What are some common pain points on cars that see track duty?

mustang5o

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Odd. I would have guessed that it loosened from vibration, but that can't be the cast with the wire in place. First time I've heard of such a thing with this plug.
The way the wire in the this case looked it was just used to keep from losing the dust cap if it came off. To keep the actual Ronin plug in wouldn't you want to wire two sides and run the wires towards the front of the pan somewhere to try and keep pressure to push the plug into the pan. Am I thinking about this wrong?

I’m curious also, but the way I choose to look at it now is: If the car shoots a ronin plug out on track again and it fry’s the motor, then I’m buying a new motor. If it’s a factory plug, fords buying me a new motor. For this reason alone, I’ll stay with the factory plug.
Yeah, I've been concerned about the Ronin on my PP2 so I bought an extra factory plug to take to the track with me. I think I'm done for this year but when I put the winter storage oil in it I think I might switch it back to a factory plug. Is the Ronin tough to take out?
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Strokerswild

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The way the wire in the this case looked it was just used to keep from losing the dust cap if it came off. To keep the actual Ronin plug in wouldn't you want to wire two sides and run the wires towards the front of the pan somewhere to try and keep pressure to push the plug into the pan. Am I thinking about this wrong?
Correct, it appears to have been intended to retain the dust cap only.

Still, I've never heard of one of these blowing out. Crazy Voodoo vibration, perhaps.....
 

ChipG

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I had the same problem while on a track day. A close inspection of the composite oil pan found that the plastic tabs on the inside of the pain were completely missing. I could feel where the plastic was a bit rough in the areas where they were supposed to be located. Only conclusion is that the pan was originally defective as it would not be possible to over tighten a drain plug (plastic or metal) - due to the outside tabs preventing. Note that the outside tabs were intact - so nothing to alert to the problem with the inside tabs.

As a safety check, I would recommend at each oil change to check that the inside tabs are intact. Then, after installing the drain plug, try and pull the plug straight out of the pan. In my case, we found that the plastic plug could be pulled straight out with moderate effort. This was clearly due to the inside tabs not being in place as they serve to secure the plug in the pan. The outside tabs only serve to prevent over tightening.

I spoke to another GT350 owner who reported that his dealer installed a brass drain insert into his composite plan that better secures the plug. Was not able to find a tsb related to this but clearly there should be an inspection bulletin of some sort.
Were you using the stock plug, Ronin, or other?
 

pilotgore

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I had the same problem while on a track day. A close inspection of the composite oil pan found that the plastic tabs on the inside of the pain were completely missing. I could feel where the plastic was a bit rough in the areas where they were supposed to be located. Only conclusion is that the pan was originally defective as it would not be possible to over tighten a drain plug (plastic or metal) - due to the outside tabs preventing. Note that the outside tabs were intact - so nothing to alert to the problem with the inside tabs.

As a safety check, I would recommend at each oil change to check that the inside tabs are intact. Then, after installing the drain plug, try and pull the plug straight out of the pan. In my case, we found that the plastic plug could be pulled straight out with moderate effort. This was clearly due to the inside tabs not being in place as they serve to secure the plug in the pan. The outside tabs only serve to prevent over tightening.

I spoke to another GT350 owner who reported that his dealer installed a brass drain insert into his composite plan that better secures the plug. Was not able to find a tsb related to this but clearly there should be an inspection bulletin of some sort.
Did they happen to replace your pan under warranty?
 

pilotgore

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Correct, it appears to have been intended to retain the dust cap only.

Still, I've never heard of one of these blowing out. Crazy Voodoo vibration, perhaps.....
Correct, dust cap retainer only.
 

pilotgore

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Took some convincing, but yes, they will be replacing under warranty.
Any tips for me? I go in on the 4’th for replacement.
 

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Interesting. . . Just curious, do you use an impact to remove the lugs? I’ve probably pulled rims +/- 100 times in the 18 months I’ve had the car, and I haven’t had an issue with the lugs yet. I use a breaker bar to break them free, then an impact on the lowest setting to run them the rest of the way off. Same thing in reverse except them I use a torque wrench instead of the breaker bar.

I know tons of other members have had the same issue, so im just curious what method of removal everyone is using.
Breaker bar to break them free followed by a speed handle to spin them off, speed handle to put them on followed by torque wrench with 50 LB increments 50-100-150. Never had problem with stock lug nuts.
 

Trackaholic

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I’m pretty slow, so my car has been holding up well. Biggest issue on track is rear brake wear. Specifically the inside pad. I would keep checking the outside pad, only to find I had worn the inner pad down to the backing plate. replaced all four brake rotors. Fronts are pretty easy but the rears are a pain because you need to pry off the parking brake cable in order to unbolt the caliper so you can pull the rotor.

Therefore, be sure to keep an eye on those inner rear pads!

-T
 

ChipG

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I’m pretty slow, so my car has been holding up well. Biggest issue on track is rear brake wear. Specifically the inside pad. I would keep checking the outside pad, only to find I had worn the inner pad down to the backing plate. replaced all four brake rotors. Fronts are pretty easy but the rears are a pain because you need to pry off the parking brake cable in order to unbolt the caliper so you can pull the rotor.

Therefore, be sure to keep an eye on those inner rear pads!

-T
What drive mode are you using on track? Rear brake pad wear sounds like a lot of stability control utilization.
 

pilotgore

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What drive mode are you using on track? Rear brake pad wear sounds like a lot of stability control utilization.
That’s a very good point. My rears last at least twice as long as my fronts.
 

jmn444

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I’m pretty slow, so my car has been holding up well. Biggest issue on track is rear brake wear. Specifically the inside pad. I would keep checking the outside pad, only to find I had worn the inner pad down to the backing plate. replaced all four brake rotors. Fronts are pretty easy but the rears are a pain because you need to pry off the parking brake cable in order to unbolt the caliper so you can pull the rotor.

Therefore, be sure to keep an eye on those inner rear pads!

-T
def is good practice to remove wheels and inspect pads before/after track days too.... inspect wheels and rotors for cracking as well.

rotors are too expensive!
 

The Chairman

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That’s a very good point. My rears last at least twice as long as my fronts.
I’ve never replaced my rears. Not even 1/3 gone yet. Replaced the front twice so far. Pumping of the rear brakes is done by the ABS Controller as part of the Stability Control System. If you are sliding around a lot, the system will use the rear brakes to keep the car under control.
 

Hack

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What was the evidence or clue that the axle nut was loose?
I've had an axle nut come loose. The car got darty because the wheel was no longer held rigidly to the car. The axle nut is what clamps the rear hub into position against the rear upright. I jacked up the car and I could wiggle the tire - it had some slop in it.

I check them when swapping wheels occasionally since it's a known issue.
If the nut turns at all when you check it, then that nut will come loose later. The nuts are one time use. The nut that I had come loose - it did it because I re-used a nut rather than replacing with new. I thought using loctite and torquing properly would make the nut stay in position, but it didn't.

I would recommend checking by trying to wiggle the wheel when the car is jacked up rather than touching that nut.
 
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