martinjlm

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It makes more sense to keep the 4.22 bore and shorten the stroke for more rpms. Otherwise, I can't see a reason for two engines with nearly the same displacement. But, I'm one of those guys who used to hop up GMC 6 bangers when everyone else was doing SBCs, so don't listen to me!:lipssealed:
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It’s not unusual in the Medium Duty Truck segment, which is where the F250/350 reside. In fact, it is not unusual to have low power / high power variants of the same displacement in that segment. This is really common with diesels in this segment, but not uncommon with gas engines. GM, for example, had high and low power 6.0L gas and high and low power 6.6L diesel on the same trucks for years. Half liter displacement difference is no big deal for this market.





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Norm Peterson

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It makes more sense to keep the 4.22 bore and shorten the stroke for more rpms. Otherwise, I can't see a reason for two engines with nearly the same displacement. But, I'm one of those guys who used to hop up GMC 6 bangers when everyone else was doing SBCs, so don't listen to me!:lipssealed:
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I agree, as that'd be the more performance-oriented way to go. But I recognize that Ford is going to put a lot more emphasis on emissions, where a closer to 'square' configuration tends to hold the advantage. It's a surface to volume ratio and crevice volume above the top ring thing. The entire run of 4.6 and 5.0 modulars have been 'square', and the GT500 modulars were all significantly undersquare.


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Falc'man

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The part in bold is where the logic falls apart.
  1. It is NOT being developed for F150. It is being developed for F250
  2. Yes there is a plant that already spits out alloy block engines for F150 and Mustang. It’s not this one, though. It’s across town. (5.0L is built at Essex. 7.3L and 6.8L are built at Windsor)
  3. The line that it’s going on is fairly new, because it’s the same line that the recently introduced 7.3L OHV V8 (cast iron) is produced.
Basically, the 6.8L is a smaller displacement version of the 7.3L. It is produced in the same plant, on the same production equipment, using the same material. The F250/350 used to have 6.2L V8 base, 6.8L V10 uplevel. Last year Ford killed the 6.8L V10 and replaced it with the 7.3L V8. This year, Ford is killing the 6.2L V8, which is why Romeo plant is closing, and putting the replacement for it, the 6.8L V8, on the same line as the 7.3L V8.
Thank you for clarifying.
 

Norm Peterson

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It’s not unusual in the Medium Duty Truck segment, which is where the F250/350 reside. In fact, it is not unusual to have low power / high power variants of the same displacement in that segment.
That's what I would have more expected. Half a liter out of 6.5 (average) is less than 8%. Barely over than 7% at the 7L point.


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4sdvenom

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Hmmm.... Return of the Boss 429 maybe?
That's my guess too. It's the only early model Mustang they have not brought back in a tribute version in the newer model Mustang.
Maybe the truck gets the standard 6.8 and the BOSS 429 gets a small tweak in bore size and/or stroke to get the 14 +/- cubic inches needed to justify the BOSS "429" name. As previously mentioned.

Hopefully they give a decent bore spread to allow for adding additional bore size!

Ken
 
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Balr14

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It’s not unusual in the Medium Duty Truck segment, which is where the F250/350 reside. In fact, it is not unusual to have low power / high power variants of the same displacement in that segment. This is really common with diesels in this segment, but not uncommon with gas engines. GM, for example, had high and low power 6.0L gas and high and low power 6.6L diesel on the same trucks for years. Half liter displacement difference is no big deal for this market.
Thanks, I really appreciate your insights.
 

Elp_jc

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Hey guys, what are the bore and stroke dimensions of the Gen3 Coyote? Couldn't find them, since it's past 5L now, due to the elimination of iron sleeves. Only found the 4.9xxL figures. Thx.
 

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Hey guys, what are the bore and stroke dimensions of the Gen3 Coyote? Couldn't find them, since it's past 5L now, due to the elimination of iron sleeves. Only found the 4.9xxL figures. Thx.
Bore is 93.0 mm, stroke is the same at 92.7 mm.


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Elp_jc

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Bore is 93.0 mm, stroke is the same at 92.7 mm.
Thank you. So it went from undersquare (92.2 x 92.7) to oversquare (93.0 x 92.7), but barely in both cases. And from barely being 5.0L at 4,951cc, to solidly 5.0L at 5,038. Thanks again.
 

Norm Peterson

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And from barely being 5.0L at 4,951cc, to solidly 5.0L at 5,038. Thanks again.
What's funny is that in the Mustang's Trans-Am racing history, 5.0 liters was the maximum displacement allowed for the ponycar class. Meaning that pasting a 5.0 badge on the car really amounted to saying that your engine actually displaced somewhat less than 5000 cc. Could be 4951, could be 4942, proper mathematical rounding was irrelevant in this situation.

So today's "5.0" - as produced by Ford - would have been illegal. But I suspect any team manager worth his salt would have had the crankshaft throws offset-ground a few thousandths to reduce the stroke just enough to squeak in under the limit. The rules did eventually allow "derived from production".


Norm
 

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