Should i twin turbo a GT mustang or buy a GT350

Biggus Dickus

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
Threads
55
Messages
1,499
Reaction score
1,375
Location
San Bernardino County
First Name
G
Vehicle(s)
Focus RS, Mustang GT, MME GTPE
How fast do you need to go?

 

DougS550

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 18, 2020
Threads
152
Messages
2,350
Reaction score
1,117
Location
Indiana
First Name
Doug
Vehicle(s)
2019 Ford Mustang GT Premium
The main reason I didn't buy a 350-500, I knew I wanted to mod in everyway possible and build the engine to my specs. For me, buying a cookie cutter 350-500 knowing it is not unique to me was a deciding factor. Now if I wanted to buy one to sell some day and make money, absolutely I would have bought one. I don't collect coins, antiques, collector stuff, that's just not me. Have fun
 

Nickel

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2019
Threads
43
Messages
350
Reaction score
251
Location
NC Twisties
Website
www.instagram.com
First Name
Nick
Vehicle(s)
2016 Ford Mustang GT PP
If I did decide to buy a GT and twin turbo it, what would I have to do to the car to make it capable of handling 650 to 750 hp. I know I would have to get better shocks, breaks, and tires, but I'm not sure what else I would have to do.
I realize this is going to sound condescending but it is what it is.

Why did you buy a V6 if you have the money to spend $50k-$80k on something faster? And with your lack of knowledge on how to set up a car properly, are you prepared that it is going to cost a crap ton of cash to go either route? The GT350 is a big responsibility if you want to hold onto that Voodoo, maintenance items are drastically higher than your V6. And going a GT TT route, you will spend less money overall if you buy a PP instead of trying to add the supporting mods at the same time.
 

bluebeastsrt

Oh boy
Joined
May 10, 2015
Threads
79
Messages
7,552
Reaction score
7,012
Location
New Jersey
First Name
BigD
Vehicle(s)
Ruby red 2019 GT Premium.
I agree this is the internet, one can make claims and not have to prove anything. There is a reason, I agree with that as well. It most likely is what makes more money, might have nothing to do with most effective form of power adder. The thread is asking about putting twins on a GT, well there is no TT on coyotes from the factory so the OP should not consider them because well there is a reason they don't come that way; along with any BMR stuff, slicks, or much of the other go fast stuff. I guess the answer is the GT350.
I’d be willing to bet it has everything to do with who gives the manufacture the best deal on there products. And absolutely nothing to do with one being better than the other. (Turbo, centri, screw, etc.)
 

Grintch

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2014
Threads
15
Messages
1,888
Reaction score
785
Location
Hunstville
Vehicle(s)
2015 GT PP
I’d be willing to bet it has everything to do with who gives the manufacture the best deal on there products. And absolutely nothing to do with one being better than the other. (Turbo, centri, screw, etc.)
I am betting it is packaging and reliability. Have a big V8? Superchargers package better, and the potential power advantage of turbos doesn't matter much. I don't think anyone has put in the work to get centrifical superchargers to meet OEM reliability standards. For example, having separate oiling systems for the supercharger (common with centrificals) I imagine would be a deal breaker for OEMs. But pricing you know is definitely a factor as well.
 


ALLSTOCK

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 15, 2018
Threads
26
Messages
441
Reaction score
339
Location
DMV
Vehicle(s)
2012 Honda Accord LX 5MT, 2019 Mustang GT Premium PP2
stock 350 all day homie. no brainer.
 

Balr14

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2019
Threads
16
Messages
1,842
Reaction score
1,554
Location
SE Wisconsin
First Name
John
Vehicle(s)
2018 Mustang GT convertible
Centrifugal superchargers were OEM on a several cars in the 50s and early 60s. They held up quite well, too. I owned two such cars, a 57 312 Ford and 61 Studebaker Golden Hawk. They didn't generate a ton of power, but it was enough to get your attention. I wish I still had that Ford. Those things are worth a lot now.
 

nnnnnn

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2017
Threads
4
Messages
105
Reaction score
52
Location
C-A
Vehicle(s)
Mustang GT Premium
The main reason I didn't buy a 350-500, I knew I wanted to mod in everyway possible and build the engine to my specs. For me, buying a cookie cutter 350-500 knowing it is not unique to me was a deciding factor. Now if I wanted to buy one to sell some day and make money, absolutely I would have bought one. I don't collect coins, antiques, collector stuff, that's just not me. Have fun
This sums it up.
Also the truth is that most people may advise you that the gt350 is a collector's car but the truth is most of those folks also go and trade their gt350s for the latest and greatest that recently got released. Buy a GT, add a blower, mod it the way you want and drive it. Don't park it in a garage, drive it. Seriously. When you get bored of it and want the latest and greatest, you'll know you enjoyed it before you parted ways. Also if you mod it right the way you want, you're more likely to keep it than trade it in the next year which is what most people do anyway. My GT is paid off since some years ago and I do whatever I want with it.
 

Grintch

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2014
Threads
15
Messages
1,888
Reaction score
785
Location
Hunstville
Vehicle(s)
2015 GT PP
Centrifugal superchargers were OEM on a several cars in the 50s and early 60s. They held up quite well, too. I owned two such cars, a 57 312 Ford and 61 Studebaker Golden Hawk. They didn't generate a ton of power, but it was enough to get your attention. I wish I still had that Ford. Those things are worth a lot now.
I meant modern OEM reliability standards.
 

 
119 - HP Tuners - 1
Top