked the adaptive steering effort/feel of my 2011 GT500.
Fixed it for you.
 

PortalMaker

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OP mentioned the Edge. The Adaptive Steering is standard on the Edge Sport and available on the Edge Titanium. It's also available on Super Duties with Lariat trim or higher... typically as part of an ultimate trailer tow package.

The way it works; The system requires less steering effort at all times. When steering, one full turn/spin of the wheel to one side would be the equivalent of 2 full turns/spins in a regular vehicle. It's great in the Super Duties if you're hauling a trailer as it allows you to put in way less steering effort for that extra length you've added to your vehicle. It is not like the Mustang's current EPAS system, which also has the steering modes that can be toggled through.

As mentioned before, this would probably be nice in a Lincoln (luxury cruiser) version of the Mustang. But I don't think most people buying a Mustang today would care for it.
 

BmacIL

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Please no.

What I would want is shorter ratio than 16:1. Something closer to the Focus ST.
 

65Terdlingua

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Adaptive Steering is not the same as steering settings for the EPAS. The settings in the Mustang just change how much effort the EPAS provides. Adaptive steering actually has a gearset in the steering wheel that is driven by a small motor. At low speeds, it multiplies the driver input by running this motor one direction, so the output is 1.x times more rotation to the rack. At higher speeds, the motor drives the opposite direction to reduce the rotation at the rack compared to the driver input by 0.x times.
 

 
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