How to get Whippled GT in the 10’s

Andy13186

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Thank you




7100-7200
go to 8k if your tune lets you . Ive hit 8400+ multiple times with no problems but that was on accident. I would definitely go 8k+ if I was manual. Mines a 2018 though Idk if that matters but these cars love rpms.
 
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Whitedevil95

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go to 8k if your tune lets you . Ive hit 8400+ multiple times with no problems but that was on accident. I would definitely go 8k+ if I was manual.
I agree with ^. have an auto but mine shifts at 7800-8000 each gear.
 

Howler5.O

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I know the Whipple continues to make power. I think I’m limited by the tune to 7400-7500 limiter. I’ve hit it once accidentally. Unless someone knows how to change this in the Whipple Tomahawk tool.
 
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WhinRR

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go to 8k if your tune lets you . Ive hit 8400+ multiple times with no problems but that was on accident. I would definitely go 8k+ if I was manual. Mines a 2018 though Idk if that matters but these cars love rpms.
I rather keep shifts around 7500. 8K+ is a lot for stock valve train and internals for me.
 

Andy13186

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I rather keep shifts around 7500. 8K+ is a lot for stock valve train and internals for me.
At least 7800, I think all aftermarket auto tunes on 2018's even NA shift at 7800 and manual benefit even more from RPM's than autos, and when boosted its a no brainer. Ive hit at least 7800+ rpm every day for like 600+ days straight no problems, multiple times a day paddle shifting my 10r80 car both when NA and when boosted at 770 rwhp. If you do this check your oil level often though like once every 2 weeks.
 
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WhinRR

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At least 7800, I think all aftermarket auto tunes on 2018's even NA shift at 7800 and manual benefit even more from RPM's than autos, and when boosted its a no brainer. Ive hit at least 7800+ rpm every day for like 600+ days straight no problems, multiple times a day paddle shifting my 10r80 car both when NA and when boosted at 770 rwhp. If you do this check your oil level often though like once every 2 weeks.
I disagree with N/A... unless you go to intake like cobra jet you lose after 7500. S/C make up for that difference dt increased belt speeds
 

Andy13186

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I disagree with N/A... unless you go to intake like cobra jet you lose after 7500. S/C make up for that difference dt increased belt speeds
Peak power NA on gen 3's is ~7000 rpm , manuals drop a ton of RPM on shifts and that makes high revs help a lot, autos are tuned to shift at 7800 but drop a lot less RPM on shifts. Easily beneficial for manuals to hit 7800+ rpm before shifting even when NA. Boosted peak power with most gen 3 coyote setups is like 8k+ and that makes it very beneficial to rev it out especially with a manual. Its all about the total power through your shifting powerband.

Basically if you make more power at 7800+ than whatever RPM you will end up at in the next gear at that 7800rpm gears speed, then its beneficial to rev atleast that high. You can calculate this from this calculator as long as you know your rear end ratio, tire height, and transmission gear ratios https://spicerparts.com/calculators/transmission-ratio-rpm-calculator . Then look at a dyno graph of your car and see if you make more power at 7800 than whatever RPM you will end up at in the next gear after you shift.
 
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Austin1992

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I havnt took mine to the track but have all the stuff you mentioned and still had a little bit of wheel hop. I changed out the rubber toe knuckle bushing to the ford performance derlin ones and adjustable toe links and it helped big time.
Waiting on those bearings in the mail but didn’t order toe links since I have a pp1. You think the stock links are sufficient or should I swap those too?
 
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WhinRR

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Peak power NA on gen 3's is ~7000 rpm , manuals drop a ton of RPM on shifts and that makes high revs help a lot, autos are tuned to shift at 7800 but drop a lot less RPM on shifts. Easily beneficial for manuals to hit 7800+ rpm before shifting even when NA. Boosted peak power with most gen 3 coyote setups is like 8k+ and that makes it very beneficial to rev it out especially with a manual. Its all about the total power through your shifting powerband.
This doesn't take into account torque which falls off way more at upper RPM than HP does with a N/A car. To each their own for sure and I felt more comfortable shifting at 7500 than 8000 with stock drivetrain-- even if I lose a tenth or two in the 1/4 mile
 
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