Interesting read in new GT500 Owner's Supplement

GrabberBlue

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Wow, thanks for posting this. Big change! I assume this recommendation is backwards compatible through all years?

Also, look right above that regarding the 5w50 oil ... says oil needs to meet WSS-M2C931-C OR API SN requirements. That opens up oils not on the current approved list and is BIG!
The owners supplement has always stated that 5w50 API certified equivalent oils are acceptable.

"Your engine has been designed to use engine oil that meets our specification or an equivalent engine oil of the recommended viscosity grade that displays the API Certification Mark for gasoline engines."

The way I read it is that the WSS-M2C931-C is still the recommended oil, if you absolutely are unable to use it then any 5w50 API SN certified oil will work. Like in an instance that you are down a quart in the middle of nowhere and it is your only option.
 
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Rainier42

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The owners supplement has always stated that 5w50 API certified equivalent oils are acceptable.

"Your engine has been designed to use engine oil that meets our specification or an equivalent engine oil of the recommended viscosity grade that displays the API Certification Mark for gasoline engines."

The way I read it is that the WSS-M2C931-C is still the recommended oil, if you absolutely are unable to use it then any 5w50 API SN certified oil will work. Like in an instance that you are down a quart in the middle of nowhere and it is your only option.
Not really, attached is screenshot from my 2019 Owner's Manual, which is VERY different than what is written in the 2020 Owner's Manual.

Screen Shot 2019-11-04 at Nov 4, 2019  2.57.09 PM.png
 

DBL-E

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Just make sure you swap out the Michelins:clap:
Yep..already looking at options to swap in the Spring when she comes out of hibernation. Tires were like hockey pucks when I took her around the block on Saturday and temps were in low 40s.
 

Caballus

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The owners supplement has always stated that 5w50 API certified equivalent oils are acceptable.

"Your engine has been designed to use engine oil that meets our specification or an equivalent engine oil of the recommended viscosity grade that displays the API Certification Mark for gasoline engines."

The way I read it is that the WSS-M2C931-C is still the recommended oil, if you absolutely are unable to use it then any 5w50 API SN certified oil will work. Like in an instance that you are down a quart in the middle of nowhere and it is your only option.
2016 said this--nothing about API:

Ford part number /Ford specification Ford part name or equivalent Capacity Item (with optionalexternal axle lubecooler) XO-5W50-QGTMotorcraft SAE 5W-50 Full Synthetic Motor Oil 10.0 quarts (9.5L)(with filter change) Engine oil 2WSS-M2C931-B

Edit: Oops. Footnote says API ok--you're right.
 
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Before everyone rushes out to buy 0w40, the next page in the 2020 Owner's Supplement has this to say about temperature:

upload_2019-11-4_14-8-13.png

Basically, you can use 0w40 when it's so cold the MPSC2's have to come off.
 

matthewr87

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If you use Motorcraft 5W50 then it shears down pretty quickly anyway so I wouldn't worry about it ;)
 

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Not really, attached is screenshot from my 2019 Owner's Manual, which is VERY different than what is written in the 2020 Owner's Manual.

Screen Shot 2019-11-04 at Nov 4, 2019  2.57.09 PM.png
You're right, there is an interesting new statement in the 2020 GT350 Supplement...that directly goes against people using any ol' 5w50 oil.

"Oil must meet specification WSS-M2C931-C or use SAE 5W-50 oil that meet API SN requirements."

The only reason the "or use SAE 5W-50 oil that meet API SN requirements" exists in there is because Ford cannot legally tell you what oil brand to use. So long as it is the correct viscosity and meets API SN requirements, you are protected under the Magnuson Moss Warranty Act.

So why would you use an oil that the engine was not specifically designed to use?
 
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You're right, there is an interesting new statement in the 2020 GT350 Supplement...that directly goes against people using any ol' 5w50 oil.

"Oil must meet specification WSS-M2C931-C or use SAE 5W-50 oil that meet API SN requirements."

The only reason the "or use SAE 5W-50 oil that meet API SN requirements" exists in there is because Ford cannot legally tell you what oil brand to use. So long as it is the correct viscosity and meets API SN requirements, you are protected under the Magnuson Moss Warranty Act.

So why would you use an oil that the engine was not specifically designed to use?
I wouldn't and I think your missing the point of this thread. Prior to 2020, the only oil Ford said to use were those that met their WSS-M2C931-C specification. With 2020 they are now saying oils to use are those that meet their 'C' specification or those that meet API SN requirements. As an example, prior to 2020 Ford would not recommend using say Mobil 1 5w50 since it does not meet their 'C' spec but since the M1 oil does meet API SN requirements, it is approved in 2020. Again, a big change.
 

GrabberBlue

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I wouldn't and I think your missing the point of this thread. Prior to 2020, the only oil Ford said to use were those that met their WSS-M2C931-C specification. With 2020 they are now saying oils to use are those that meet their 'C' specification or those that meet API SN requirements. As an example, prior to 2020 Ford would not recommend using say Mobil 1 5w50 since it does not meet their 'C' spec but since the M1 oil does meet API SN requirements, it is approved in 2020. Again, a big change.
2019 GT350 Supplement:

"Use Motorcraft SAE 5W-50 full synthetic or an equivalent SAE 5W-50 full synthetic oil meeting Ford specification WSS-M2C931-C."
Page 29

"Your engine has been designed to use engine oil that meets our specification or an equivalent engine oil of the recommended viscosity grade that displays the API Certification Mark(1) for gasoline engines."
Page 49

2020 GT350 Supplement:

"Use Motorcraft SAE 5W-50 full synthetic or an equivalent SAE 5W-50 full synthetic oil meeting Ford specification WSS-M2C931-C."
Page 29

"Your engine has been designed to use engine oil that meets our specification or an equivalent engine oil of the recommended viscosity grade that meets API SN requirements(1) for gasoline engines."
Page 52

"Oil must meet specification WSS-M2C931-C or use SAE 5W-50 oil that meet API SN requirements."(2)
Page 52

I have underlined and numbered the changes between the pre-2020 and 2020+ Supplement:

  1. A change from displaying the API Certification Mark to just meeting API SN Requirements. If I were a betting man, AMSOIL has something to do with this. A criticism of AMSOIL has always been that the 5w50 Signature Series meets WSS-M2C931-C but does not bear the API Certification Mark. That is no longer an issue with the 2020 Supplement verbiage change.
  2. The second change is Ford's way of playing with words to state WSS-M2C931-C oils must be used without getting in legal trouble by going against the Magnuson Moss Warranty Act. I see this statement being included to directly stop conversations like these in this thread, that Ford recommends use of other non-WSS-M2C931-C oils. It doesn't get much clearer than; oil must meet specification WSS-M2C931-C. The only reason "or use SAE 5W-50 oil that meet API SN requirements" is included is to ensure they don't get sued for failure to heed the Magnuson Moss Warranty Act.
 
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shogun32

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oil must meet specification WSS-M2C931-C. The only reason "or use SAE 5W-50 oil that meet API SN requirements"
is because 931-C is equivalent to API SN and they "forgot" to mention that in the previous edition. 931-B corresponds to API SM.
If Ford had any sense they would publish the details of the additive package. At least the broad specs are:
https://www.fcsdchemicalsandlubricants.com/main/additionalinfo/Product Data Sheet 5W50 Full Synthetic.pdf. I don't feel like paying $30 to read https://standards.globalspec.com/std/13067150/FORD WSS-M2C931-C to see what it brings to the discussion.
 

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is because 931-C is equivalent to API SN and they "forgot" to mention that in the previous edition. 931-B corresponds to API SM.
If Ford had any sense they would publish the details of the additive package. At least the broad specs are:
https://www.fcsdchemicalsandlubricants.com/main/additionalinfo/Product Data Sheet 5W50 Full Synthetic.pdf. I don't feel like paying $30 to read https://standards.globalspec.com/std/13067150/FORD WSS-M2C931-C to see what it brings to the discussion.
I spent the $30. It was worth it to me. There are differences between 931C and API SN in high temperature deposit formation and in phosphorus content. Phos is the biggie - API SN contains 25% more phosphorus than 931C, which is not good for your cats if you're consuming oil. For instance, I'll run API SN during the winter when the car goes for a drive every couple of weeks, but I want 931C when I'm using 2 quarts a month going to track days. I also bought 931D, which is the API SN Plus version of 931 for FI engines. It adds the extra LSPI tests for SN Plus and reduces or removes some of the other differences, although it's still a lower-phos formulation.
 

Hack

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I spent the $30. It was worth it to me. There are differences between 931C and API SN in high temperature deposit formation and in phosphorus content. Phos is the biggie - API SN contains 25% more phosphorus than 931C, which is not good for your cats if you're consuming oil. For instance, I'll run API SN during the winter when the car goes for a drive every couple of weeks, but I want 931C when I'm using 2 quarts a month going to track days. I also bought 931D, which is the API SN Plus version of 931 for FI engines. It adds the extra LSPI tests for SN Plus and reduces or removes some of the other differences, although it's still a lower-phos formulation.
Phosphorous is a good anti-wear ingredient in oil. I would rather have to replace catalytic converters in some distant future instead of having to replace the engine.
 

JAJ

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Phosphorous is a good anti-wear ingredient in oil. I would rather have to replace catalytic converters in some distant future instead of having to replace the engine.
I'm not sure that there's a discernible performance difference between the 931C/D low phos (800 ppm) formulation and the regular API SN high viscosity 1000 ppm formulation. API SN for lower viscosities up to xw30 limits phos at 800, so all Ford did was adopt the lower viscosity phos level for their 5w50 higher viscosity oil. Engines running xw20 and xw30 API SN oils aren't failing all over the place, so whatever formulators did to compensate for lower phos seems to have worked. I suspect it costs formulators money they don't need to spend to reduce the phos in xw40 and xw50 oils, so, with only a few exceptions, they haven't bothered.
 

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