V8 Engine Cylinder Deactivation?

Allerick

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Do you guys think there is any chance that the V8 will have an option to cut off half the cylinders in "eco" mode to save fuel (similar to the new Corvette and other sports cars)? I lean no just because I do not feel like the Mustang is in the right price range for that feature, but I do not know much about those systems or how expensive they are. Thoughts?

 

Thed

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Possible, but I think that the F-150 would get that "feature" first, since fuel savings are more critical for a fleet of trucks than a handful of V8 pony cars.
 

Wildcat

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I'm sure one of the insiders could give us some info, but I agree that it doesn't seem likely, at least not at this point. Maybe in the future?
 

FordBlueHeart

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You won't see it from Ford I believe. This is just my opinion, but why would Ford want to look like they are copying GM and Chrysler for what has been mostly a marketing hype?
 

aardvark

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You won't see it from Ford I believe. This is just my opinion, but why would Ford want to look like they are copying GM and Chrysler for what has been mostly a marketing hype?
I disagree. Cylinder deactivation is a way of improving MPG. And like all manufacturers, Ford is going to have use every trick in the book to meet upcoming CAFE standards.

I don't expect it immediately, but I do expect it eventually. And, as others have suggested, when it comes, it'll probably turn up in the pickup trucks first.
 


likeaboss

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As long as you can turn the feature off I'm ok with it.
 

FordBlueHeart

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It's been around for over a decade by GM and Chrysler, yet the corresponding vehicles get within a mile per gallon or two at most from non-MDS equipped vehicles. Pure hype at this point, even a decade later. Will it get better? I think so, but Ford will take a different approach.
 

Deroxas2.0

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You won't see it from Ford I believe. This is just my opinion, but why would Ford want to look like they are copying GM and Chrysler for what has been mostly a marketing hype?
It's not copying. You still need to engineer it for your own engines. Besides, it's not just GM and Chrysler using this technology now. Other manufacturers like Mercedes and VW also use it.
 

Chewy

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The Camaro has it, however it is only the on the L99 engine (V8 with automatic transmission) So if you are a stick driver its nothing to worry about. I'm also fairly certain it only deactivates cylinders when you are at a steady cruise above a certain speed , i.e. highway driving.
 

FordBlueHeart

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I disagree. Cylinder deactivation is a way of improving MPG. And like all manufacturers, Ford is going to have use every trick in the book to meet upcoming CAFE standards.

I don't expect it immediately, but I do expect it eventually. And, as others have suggested, when it comes, it'll probably turn up in the pickup trucks first.
Yes, it's a "trick". Just not a very good one yet.
As long as you can turn the feature off I'm ok with it.
Not off from the showroom floor. Think emissions.
It's not copying. You still need to engineer it for your own engines. Besides, it's not just GM and Chrysler using this technology now. Other manufacturers like Mercedes and VW also use it.
I didn't know this. Also haven't read anything about it. But maybe that's because neither of those brands have anything I would be interested in.
The Camaro has it, however it is only the on the L99 engine (V8 with automatic transmission) So if you are a stick driver its nothing to worry about. I'm also fairly certain it only deactivates cylinders when you are at a steady cruise above a certain speed , i.e. highway driving.
I forgot that it's an "automatic only" option.
 

nametoshowothers

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The Camaro has it, however it is only the on the L99 engine (V8 with automatic transmission) So if you are a stick driver its nothing to worry about. I'm also fairly certain it only deactivates cylinders when you are at a steady cruise above a certain speed , i.e. highway driving.
i thought it was just normal lack of performance in a chevy :)
 

Stevefreestyle

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The Camaro has it, however it is only the on the L99 engine (V8 with automatic transmission) So if you are a stick driver its nothing to worry about. I'm also fairly certain it only deactivates cylinders when you are at a steady cruise above a certain speed , i.e. highway driving.
Correct - only deactivates "excess" cylinders when light cruising or when stuck in slow trafic or idling at trafic lights. An overide would be good though.
 

DHG1078

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I think it would be a great feature to have IF the gas savings could pay for the extra cost. As far as I see it, the technology only has positive points other than cost right now. This is of course assuming they could get significant gas savings from it. Wouldn't it be cool to have a 450+ hp car and get 30 mpg highway from the factory with full interior and without disrupting performance? But as of right now I doubt it will help much since ford gets comparable, if not better, mpg as the other manufacturers without it.
 

 
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