What rpm do you shift at when spirited driving with a manual transmission?-Poll

What rpm to you shift at when spirited driving with a manual transmission?


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KingKona

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One of the reasons I double clutch 99% of the time just old man driving around town.
There's absolutely 0 reason to double clutch. That's for trans without synchros.

 

K4fxd

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On the street rarely over 3000, on the track I shift at 7400
 

KingKona

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There isn't a specific RPM that gets shifted at. I don't drive staring at the tach. I use the acceleration and RPMs I need, at any given time. That varies with each and every singe driving situation.

Traffic and other considerations are what dictate what RPMs I shift at.
 


PC_GUARD

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There's absolutely 0 reason to double clutch. That's for trans without synchros.
It shifts smoother, it gives longevity, and allows head room when you do beat on it. It's general good practice whether synchroed or not, especially the way slow low rpm shifts are in this mt82. It is very smooth/low effort, but to avoid the jerky clunky sort of thing while nursing it (around 1800 ish) double clutch solves it.


Especially on a heel toe down shift, theres nothing wrong with giving everything the chance to spin at the same rate, without making the syncrhos work as hard.
 

KingKona

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It shifts smoother, it gives longevity, and allows head room when you do beat on it. It's general good practice whether synchroed or not, especially the way slow low rpm shifts are in this mt82. It is very smooth/low effort, but to avoid the jerky clunky sort of thing while nursing it (around 1800 ish) double clutch solves it.


Especially on a heel toe down shift, theres nothing wrong with giving everything the chance to spin at the same rate, without making the syncrhos work as hard.
It's completely un-necessary. You're actually working the clutch x2 as hard as necessary, including all the hydraulics and sundry mechanical parts.

There is no jerky/clunky shifting, ever, unless you don't do your part correctly. The clutch pedal isn't an on/off switch, it's a progressive, subtle, sophisticated tool.
 

PC_GUARD

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It's completely un-necessary. You're actually working the clutch x2 as hard as necessary, including all the hydraulics and sundry mechanical parts.

There is no jerky/clunky shifting, ever, unless you don't do your part correctly. The clutch pedal isn't an on/off switch, it's a progressive, subtle, sophisticated tool.
I think you're misunderstanding my point. Worrying about the hydraulics getting worn faster seems like a bit of a misnomer, considering no one would worry about using their brake pedal too much in fear of wearing out the hydraulics.


A synchro works like a brake, to match spin in the transmission, it is a WEARABLE part. I bought my car used with 57k on the clock, I have no idea how it was treated, how it was broken in etc. My part (and as you would do with an high performance car on a track) you baby whenever possible, so it doesnt break on you when you are beating on it. By double clutching at slow speeds you are lowering the work done by the synchros.

Is it necessary? Probably not a NEEDED technique, but it is a technique that will add longevity to wearable parts.
 

Balr14

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A synchro works like a brake, to match spin in the transmission, it is a WEARABLE part. I bought my car used with 57k on the clock, I have no idea how it was treated, how it was broken in etc. My part (and as you would do with an high performance car on a track) you baby whenever possible, so it doesnt break on you when you are beating on it. By double clutching at slow speeds you are lowering the work done by the synchros.

Is it necessary? Probably not a NEEDED technique, but it is a technique that will add longevity to wearable parts.
Unless you are beating the crap out of your car, the clutch disc is most likely to go long before the synchros. Double clutching increases clutch wear.
 

Dai Uy Ted

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There isn't a specific RPM that gets shifted at. I don't drive staring at the tach. I use the acceleration and RPMs I need, at any given time. That varies with each and every singe driving situation.

Traffic and other considerations are what dictate what RPMs I shift at.
Agree.
The rest of you, don't snort your coffee out your noses, but:
I learned to drive in 1961, on VW Beetles. Their only instrument was the speedometer. No tach (not even a gas gauge). Shifted by sound and feel. When acceleration eased, it was time to shift. Watched the passenger out of the corner of my eye when shifting - if their head jerked, I was being too sloppy.
Some sixty years later, after 90% of my driving being with manual transmissions, I still pay no attention to the tach. Haven't blown an engine or tranny yet, and am competitive of the line.
 

Jason304

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7500 - 8000. I have the shift light set at 8000, but I’ve gone past that and hit the rev limiter a few times in first gear doing 0-60 pulls.
 

Albertcado

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7-8k going on highway on ramps, 5k max on streets, there isn't enough room to be able to go above that.
 

raptor17GT

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Sometimes if the road is clear I just leave it in 5th (mt82-17) and bend swing it. Loads of torque from the coyote to haul it quickly from apex to apex if road is clear and swooping with no sharp corners. Otherwise it's 6500-7000 as it's out of breath after all
 

 
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