RocketPak

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https://www.roadandtrack.com/news/a34645336/mustangs-with-cup-2-tires-not-built-in-winter/

Ford Stops Building Sticky-Tire Mustangs Every Winter
The fastest Mustangs wear Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires, but that summer rubber can't get enough grip to leave the factory from November to March.

November 11, 2020

If you want a Ford Mustang with ultra-sticky Michelin Sport Cup 2 tires, you have a few trims to choose from. There's the GT with the Performance Package 2, the Mach 1 with the upgraded handling package, and the Shelby GT500 with the carbon fiber track package (as well as the discontinued Shelby GT350 and GT350R). All three come on Sport Cup 2s, ultra-aggressive tires designed to offer grip levels that were once only available with true racing slicks. Like racing tires, Cup 2s require some serious heat to work properly, and in cold weather, their rubber compound gets hard and slippery. That's a problem for Ford: those upgraded tires are so extreme, Ford can't build any Mustangs wearing Cup 2s during the winter months.

The Mustang assembly plant in Flat Rock, Michigan, does not put out any of the aforementioned Mustang trims during the months of November, December, January, and February. A report published by Ford Authority—and confirmed by Ford to Road & Track—says this is because the Cup 2 tires may lose traction during the certification dyno run at the end of the assembly line, which is performed on every single Mustang built. Additionally, each Mustang leaving the assembly line is loaded onto a freight train for transport, and apparently, the ramp onto the train is so steep, those Cup 2s simply can't get any grip during Michigan's coldest months. If you've ever driven on Cup 2s in cold weather, you'll understand how little grip there is to work with, and why Ford might take such a precaution.

In a statement provided to Road & Track, a Ford spokesperson explained the reasoning behind the production decision.

"The safety of our manufacturing & logistics colleagues is of the upmost importance so it is them that we keep in mind too for the decision not to build those Mustangs with that specific tire compound during the cold winter months here in Michigan."

Having Mustangs sliding around loading bays and off of dyno tracks probably isn't the safest working environment, so the move makes sense.

This little revelation means that the most desirable performance Mustangs are only built for eight months out of the year—and that, theoretically, if you were to order one of those Mustangs today, you'd have to wait until March 2021 for your car to be built. Ford told us this policy is why the Mach 1 handling package won't be available until next year.

Michigan winters are no joke, and those Cup 2s are very explicitly known as "summer-only" tires. This anecdote helps explain why. Are you expecting to take delivery of a new Mustang with Cup 2 tires soon? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.





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Zathras

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Aside from the tires, I'd like to know more about the "certification dyno" that the article refers to (it says every Mustang is dyno tested at the factory). I just wonder if they really run them at full power, do they let the engine warm up at all first, etc...
 

Biggus Dickus

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My PP2 was ordered 2/21, built 3/23, delivered 4/20
 

Rapid Red

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That is true, ordered a car NOV. delivered APL 15, best tax day yet, and forever ...

New car, Dyno full power pull .......... questionable .
 

Mikthehun1

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That is true, ordered a car NOV. delivered APL 15, best tax day yet, and forever ...

New car, Dyno full power pull .......... questionable .
They tested the Coyote with some seriously brutal methods. One of them was to run until the headers started to glow, shut the motor off, run ice water through the cooling jackets, then start it up to do it again...and again...and again.

http://www.mustangandfords.com/parts/m5lp-1003-2011-ford-mustang-gt-50-coyote-engine
 

Zooks527

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Aside from the tires, I'd like to know more about the "certification dyno" that the article refers to (it says every Mustang is dyno tested at the factory). I just wonder if they really run them at full power, do they let the engine warm up at all first, etc...
Per a Flat Rock worker over at the Blue Oval forums, It's not a full power pull. It's a run of the engine and transmission at a mid-range level and through the gears to make sure there's nothing grossly wrong. The engine isn't warmed up first and the dynamometer does not fully load the system.
 
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Rapid Red

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Per a Flat Rock worker over at the Blue Oval forums, It's not a full power pull. It's a run of the engine and transmission at a mid-range level and through the gears to make sure there's nothing grossly wrong. The engine isn't warmed up first and the dynamometer does not fully load the system.

That is the what I thought /understood to be happening.
 

BlackandBlue

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I don’t know the exact wording for the break in procedure but It basically says don’t go to fast. I believe it has more to do with making sure all the bolts are tight and nothing is going to fail at high speeds then it does breaking in the engine. If break in could be detrimental to the engine, Ford would take more precautions to make sure they didn’t get warranty claims. That doesn’t seem to be the case.

Performance cars also don’t sell very well in the winter so shutting down production doesn’t seem abnormal for any reason. Producing something just to deeply discount it is not a good business practice. Special Orders are a fraction of sales normally so they kinda get crapped on even in normal production.
 

lacanteen

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Per a Flat Rock worker over at the Blue Oval forums, It's not a full power pull. It's a run of the engine and transmission at a mid-range level and through the gears to make sure there's nothing grossly wrong. The engine isn't warmed up first and the dynamometer does not fully load the system.
Yes, that is correct. My father worked in a GM assembly plant in Final Process. They called this the "roll test" that tested the drive train, brakes, and suspension.
 

jwt

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Most modern engines are given a blast at wide open throttle after assembly, euphemistically called spanking the baby :)

Modern machining tolerances are so good that honestly a freshly built engine is just as "run in" or lapped as 70's engine was after 1000 miles
 

Vlad Soare

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If break in could be detrimental to the engine, Ford would take more precautions to make sure they didn’t get warranty claims. That doesn’t seem to be the case.
Unless they know that the damage will only be visible several years down the line. Or that it is very hard to be observed (e.g. 15 BHP less than spec). Or it can be dismissed as 'normal' (e.g. typewriter tick).
 

BlackandBlue

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Unless they know that the damage will only be visible several years down the line. Or that it is very hard to be observed (e.g. 15 BHP less than spec). Or it can be dismissed as 'normal' (e.g. typewriter tick).
Of course they would look to the accountants to make certain decisions but we have a history on these engines of 3-5 years depending on model. Nothing like that seems to be taking place in the longer term. Just think about what the average test drive of a sports car is like. If it caused damage we would know by now. That said I bought my car with 50 miles on it. I imagine those 50 miles were pretty hard. It runs great though.
 

Mikthehun1

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Of course they would look to the accountants to make certain decisions but we have a history on these engines of 3-5 years depending on model. Nothing like that seems to be taking place in the longer term. Just think about what the average test drive of a sports car is like. If it caused damage we would know by now. That said I bought my car with 50 miles on it. I imagine those 50 miles were pretty hard. It runs great though.
9 years, but yeah.
 

Elp_jc

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Ford makes 'sticky-tire' Mustangs all year... they just don't stick in winter :).
 

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