ice445

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Money. A pushrod engine is cheaper to produce. Half the cams, half the valves, half the chains,and of course all the machine work that goes into those extra parts. If they are using the 7.3 casting the development cost is already sunk.

The coyote as much as I love it is about tapped out. Getting from 412 to 480 was cheap. To go from 480 to 548 would cost many times more.

Ford is changing/changed CEOs. They haven’t been making money like they should have been and I expect big changes on the horizon. Dodge has been killing it with their very old design cars with big engines and lots of torque. I expect ford has taken notice.
The 3rd gen Coyote is the pinnacle of the mod motor architecture, its true that there's nowhere else for them to take it. A divergence of the 7.3 would be cheaper and easier, yes. All the boxes for WHY are checked, but I can't fathom HOW they can justify it. Even with tricks like cylinder deactivation, it's still going to be almost impossible to get close to the same gas mileage that the coyote does with all its trick cam profiles and efficiency. Sure, that won't matter for the owners, but it sure matters to a large company like Ford that would be running this as a volume, bread and butter engine in the F150 and the Mustang GT. Unless they're just wagering that their electric models will offset the CAFE average murder.





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Mikthehun1

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Twin Turbo

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Oh, I agree.......it could be a Mustang badged **** (insert whatever vehicle you like).

Having said that, the only vehicles Ford currently produce with a V8 are the Mustang (the proper one) and the F-Series. Would they really stick a Mustang badge on an F-Series truck? (don't answer that one!!).

So, what other vehicle could it go in other than those two?

All that being said, this still seems odd to me. It goes against the current trends of downsizing and electrification. Don't get me wrong, if the engine is light enough and powerful enough, I have no problem with it being put in an S650, Long live ICE V8s!!!!

But I'm skeptical.
 

Ace

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I think it's way too unclear for what cars exactly this engine is made. It would make sense to put this in a GT500 or Raptor as a supercharged version. Or go for a hybrid-V8 with this. I have my doubts that this engine is a replacement for the Coyote, especially since they want to sell the Mustang7 internationally.

Or they are just using this engine for a "duty" Mustang like a SUV or Pickup derivat that is NA only
 

Twin Turbo

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I think it's way too unclear for what cars exactly this engine is made. It would make sense to put this in a GT500 or Raptor as a supercharged version. Or go for a hybrid-V8 with this. I have my doubts that this engine is a replacement for the Coyote, especially since they want to sell the Mustang7 internationally.

Or they are just using this engine for a "duty" Mustang like a SUV or Pickup derivat that is NA only

My thoughts exactly. Pretty sure if.......IF this is going in S650 it'd be a specialty model. I'd still bet on the Coyote (Gen 4) being the main V8 option.

Or, yes, a new member of the Mustang "family" of vehicles might get it.
 
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Ebm

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No way would they produce this engine in large numbers. Keep dreaming if you think a 6.8L will find its way in a regular Mustang (GT) or F-150. This is a purpose built specialty engine for only specialty trim levels. Think Shelby Mustangs and Shelby/Raptor F-150s.

Ford wouldn't bring anything in to compete with its Ecoboost line of motors, especially a gas guzzling 6.8L. The V8 is very much still on its way out, but it is on its way out for our regular, run-of-the-mill cars, not specialty cars. Remember... CAFE is still a thing. Also remember they couldn't sell a 6.8L Mustang in Europe...
 

BlackandBlue

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The 3rd gen Coyote is the pinnacle of the mod motor architecture, its true that there's nowhere else for them to take it. A divergence of the 7.3 would be cheaper and easier, yes. All the boxes for WHY are checked, but I can't fathom HOW they can justify it. Even with tricks like cylinder deactivation, it's still going to be almost impossible to get close to the same gas mileage that the coyote does with all its trick cam profiles and efficiency. Sure, that won't matter for the owners, but it sure matters to a large company like Ford that would be running this as a volume, bread and butter engine in the F150 and the Mustang GT. Unless they're just wagering that their electric models will offset the CAFE average murder.
The Charger 392 gets 15/25. The Mustang Gt gets 16/25. The charger weighs more and has a 10-15?(old) engine. I think Ford can pull it off. That said I don’t see them completely replacing the coyote with it. Like the 7.3, the cost is sunk and continuing to build is cheap. Why not have 3 or even 4 engine packages for the Mustang?

Dodge has been successful producing a few base products and making 100 different packages and options for those cars. Ford has taken notice and at this point their situation monetarily is pretty dire.

A 6.8 should be pretty close to being on square. Stick a supercharger on those things and let them eat. I demand a high redline though. I would love to see at least 6800.
 

Fly2High

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I doubt you will get a high redline out of a pushrod engine. I love the gen 3 rev at 7500. Music to my ears.

I feel that if they do get all that hp out of a 6.8, it might also be done to make room for a more powerful Ecoboost 4. I could see with all the competition coming in the near future in the 4 cylinder segment that they will need a more powerful 4 to compete. Making a much more powerful V8 leaves more room to expand the I4 too.

Even with more power, I will miss the Coyote. Glad I have my '19 PP2 even more. Not even sure I need more power than I have. Would much more prefer a much lighter car that is 3" narrower. If they do that (which we already can surmise they won't based on the next shared platform), I would contemplate buying one. Otherwise, I will enjoy my PP2
 

shogun32

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The Mustang Explorer. A 4-door version just like the Panamera. The 6.8 will come in the Lariat trim. :)
 

stanger1

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This is interesting, but I do love my Coyote. 730 hp from a little 5.0.
The bigger Engine would kinda go against what Ford has been pushing, a smaller, more efficient Engine in their Engine line up.
That big of an Engine would make since in the F150, but the Mustang?
Any additionally weight in the front end would be looked at as a bad thing. Yes, if only 100 lb's, but still weight in the front.
And yes, adding the Super charger to the Coyote adds about the same weight, but look at the power increase!!.
Depending on what happens Government wise, there may not be much, or any Fossil Fuel motor development for the future anyway.
Glad I have my Coyote now and will be keeping it as long as possible.
 

Erik427

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The 3rd gen Coyote is the pinnacle of the mod motor architecture, its true that there's nowhere else for them to take it. A divergence of the 7.3 would be cheaper and easier, yes. All the boxes for WHY are checked, but I can't fathom HOW they can justify it. Even with tricks like cylinder deactivation, it's still going to be almost impossible to get close to the same gas mileage that the coyote does with all its trick cam profiles and efficiency. Sure, that won't matter for the owners, but it sure matters to a large company like Ford that would be running this as a volume, bread and butter engine in the F150 and the Mustang GT. Unless they're just wagering that their electric models will offset the CAFE average murder.
Check out the gas mileage the camaro gets.
 

Mikthehun1

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The Charger 392 gets 15/25. The Mustang Gt gets 16/25. The charger weighs more and has a 10-15?(old) engine. I think Ford can pull it off. That said I don’t see them completely replacing the coyote with it. Like the 7.3, the cost is sunk and continuing to build is cheap. Why not have 3 or even 4 engine packages for the Mustang?

Dodge has been successful producing a few base products and making 100 different packages and options for those cars. Ford has taken notice and at this point their situation monetarily is pretty dire.

A 6.8 should be pretty close to being on square. Stick a supercharger on those things and let them eat. I demand a high redline though. I would love to see at least 6800.
I get like 10/12 in my Charger...
 

Balr14

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Pushrod engines can rev quite high. It's largely a matter of how long is the stroke. Short stroke engines of any type can rev quite high. There were E and F gassers in the 60s running de-stroked Chevy small blocks revving over 9000 rpms. I think emission controls forced most manufacturers to switch to smaller bore, longer stroke engines in the 70s.

Lots of interesting theories in this thread. I'm going to guess not much changes with regard to engine configuration for the Mustangs available to the general public. Ford has been content to go with the Coyote design for a many years. I can't see them changing now.
 

bootlegger

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Just based on future emissions and fuel economy standards, it seems extremely unlikely this will go in a regular Mustang GT. I am betting on it being an engine option for some crossover "Mustang" and possibly something like the GT500.
 

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