Will the V8 still be offered in a few years?

aerodyn

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V8's aren't going anywhere as long as enough 4 cylinder and electric cars are sold to balance out and meet CAFE standards. Can you imagine a V6 Raptor?
I don't need to imagine it, the 2017 Raptor has a twin-turbo V6.

Seems pretty obvious that engine will end up in the Mustang.





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Zelek

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I'd rather have a 430 HP V8 than a 600 HP Twin Turbo V6 because one simply sounds more amazing than the other. That's more than enough horsepower for the road. 600 HP is just ridiculous. Not saying the Twin V6 wouldn't be awesome, but there's just a unique sound of the Coyote I really like. Not to mention, upkeep on a turbo engine can also not be fun.
 

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Look at it this way - if the V8 goes away you can always buy last year's model. So there's not much reason to worry about it.

I sure hope V8s don't go away in my lifetime. If so, I could be all done buying new cars. Luckily there are a ton of used ones out there.

Now if the politicians get bribed into taking our fuel away - then it will be time to revolt! ;)

Isn't everything on planet earth an finite resource?
Not only that, but everything everywhere is finite. When they first discovered oil scientists were aware of approximately 80-90 years' worth of reserves in the ground. Every year since then new discoveries have caused the predicted reserves to expand, outpacing the rate of use, which is also increasing. I believe current known reserves are around 300+ years.
 

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Voodooo

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The v8 days are numbered. I guarantee it. Look at the F150. Only v8 offered is the 5.0 everything else is a v6. With the econoline gone and the full size transit van here they only offer v6 engines available in v6 gas, ecoboost and v6 turbo diesel. The new ford GT is a 3.5 ecoboost. Ford does not offer a v8 in any car except the mustang. The days of every car model having the option of a v8 is long gone. The v8 days are numbered. Mark my words, the question should be "when will the v8 die"??
 

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Not only that, but everything everywhere is finite.
Our universe is infinitely expanding as far as we can observe. Resources exist within said possible infinite space, so in theory there are infinite resources.

/sarcasm, but seriousness as well :shrug:
 

Voodooo

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I'd rather have a 430 HP V8 than a 600 HP Twin Turbo V6 because one simply sounds more amazing than the other. That's more than enough horsepower for the road. 600 HP is just ridiculous. Not saying the Twin V6 wouldn't be awesome, but there's just a unique sound of the Coyote I really like. Not to mention, upkeep on a turbo engine can also not be fun.
Car manufacturers are not going to keep a v8 just because people like the sound. I agree the v8 is a great sounding man made mechanical wonder, but I'll take a 600hp v6 over a 430hp v8.
Example. Would you take the 2005-2006 GT over the 2017 GT? I'll take the 2017.
 

sauerkraut

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You told me to leave science to scientists when I work in the chemical industry.

The real question is what point were you trying to make?

You seem to be completely missing the point I was originally making. Synthetic fuels must be produced/manufactured, which requires energy (which comes from a fuel source) in the first place. Read your own link, the parts for Audi's e-fuels still need to be produced/grown and combined with other finite elements/resources.

Using fuel to produce fuel is circular. You cannot have your cake an eat it too.
 

Maggneto

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You told me to leave science to scientists when I work in the chemical industry.

The real question is what point were you trying to make?

You seem to be completely missing the point I was originally making. Synthetic fuels must be produced/manufactured, which requires energy (which comes from a fuel source) in the first place. Read your own link, the parts for Audi's e-fuels still need to be produced/grown and combined with other finite elements/resources.

Using fuel to produce fuel is circular. You cannot have your cake an eat it too.
What the hell are you freaking talking about? I said when Oil stops coming out of the ground there will be Synthetic fuel and you jumped in like madman screaming about Telsa's and someone doesn't know what Synthetic means, I am a Scientist blah, blah blah.

Take 2 steps back, take a deep breath, give Audi a call and have a little chat with them about the Synthetic fuel. :frusty:
 

sauerkraut

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What the hell are you freaking talking about? I said when Oil stops coming out of the ground there will be Synthetic fuel and you jumped in like madman screaming about Telsa's and someone doesn't know what Synthetic means, I am a Scientist blah, blah blah.

Take 2 steps back, take a deep breath, give Audi a call and have a little chat with them about the Synthetic fuel. :frusty:
Calm down. All I'm saying is synthetic fuel is not going to save the V8 (which was your obvious assertion). I highly doubt synthetic fuel cars will be anything like a traditional gas powered V8 (you know, the sound everyone seems to be worried about). If anything, they'll probably be smaller since they can be more efficient than a gas engine.

Screaming, come on; I made a passing comment. Not sure why that struck a nerve, unless you own a Tesla with "I'm saving the world" vanity plates. :shrug:
 

BmacIL

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Car manufacturers are not going to keep a v8 just because people like the sound. I agree the v8 is a great sounding man made mechanical wonder, but I'll take a 600hp v6 over a 430hp v8.
Example. Would you take the 2005-2006 GT over the 2017 GT? I'll take the 2017.
A 600 hp TT V6 would most definitely have higher fuel consumption compared with a 430 hp NA V8. A 430 hp TT V6 would have comparable/similar real world fuel economy, but would be slightly better than the V8 with our current fuel economy testing regulations. The testing/drive cycle does not yet represent real world fuel economy for turbocharged engines very well. The EPA and others are catching on to this.

In my time in the industry, I was pushing for improvements to actual, real world fuel economy that the customer would reap the benefits of (weirdly, would also improve the EPA numbers! :doh: :tsk: )
 

Voodooo

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A 600 hp TT V6 would most definitely have higher fuel consumption compared with a 430 hp NA V8. A 430 hp TT V6 would have comparable/similar real world fuel economy, but would be slightly better than the V8 with our current fuel economy testing regulations. The testing/drive cycle does not yet represent real world fuel economy for turbocharged engines very well. The EPA and others are catching on to this.

In my time in the industry, I was pushing for improvements to actual, real world fuel economy that the customer would reap the benefits of (weirdly, would also improve the EPA numbers! :doh: :tsk: )
I don't care about EPA OR MPG. But you can not dismiss the facts. Larger engines are on the way out like it or not. It's a proven fact. When's the last time you seen a big block in a car? dont tell me the 6.2 or 6.4L is a big block either. Big v8's and small v8's are becoming a thing of the past. Cars will and are gettig smaller and so are the engines. It's already here. I'll put my yearly income in it. In less then 10 years ford won't have a v8 car.
 

BmacIL

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I don't care about EPA OR MPG. But you can not dismiss the facts. Larger engines are on the way out like it or not. It's a proven fact. When's the last time you seen a big block in a car? dont tell me the 6.2 or 6.4L is a big block either. Big v8's and small v8's are becoming a thing of the past. Cars will and are gettig smaller and so are the engines. It's already here. I'll put my yearly income in it. In less then 10 years ford won't have a v8 car.
The EPA regs are the only reason for this. The demand for V8s in performance cars has not slowed, only the conditions that permit them to stay in the mainstream.

The sports coupe buyer is increasingly concerned with fuel economy, but it is still far down the list of reasons to buy.
 

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