zackmd1

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So is this like confirmed that it’s coming to the mustang because I find it hard to believe that. Unless it’s for a special edition mustang with limited numbers i just can’t see it happening because of emissions. I would definitely welcome it due to being a less complex motor (getting rid of tick/rattles hopefully) and more torque but even Chevy is going DOHC flat plane in the corvette though so I’m not sure why Ford would do it. Only thing I can think of is they actually see an issue with the 5.0/5.2 with things such as oil consumption, ticks, rattles and want to get away from that architecture. Then again if this 6.8 isn’t as stout as the 5.0 and able to handle the crazy things that have been done to them in the last decade it’s a no go for me.

Nothing is confirmed yet...


But again, you are thinking about it like this would be an old school big block.... There are ways to make a large displacement motor efficient and pass current emissions. (Atkinson cycle combustion, cylinder deactivation, hybrid transmission). Going back to a pushrod to reduce production costs might allow them to combine these technologies that might be to costly combined with a coyote.





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MustangorCamaro

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Don't believe it. No time to play around with a 6.8 now. They'd better figure out how they're going to sell cars by 2035 now that California has put the hammer down on ICE vehicles. ALL states will follow California rest assured. Only a matter of time. Shit is changing fast. Hell Ford may not be around by 2035.

For the younger crowd, 15 years probably "sounds" like forever. It's not and will go by quickly.

The most likely scenario is the Mach E will take over as the Mustang after phasing out all ICE versions.
 
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bluebeastsrt

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Been reading this thread. And the only possible reason I could come up with for Ford going to a Windsor is size. That would make more room for electric motors at the front wheels. I’m a doubting Thomas. So I expect to see a 275hp 5.0 in the next gen car. The S650 will likely be my last new Mustang so I hope the 6.8 is real though.:like:
 

engineermike

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It's not just about airflow but also mixing in the combustion chamber to produce a more complete burn.... There is a video out there somewhere with a Ford engineer explaining why the 7.3 is a pushrod and in their analysis, 2 larger valves were better at the bore size of the 7.3 then 4 smaller valves.
I think “turbulence” is the word you’re looking for. Keep in mind that when ford engineers talk about something being “better”, max wot power is a very small portion of the operating context.

Less valve area will always lead to more cylinder turbulence regardless of the engine size. Higher turbulence speeds up the burn rate and requires less spark advance, and is more efficient as a result. Higher burn rate is important when your spark plug can’t be located in the middle of the chamber. A 4v head allows for a centrally located spark plug so the burn rate doesn’t need as much help like it does in a wedge shaped chamber. Less valve area and smaller ports have been used to improve turbulence for decades. This is the concept that the BBC peanut port and horrible SBC TBI “high swirl” heads were born out of. It’s also why the coyote has CMCV. However, at WOT the CMCV opens and the 2v high turbulence head designs become overly restrictive.

One example that reinforces my point is that even though it’s a big bore engine, the LS7 gains 200 hp when converted from a single 2.2” intake valve to a pair of 1.7” valves. Perhaps not coincidentally, the 4v version has 55% more valve skirt area and makes 49% more power than the 2v version.
 

Elp_jc

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What makes you think a pushrod engine is a downgrade? In many ways it's an upgrade in terms of complexity.
So a Civic is an upgrade over a Bentley because it's less complex? Come on man. A DOHC engine is always going to be the better engine when cost is not a constraint. Pushrod engines are cheaper to build than DOHCs, and that's a fact. They have advantages, of course, like smaller in size with equal displacements (for better packaging). And at least before they were saddled with crap like VVT, cylinder deactivation, etc., more reliable. But not sure that's the case anymore.
 

martinjlm

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Sounds the same as "my brother knows a guy who's cousin said". After looking into it more it seems likely that it's just a reporting mistake by this paper and not what's actually happening.
I went back and looked at the press conference feed again. It is what Dias said, but I think it may have been a mis-statement. Let’s start with, all who think that Ford would make a Mustang product reveal statement at a Unifor contract settlement press conference raise your hand

We’ve been dissecting this statement by Dias and have fallen into two camps.

One camp acknowledges that Ford could produce a 6.8L OHV off of the 7.3L and that such an engine could likely package in the S550/S650. But why would they? It would be cast iron, like the 7.3L, so likely heavier than the 5.0. Mustang is already front heavy. This won’t help.

The other camp (led by yours truly) is of the opinion that the Dias misspoke and that what will actually happen is the Windsor (or was it Essex?) plant will build engines for Mustang (5.2SC) and the 6.8L for F150 Super Duty. Somehow it came out as the plant will build 6.8L for Mustang and F150 Super Duty.

The Romeo handbuild line has to be relocated when the Romeo plant closes and this is where we think it is going.
 

martinjlm

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To confirm that this wasn't a typo made by the Windsor Star, a member of affiliate site Bronco6g.com downloaded the Unifor press conference in which the union president clearly says they've negotiated to have a 6.8L engine built in Windsor. Comes at 01:57 of this press conference recording:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/w3iex143duqwyi3/Ford TA News Conference-2020.09.22.mp4?dl=0
This true. That is part of the reason for the press conference. The other thing that is true is Ford is closing the Romeo plant. Where the Predator is hand-built. That engine has to go somewhere. Likely that it is going to Windsor along with the 6.8L. This would be the “Mustang variant” that Dias was speaking of. The GT500. So soon the hand built Predator would come from Windsor instead of Romeo.
 

SilverSurfer98

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Buddy boy?! Those are some heavy words! Lol! Haha!
 

DougS550

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A "big block" Coyote would be epic.
I think the Windsor is a Short block and the Cleveland is between a Short block and big block, but most consider the C a Big Block. Won't have the same high reving, easily modified to increase HP by over 60% without going into the engine. Not for me.
 

Copperhead73

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I think the Windsor is a Short block and the Cleveland is between a Short block and big block, but most consider the C a Big Block. Won't have the same high reving, easily modified to increase HP by over 60% without going into the engine. Not for me.
What I really mean is a "bigger" coyote.
 

Mikthehun1

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What I really mean is a "bigger" coyote.
I'd rather have a Wile E. Coyote. Ecoboost the Coyote. It'll run like this:

Wile-E-Coyote-movie.jpg


Then, all we need is Dodge to bring back the Plymouth Roadrunner. Think about it, lightweight Giorgio platform with something spicy under the hood.
 

15ThreePoint7

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Just stumbled onto this thread, I think Ford could easily do a 6.8L pushrod motor with an aluminum block and heads. They can easily put it in the Mustang. A 6.8L with a boatload of torque can cruise at 1100
Rpm and 60mph while sipping gas.

If you look at the reasoning behind the 7.3L in the super duties, it's because they have more ability to pull while using less fuel. The late 80s and early 90s Mustangs were quick because they made a lot of torque. Everyone looks at that 225 hp but forget that 300 ft lbs of torque.

As long as the gearing is right, it's possible. It could be something they will put in the stang as a limited production vehicle. There were only a few hundred 2000 Cobra Rs made.
 

15ThreePoint7

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True, but the architecture is already there and the reactions to the 7.3 could have stoked a fire.
 

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