used engine oil + winter storage why is it a bad idea ?

RPDBlueMoon

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Manual also says to change your brand new oil before fire up too for extended storage. So basically - Fall change the oil. Let that brand new oil sit all winter. Then change that Brand new oil in the spring with brand new oil. Sounds legit.

More legit:
"to summarize, oil does not "spoil", and non-use certainly doesn't sever the long chain molecules. Yes, moisture that accumulates from combustion by-products should be vaporized off once in a while, but oil is not hygroscopic, and extended storage will not add bad things"

And that moisture will collect at the bottom of the oil pan.

So how is particulates sitting in a oil pan any different than those same particulates circulating throughout the engine. All of it passes through the filter before going to vital engine components.

Also with modern synthetics, the risk of oxidation or acidity in super minimal at worst. Just wanted to see who still subscribe to the 1970's era.
Wait I'm confused, lol so are you suggesting to get an oil change before winter? That contradicts the oil change. Nice mustang btw





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NoVaGT

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Burned off when it shuts down? That air that was pumped in when when the engine was shut down at operating temp has some how "burned off the moisture" in the crankcase. How and where does it go on shut down?
PCV/exhaust.

There won't be enough moisture in the engine to hurt anything.
 
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WildHorse

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It will collect in the oil and start creating acid
Water in the oil will go straight to the bottom and not interact with the oil.
t's not that it attracts it, it's that moisture collects inside the block after the block cools.
Only if you run it then shut it off after a short time. Even so, how much water could that possibly produce ? 1/2 a teaspoon at best.
 
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WildHorse

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Wait I'm confused, lol so are you suggesting to get an oil change before winter? That contradicts the oil change. Nice mustang btw
No. I'm leaving the old oil in and changing it in the spring. I'm also NOT starting the car all winter. I have heat and a dehumidifier in the garage. Just to keep the overall humidity down. Winters hear tend to be much more humid than summer.

Also thanks, I like it haha.
 

Arknsawchuck

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Personally I'd be more worried about the fuel during extended storage than the oil. The corn in today's fuels does attract moisture, what did they call it...hydrophilic?. Anyway the ethonal attracts moisture and you could end up with a nice puddle of liquid corn flakes in your tank. Fortnine has a good you tube vid on this and fuel additives that are suppose to combat this.
 

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My car will have about 1200 miles or so on the current oil change when I park it in the next 3-4 weeks. I'm not changing it to park it and I'm not changing it when I pull it out in March when I typically would either. I simply don't believe it's needed.

I had a Camaro SS I did this exact same thing with for 6 consecutive years and no issues. I'm sure the Mustang will fare equally well.
 

NoVaGT

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Personally I'd be more worried about the fuel during extended storage than the oil. The corn in today's fuels does attract moisture, what did they call it...hydrophilic?. Anyway the ethonal attracts moisture and you could end up with a nice puddle of liquid corn flakes in your tank. Fortnine has a good you tube vid on this and fuel additives that are suppose to combat this.
Hygroscopic.

It's hygroscopic.

Pretty sure........
 

Warpath

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Water in the oil will go straight to the bottom and not interact with the oil.

Only if you run it then shut it off after a short time. Even so, how much water could that possibly produce ? 1/2 a teaspoon at best.
I don't think enough to do anything to worry about.
 
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WildHorse

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Personally I'd be more worried about the fuel during extended storage than the oil. The corn in today's fuels does attract moisture, what did they call it...hydrophilic?. Anyway the ethonal attracts moisture and you could end up with a nice puddle of liquid corn flakes in your tank. Fortnine has a good you tube vid on this and fuel additives that are suppose to combat this.
Most pump is 10% ethanol. Again, far to low of a concentration to be concerned. That, coupled with a plastic tank should yield zero issues. Remember too, while gas can go bad, ethanol will not.
 

Arknsawchuck

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Most pump is 10% ethanol. Again, far to low of a concentration to be concerned. That, coupled with a plastic tank should yield zero issues. Remember too, while gas can go bad, ethanol will not.
Ethanol may not go bad but it does pull in moisture out of the air and turn into wet corn flakes after a period of time. The attached pic is from my boat after sitting up for the winter. That is what ethanol looks like is my fuel filter bowl after sitting and soaking up moisture all winter. And that is 10%. This happens every winter.

20171118_072648.jpg
 

RIBS

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because there is a good chance your used engine oil to have metal particles which mean that they collect on the bottom of your oil pan then when you run your engine again this oil with the particles run through your whole engine. To be fair I did 1 track day with my new oil before having car in winter storage but still the oil is like few days from new new. I did that last year as well. Probably drived the car every 2 weeks or so for like 30 minutes as the weather was not that bad.

From the manual:

  • Change the engine oil and filter prior to storage because used engine oil contains contaminates which may cause engine damage.
The problem with the owners manuals are that the Lawyers got ahold of it. MAY cause engine damage. The word MAY basically means MAY OR MAY NOT, and nothing else written here in this sentence means anything.

personally I would put clean in it to remove old combustion by products and then just run it in the spring....
 
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WildHorse

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Arknsawchuck

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Sure, but, does ur boat run a closed fuel system like a Mustang ? You use stable ?
Yes it does. And that is with the marine sta bil. Our cars probably aren't as bad but I'm sure it happens at some level. And I'd bet E85 would be even worse. I know the gas in any gas engine I've ever had does not do well with long periods of storage.
 

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