Roush stage 2 or Whipple Gen 2

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MrDuckBootz

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Also I’m going to need more rubber but like the look of the pp1 wheels what’s the widest tire you think I could safely get a way with. Also I heard some one mention coilovers, any suggests on which?





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WhinRR

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Also I’m going to need more rubber but like the look of the pp1 wheels what’s the widest tire you think I could safely get a way with. Also I heard some one mention coilovers, any suggests on which?
I have the 19x10 PP1 replicas from American muscle for my street wheels and they fit without any problems with 305/35/19.
 

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I’m curious as to why some of you are saying to not supercharge it for track use because of heat. When we bring the Ford GT on the track (05) it’s supercharged and does well. Although they are completely different caliber of car I would assume same logic would apply
I don’t think anyone is saying a supercharged car can’t make a good track car. Well maybe one guy was. But the roush kit is known to have more problems with heat soak. Than other aftermarket kits or stock supercharged options like the GT500 ,Corvette Zo6, or Camaro ZL1. All of those cars have fantastic reputations as track monsters.
 

WhinRR

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I’m curious as to why some of you are saying to not supercharge it for track use because of heat. When we bring the Ford GT on the track (05) it’s supercharged and does well. Although they are completely different caliber of car I would assume same logic would apply
The more you pulley down the more heat you will generate so would have to compensate. You have to look at what you want as an end goal. If you are doing fastest lap type of events that includes long cool downs—you can be less concerned with heat. Most road race cars that competitively race are NA. NA’s power is more linear and produce less heat. But with FI a 6-7k gets you an extra 250 hp.
A lot of newer high powered cars go the FI route because it allows them to produce good gas mileage while catching consumers eyes with big power numbers. Their track performance shows FI can make a good track car.
I would try to get behind wheel of different cars and see what feels right to you
 
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The only reason I wanted the roush is the warranty but if it starts on the first in service date not when the supercharger is on the car I might as well go for the whipple I hear better things about that kit.
 

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The only reason I wanted the roush is the warranty but if it starts on the first in service date not when the supercharger is on the car I might as well go for the whipple I hear better things about that kit.
yeah go whipple if you goes FI. Also, go over to the road course and track section and look for posts from Flyhalf. He ran a entire track season on an Mustang A10 and also has a ZLE, which is obviously FI, so he's a good resource for what it will take to turn your car into track machine. Just a heads up the A10 is not as strong as the Camaro version of the A10 so heavy track use could be a problem down the road. I think he replaced his like 3 times, lol.
 

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I'd go with a whipple, because of it's larger intercooler. I'd also get a larger pulley (lower boost PSI) for roadrace use. I'm saying this to get a good balance of power and engine longevity. A stage II comes with a 3.875 pulley at 11psi. The stage I has 4.0 pulley at 10psi. The alternate pulleys are, 4.125 at 9psi, 4.250 at 8psi. Even with the largest pulley, you should have some nice power gains to drive out of the corners and gain speed in the straight sections.
 

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The main reason that GT can live on the track SC is it was designed that way.. You can throw some parts on your car that can make it faster then say a new GT500, but its going to take almost as much money to make it faster and as reliable doing it lap after lap after lap after lap..... Those cars are designed for that extra heat, engines built for that extra demand. I personally would suggest a centri SC if you are going to road race, you dont have that ton of torque down low and seems to be just a little easier on the engine, also a good GOOD intercooler can help keep IAT's down but youll still need to properly address cooling and the diff.


As far as learning to drive stick. I know plenty at Willow Springs that can keep up with pro drivers and cant heel toe for shit. but can run circles around others with a DCT/Auto. Its a great skill to learn, but you dont HAVE to know how to drive stick to be a fast driver.
 

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So I’ll give some personal experience here from one i ran a gen3 Whipple on my 17 gt.

I sold the car before making any hits on e85 but on 91 and 110 i made 725hp and 820hp with a 3.65and 3.5 pulley through the gen3. I also had full exhaust as well to help get me there but as you can see those numbers are pretty damn good.

instarted off with the Whipple tune for about a year or so before i switched over to PBD to get more power out of it. In either form the car drive great when just cruising and was a compete monster when i got on it. With both tunes i was able to get around 26-28 mph on the highway and 18-20 in town without an issue.

I installed the larger heat exchanger as well due to the weather being so hot here in Utah and by doing so the IATs were maybe 30° higher than ambient. The inlet on the Whipple is also A LOT larger than the roush which will allow for more power and airflow.

Between the 2 i would go with the Whipple based off of power, reliability, power, drivability, etc. and i assure you that you wabt be disappointed.

As for tires i ran 19x11 in the rear with a 325 Mickey Thompson SS on the rear and it would plant the power down in second gear (first is always a waste on the street)

If you want to go over any kits or ask any questions let us know and we can get you sorted.

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At the end of the day, supercharging and road course driving can get tricky because of all of the heat that positive displacement superchargers make when being pushed. The Ford GT has been built with optimal cooling components for track use. The whole car is configured around that engine bay. That being said, you just need to opt for the best cooling. If supercharging is the route you wish to go, then consider the Whipple over the Roush. It's going to make more power when it's twisting up and it does a better job at dissipating heat. Shoot me a pm anytime. https://www.lethalperformance.com/s...rgers/whipple-superchargers/supercharger-kits
 

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If you want a supercharger and plan on doing some track time, sell it and get a GT500. You have a number of things working against you on supercharging that GT and that's the CR is too high on your engine and you don't have enough heat exchangers. Pretty much with either of those systems you're building a "one pull wonder". Not only that, you won't really have enough brakes to sustain a day long session at the speeds you'll be capable of.

I went through this same exercise myself and came to the conclusion that I should just stay NA on my PP1 and enjoy it for what it is.

I'd rather purchase a factory freak (GT500) than build a Frankenstein (GT modded to death).
 
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MrDuckBootz

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In light of all the insight I have found from you guys as a collective, I decided that I will keep the 5.0 as a daily and add the whipple. I’ll turn something else into a track monster.
 
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MrDuckBootz

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And what ever car I decide to go with as the track car will be manual
 

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