Unique all-wheel-drive hybrid V8 powertrain revealed in Ford patent

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Allentown

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You and me both, I would love to have an AWD mustang.
Imagine if you had that and you had the Lexus rear end true tq vectoring rear diff....





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sdiver68

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In case Ford is doing sentiment analysis, Im posting my approval of this concept! Honestly, torque vectoring and AWD are almost required to keep pushing the performance envelope.
 

ttime500

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If the GT500 got an AWD system it could easily be a less than 3-second car considering things like the new M5 and it’s power.
This definitely should’ve been showcased on the 500. The 500 would be a mid 2 sec 0-60 car! They said no to the 500R maybe use this for a 500KR?!
 

FreedomPenguin

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Do you think manuals are a thing of the past or will they be an option with these new hybrid systems? Ive never seen a hybrid car with manual myself. Not sure how it works/mates to transmission.
 

EcoVert

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Do you think manuals are a thing of the past or will they be an option with these new hybrid systems? Ive never seen a hybrid car with manual myself. Not sure how it works/mates to transmission.
Hybrid or all electric manual transmissions are dead.
 

michail71

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Do you think manuals are a thing of the past or will they be an option with these new hybrid systems? Ive never seen a hybrid car with manual myself. Not sure how it works/mates to transmission.
Mostly they are a thing of the past. I doubt cars could be as efficient in energy management with a manual option. Even in overseas markets where there are many manual trans skilled drivers the benefits of auto are winning over. I miss driving a stick myself but I let logic win out and went with an auto this time.

The 2020 GT500 reveal with the electronic gear selector and electronic parking brake make me think the manual will be discontinued in 2021. The MT is still very popular for this car but Ford may be tired of them breaking too.
 

w3rkn

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I suspect, the engine bay needs to be redesigned somewhat, because the engine placement is different. Hence, new model.
 

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If there was an AWD Mustang, I’d surely be interested.

There’s quite a few AWD platforms outside of Ford that are very performance oriented and are still exhilarating from an Enthusiast perspective.

If Ford does it right, it will surely be a good selling product - more so for regions that experience All Season weather.
 

Stonehauler

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You and me both, I would love to have an AWD mustang.
only if it was biased correctly. Ford's AWD bias is currently towards the front wheels. This makes for a poor handling vehicle as seen in the Taurus SHO. I would much rather have a RWD bias with the front wheels only having power put to them during wheel slippage.

I don't know how this particular version will handle. With a normal AWD system where it's properly biased towards the rear wheels (such as BMW's system), you step on the gas and power goes to the rear wheels or put towards the front if slippage is detected. With this system, when you step on the go pedal, the front motors produce gobs of torque going to the front wheels from the motors while the rear gets the engine only. This seems ready made for really bad torque steer. I wonder how good it will be in practice. Maybe I'm completely off base and this will work perfectly, but something just doesn't seem right with this setup.
 

ttime500

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only if it was biased correctly. Ford's AWD bias is currently towards the front wheels. This makes for a poor handling vehicle as seen in the Taurus SHO. I would much rather have a RWD bias with the front wheels only having power put to them during wheel slippage.

I don't know how this particular version will handle. With a normal AWD system where it's properly biased towards the rear wheels (such as BMW's system), you step on the gas and power goes to the rear wheels or put towards the front if slippage is detected. With this system, when you step on the go pedal, the front motors produce gobs of torque going to the front wheels from the motors while the rear gets the engine only. This seems ready made for really bad torque steer. I wonder how good it will be in practice. Maybe I'm completely off base and this will work perfectly, but something just doesn't seem right with this setup.
I totally agree, however those AWD systems have been based on FWD platforms which usually ends up with that kind of bias. A mustang should absolutely be setup with a rear bias.
 

65Terdlingua

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After looking at the diagram I can see what you are saying about it being mounted to the oil pan... (crazy idea if you ask me) But you are forgetting that you would likely need an entirely new sub-frame and front spindles and possibly even chassis changes in order to clear the half shafts. A better idea would have been to either package them with the front spindles and eliminate the half shafts entirely or to mount them directly to the sub-frame.
Its not feasible to mount the motor to the hub directly. The required motor size would be too large and that mass would increase the unsprung weight way too much, meaning handling would be very compromised.
 

zackmd1

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Its not feasible to mount the motor to the hub directly. The required motor size would be too large and that mass would increase the unsprung weight way too much, meaning handling would be very compromised.
Hub motors have been achieved before. You are not looking for a massive 300kw motor per wheel. A simple small 50kw motor per wheel with a large diameter would be more then sufficent (the larger the diameter of the electric motor the more torque put simply) for an AWD system. Couple those with carbon fiber wheels and lighter weight spindles/brakes and unsprung weight would likely remain the same or even decrease.
 

65Terdlingua

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Hub motors have been achieved before. You are not looking for a massive 300kw motor per wheel. A simple small 50kw motor per wheel with a large diameter would be more then sufficent (the larger the diameter of the electric motor the more torque put simply) for an AWD system. Couple those with carbon fiber wheels and lighter weight spindles/brakes and unsprung weight would likely remain the same or even decrease.
How much room do you think there is on the knuckle? An inboard motor with a shaft is much more feasible for a mustang and what its intended to do. That is all performance killing weight on the wheel..
 

Roger Blose

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There goes the Mustang affordability attraction. Added complexity, weight gain, and new higher price. Who is this car being designed for?
 

zackmd1

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A brushless outboard motor design could be incoperated/combined with the brake assembly to create a single rotor system. An inboard motor assembly would still require platform modifications to accept half shafts and motor mounting. If the motors were incoperated into the brake assembly, little to no platform modifications would be needed and the system would be lighter then a motor and halft shaft driveline overall (not in relation to unsprung weight). I think you are overestimating how large and heavy an outboard brushless motor would have to be in order to be used in an AWD configuration. Motors around the 20lb mark can provide decent power and depending on diameter, large amounts of torque. Lighten up the brakes/knuckle/wheel and unsprung weight would not take a hit.
 

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