Ford Performance Tune for 2018+ GT

StangTime

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Yea mine rubs as well, there is a lot of headroom under there. I don't think there will be any issue with this. If you push up on the liner there is a lot of room. Also your overflow tank rubs on the liner as well along with the CAI. You can see a deep outline from the air box.
Thanks. I won't sweat it then.
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opengl

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No amount of pulling would have helped...

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The shortcut many of us have taken is just to yank and twist to snap off the plastic ear the bolt goes through. The assumption being, the sound tube is never going back in anyway.
 

cmxPPL219

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First, just want to say this thread already has a lot of great info from all the others who've done this, so for the folks reading my post about totackle this install, shout out to those who came before us. I spent hours reading every page, first to last, of this thread - I'll be just adding my thoughts and experience. Get ready for a long read:

Resources:
For those who may be confused with this kit and how to install it - as others have stated, Ford could have done a much better job making it clear what to do. This kit comprises of multiple components, but you need to look at instruction manuals for the Intake Install kit itself M-9603-M8B, AND the ProCal unit M-12655-F - the kit doesn't really make this clear.
Below are the FP websites for each. Download the PDF Instructions that are on the site for each item.
https://performanceparts.ford.com/part/M-9603-M8B
https://performanceparts.ford.com/part/M-12655-F

Note on ProCal Install:
I've seen some people confused about this part, so in case those didn't see previous posts by others, this is the deal with it:
Have the ProCal Instructions PDF Open, while reading this, AND when you get to the car.
1. Follow the ProCal Instructions to create/login to Ford Performance Account; Enter your voucher ID.
2. Download the ProCal software to PC.
3. Install ProCal software.
4. Open ProCal software.
5. Connect ProCal Unit.
6. Follow on-screen prompts (More than likely, at this point, it will ask you to update the ProCal's software automatically. Follow the prompts.)
7. When complete, disconnect ProCal and go to car to save the Stock Calibration.
8. Reconnect the ProCal to PC.
9. ProCal software on PC will detect you have a saved Stock Cal; it will then ask in a popup if you want to login to your FP account. YES, you do. What is happening now, is that it will upload the Stock Cal to FP servers. THIS IS NOT MADE CLEAR, and not stated anywhere in instructions, but by logging in, this starts to upload Stock Tune to FP Servers.
10. ProCal software will then automatically download FP Calibration. Follow the prompts.
11. Ultimately, if successful, you will see two Calibrations in the unit, displayed in the ProCal PC program, as mentioned in the official instructions.

(NOTE: if you get a popup saying error or something failed, during Stock Cal upload progress, and/or during FP Cal download, disconnect the ProCal, close the ProCal program on your PC. Reopen ProCal and reconnect ProCal device, and try to login to FP Account again, when prompted. This happened to me, and what I described worked.)


On to the Install
Finally got around to installing mine earlier today. Initially, I bought this thinking I'd let the dealer install it for warranty purposes, but my car was bought in Jan 2019, so there's really only a few months of 3/60k kms (3/36k miles) warranty left, plus I'm mechanically inclined, and wanted to make sure I took my time. Don't really trust the dealers around here, like others.
I took care of the ProCal software install onto my PC and save of the Stock Calibration onto the ProCal and upload to FP servers the day before, so all I had to do today was install the physical components, and when done, load the FP Calibration onto the car, prior to test drive.

++ Kit Arrives

Always a good day when parts arrive.
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++ Removal of OEM Components

1. Below: Removal of Sound Symposer:
What worked for me: 10mm ratcheting wrench:
Beaten to death by the internet and other threads on this forum, removal of this and the associated nut, is a real *itch. I decided to forego removal via accessing the provision within the wheel well, which requires removing the wheel and fender liner. I happen to be a glutton for punishment when it comes to things re: my cars, so I decided to remove the nut from the top.
First, if you are a guy or gal with bigger arms/forearms, forget the method of removing the symposer from the top. I'm not really what I'd call muscular, but that fit between the driver side valve cover and shock tower is real tight.
I have no idea how some used a socket and various swivels, none of mine worked lol. So I used a ratcheting wrench.
Problem with this, is that you BARELY room to swing the arc to engage a few clicks of the wrench, because the wrench will hit all the stuff down there as you try to swing the arc. I took my time, had to take my arm out twice to take a break to avoid cramping up. This took a while. Pack your patience. When all was said an done, got a slight bruise above my elbow, and various scratches (the type that don't bleed, thankfully). The satisfaction, though, when that damn nut is removed, is real.
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Below: Continuing to Remove OEM Components:
Once the sound symposer BS is done and out of the way, removal of OEM factory airbox and throttle body parts is straight-forward.

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++ Installation of FP Components:

Below: Install of 87mm Throttle Body to Intake Manifold:
Things continue to be fairly straight-forward here. Cleaned/wiped this mating surface and gasket before putting on the 87mm throttle body adapter.
Note: Make sure no debris falls into the intake manifold abyss, as some may. Just wipe the opening if some does.
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Below: Installing 87mm Throttle Body Adapter:
Don't over-tighten these bolts. They're going into a nylon intake manifold, and you run the risk of cracking the screw bosses in the manifold. If you don't have a torque wrench, it's fine - just tighten gradually in a star pattern, until you no longer feel the bolts compress the gasket. As you finish tightening, snug your fist up near the head of the wrench you're using, and just hand-tighten till you start to feel resistance, and that's it. Good tight, but don't muscle these bolts on.
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Below: 87mm Throttle Body installed:
The same principle as above, do not over-tighten these bolts. Same tips as above. Note the install orientation - The camera is level, horizontally - this is what the throttle body will end up looking like, slightly canted.
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Below: Brake Aspirator Tube Elbow:
For mine, I did not cut the hose ~1inch and trim the length, as the instructions say - I just took a small flat-head and worked my way around the hose and factory non-elbow, and slowly pried it and pulled it out.
I just then connected the uncut hose, to the new white elbow. It felt it better to have a bit more slack in the hose, to alleviate the pressure that this cheapish inlet tube nipple coming from the inlet pipe already has enough of, to avoid breakage like another member experienced.
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Below: 87mm Throttle Body Stack-Up / Alignment - Incompatibility with FP Air-Oil Separator:
As others have pointed out in this thread, the separator for the 18+ Coyote GTs will not fit. I've included my own pictures below, showing the issues with hoses and how it rubs the throttle body, and how the FP separator itself touches the harness.
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Below: OEM PCV Hose - Does not fit Either?
I'm not sure what others have done - I assume those who don't have another brand oil separator / catch can have put the oem part back on. However, I found that it was hitting the throttle body. I could have left it, but I didn't like the constant rubbing that would occur from engine vibrations over time.
Also, the damn PCV valve opening and intake spigot / connector always feel so damn fragile, so even if I left it on, it was putting pressure on those two parts, because the hose can't come to rest in it's nominal position. So I did something else, below.
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Below: Used UPR Catch Can Hose as PCV Hose - Temporary:
Before I got the FP Air-Oil separator, I had a UPR unit. (The FP one had not come out just yet). It came with these Continental ContiTech 10 hoses, that are flexible. So I used the longer one of the two, and used this as my new PCV hose, until I get a new catch can (probably from JLT or something, where they have the driver side unit with long hoses and mount more remotely near the shock tower; but, instead, I'll use it on the pass. side. I saw someone do this, so credit to them!)
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++ Install Finish - Final Notes, Observations, Issues

1. Throttle Body and Intake Inlet Hose Coupler Alignment:
As others have said, getting the throttle body inlet tube coupler to line up properly and be concentric with the throttle body itself, is a real bear. I could have made it line up with no gap near the top, but it seemed like it was putting way too much pressure on the entire intake manifold and throttle body as a unit. So, thinking about indefinite amounts of heat cycling, vibration, etc., over time, I didn't want to put too much artificial stress on the the whole assembly, so I left a slight gap at the top of the throttle body. I might take a look at this after the kit has been on a while, and rubber breaks in, etc. (Forgot to take a pic, but others in this thread so kindly have)

2. 87mm Throttle Body Stack-up View:
What it looks like, complete, with the adapter / spacer.
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3. Finishing up the FP Calibration Load:
This is the last screen view on the ProCal 4 Unit, after the FP Calibration is loaded. How it says "...95 of 95" - 95 is the same number you see when you are saving the Stock calibration to the ProCal. However, as someone else has said, it seems slightly quicker to load the FP Cal, than it was to save the Stock Cal. Maybe because the FP Cal is makes the car go faster, so it loads faster 😆 lol
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4. 87mm Throttle Body Gear Housing Clips - One went missing:
When I opened everything up after receiving the kit from FedEx, I noticed that one of the gold/bronze coloured clips was not secured 100% to the black nylon portion of the gear housing. I tried to press it in, but it would just not budge. I didn't want to hammer it in or use any force, as throttle bodies can be sensitive to shock, etc., so I left it, thinking that the gear housing will be held in by the remaining clips. Well, on the test drive, upon returning and opening the hood, saw it disappeared. Point is, factory let the part out this way, but luckily, doesn't seem to big of an issue at all. It's really solid, with no movement. (Note: You can actually see what I'm referring to in the last pic in this section, from when I took pics of the stack-up / alignment)
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4. Hood Fitment Post-Install:
Some have said they have slight issues with the hood closing on the driver side - I have this "issue," as well. However, it's not extreme, and you wouldn't know unless I pointed it out. These cars have horrendous body alignment issues from factory anyway, but prior to install, I was one of the lucky ones, and the hood-to-fender alignment was great.
If you look closely now, you can see it's slightly raised on the driver side, compared to pass. side, due to the slight tolerance differences in the open-air element housing.
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5. Brake Aspirator Elbow Rubbing on Hood Insulator
This is another "issue" pointed out by someone else here on this thread, and I also notice it with mine. Fairly minor, but will continue to monitor to see if it seems to be an issue. The damn "nipple" that the elbow connects to on the inlet pipe is already not the most robust and IIRC, Briebee had his crack, so going to keep an eye on this one.
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6. Before - After:
I elected to not put the engine cover back on. I'm the type to want to keep it on, but let's see, it is nice in ways to not have it, gives a clearer view to things, monitor for leaks, around gaskets, etc.
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7. Drive - IATs
It was 70*F out today, somewhat cool for August 1st, in Toronto. On the first drive on the highway after the install, IATs were about 73-74*F. Very good temps, lines up with what others have said.

However, as expected, IATs jump when sitting idle. Below is from sitting maybe 2 minutes, 70*F outside, as noted on the Sync3 screen. 100*F, which is 30*. Things do cool decently, though, as you drive off. Will be interesting to see how the heat soak is on really hot days. I think one thing to note, is that despite the hood seal, this is not the same as a closed box (like the factory unit) and also due to thinner plastic on the FP stuff, this will be expected for the open air element. The idea behind these kits is that it prioritizes track or performance driving, or at the least, constant movement on the street, so there's always a compromise.
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8. Drive - First Impressions:
While Installing, I had the battery unpluged for way over 30mins, so the KAM was likely reset, so take this into account when reading my impressions (car to relearn fuel trims, etc. that are now erased). I have 91 in the tank.
The "butt dyno" approves.
This is not a night and day difference kit. It's been hammered home by others, and I'll agree to that, and those wanting more need to look elsewhere. A kit like this is designed for certain folks who want the warranty, and seek something mild.
Now, with that said, as others have stated, in all drive modes, the car is more lively. In Track mode, especially, the car is hoot to drive, and 2 or 3rd gear pulls from 2,000RPM throw you back in the seat more than before.
++The car's induction sound is louder during acceleration on the street, and during a passing maneuver, on the highway.
++Also, very pleasantly (for me) is the slight crackling and popping on some upshifts at higher RPM, AND also at idle revving to higher RPMs. I have the OEM active and it's all stock, resonator is still on. (I plan to be putting on the Corsa Active later this summer) but, even before that, this was a real nice surprise.
++ Shifting feels better. Gate engagement seems smoother, less notchy. High RPM 1-2 shifts are smoother. My experience echos what someone else has said, and I have no idea how to qualify how - perhaps it's how the power is delivered now, which is smoother than before the FP Cal.

I didn't have much more time to drive, as I had to do other stuff, but first impressions of the kit, despite some of the minor issues, is that it was well worth-it for me. I like the overall improvements in throttle response, low-end torque and overall driveability, and like the FP part family. The car feels like it should have from factory.
When I can, we have access to 93 around us, so I'll try that, and drive the car more to see how it drives as time goes on, and the car relearns parameters.

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LetItRide1978

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Did anyone else’s kit not come with the 90 degree elbow for the brake aspirator tube or the crankcase ventilation tube (black tube with blue clips)? I purchased this kit on the day it became available and the instructions I received make no mention of these parts. However, I just checked the Ford Performance website and the updated instructions include them as well as the corresponding install steps. When I installed the kit, I just reconnected the stock parts. Should I contact Ford Performance and see if they will send me the missing parts? Below is a pic of how the install looks on my car.

9D7DED84-E797-43FB-8D21-E2E4B3585F25.jpeg
 

Dans18GT

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Yes, you can check with them. I bought early as well and they sent me the 90° fitting.
 

Dfeeds

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@cmxPPL219 regarding the bulge in the hood: when looking at the airbox from the front, check the tabs on the right side. There's, if I recall, three that interconnect. These can get stuck in the groove and cause the top piece of the airbox to bulge up. You should be able to get the hood to be flush without any adjustment
 

cmxPPL219

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@cmxPPL219 regarding the bulge in the hood: when looking at the airbox from the front, check the tabs on the right side. There's, if I recall, three that interconnect. These can get stuck in the groove and cause the top piece of the airbox to bulge up. You should be able to get the hood to be flush without any adjustment
Thanks for this tip! - let me go out and take a look later - I'll update.
 

cmxPPL219

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Did anyone else’s kit not come with the 90 degree elbow for the brake aspirator tube or the crankcase ventilation tube (black tube with blue clips)? I purchased this kit on the day it became available and the instructions I received make no mention of these parts. However, I just checked the Ford Performance website and the updated instructions include them as well as the corresponding install steps. When I installed the kit, I just reconnected the stock parts. Should I contact Ford Performance and see if they will send me the missing parts? Below is a pic of how the install looks on my car.

9D7DED84-E797-43FB-8D21-E2E4B3585F25.jpeg
Yeah, others on the thread have mentioned it, but if you have an early release kit, Ford botched the release of this, and people had missing parts.
Like Dans18GT said, contact Ford Performance, they appear to be good at sending people missing parts.
 

cmxPPL219

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@cmxPPL219 regarding the bulge in the hood: when looking at the airbox from the front, check the tabs on the right side. There's, if I recall, three that interconnect. These can get stuck in the groove and cause the top piece of the airbox to bulge up. You should be able to get the hood to be flush without any adjustment
Took a look earlier, and all the tabs were definitely in-place properly, so I guess it's just a tolerance thing. I did notice that the rubber seal did not make strong markings on the hood insulator, so perhaps over time as it does, the misalignment will get ever so slightly smaller.
 

RKRZ

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++Also, very pleasantly (for me) is the slight crackling and popping on some upshifts at higher RPM, AND also at idle revving to higher RPMs. I have the OEM active and it's all stock, resonator is still on. (I plan to be putting on the Corsa Active later this summer) but, even before that, this was a real nice surprise.
Great post and photos, would have been useful for me a few months back.

Also, for your exhaust solution, I'd recommend you stay with the factory active exhaust but do a resonator delete into an H-Pipe. Cheap option (H-Pipe is $200-300 CAD), keeps the perfectly fine oem valve functionality, gives the car the aftermarket sound you're after, and you still get the overrun crackling / burbles until warm up and those upshift bangs.

I'd say this video is a pretty good representation of tone, but videos obviously reduce volume perception:
 

Dans18GT

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I agree with just replacing the resonator and keeping the factory active exhaust.

Here is my car with an x-pipe after the Ford Performance tune in track mode.
 

LetItRide1978

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I have the Borla S Type Active with black tips and really enjoy it. Couldn’t stand the unfinished tips of the factory active exhaust. Looking back however, I wish I would have just went with the FP x-pipe and seeing how I liked the sound first before getting the Borla.
 

SnakeMaster16

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I have the Borla S Type Active with black tips and really enjoy it. Couldn’t stand the unfinished tips of the factory active exhaust. Looking back however, I wish I would have just went with the FP x-pipe and seeing how I liked the sound first before getting the Borla.
I too want to change the tips and still retain the active functionality, so I was looking at the Borla system. Can you post a sound clip? I have a roush x-pipe with the stock avtive mufflers currently.
 

LetItRide1978

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I too want to change the tips and still retain the active functionality, so I was looking at the Borla system. Can you post a sound clip? I have a roush x-pipe with the stock avtive mufflers currently.
I don’t have any recording equipment so I doubt it would be accurate. I found that Borla’s video on YouTube comparing their active exhaust options for the Mustang is pretty decent.

Some things I have noticed compared to stock are: cold starts are quieter, quiet mode is louder, overall tone is a little deeper, nice muscle car rumble in lower rpms and gradually gets raspier in the higher rpms. I only had the stock exhaust for 600 miles or so. I doesn’t seem much louder, if at all, from stock but it does have a nicer tone.
 

cmxPPL219

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Great post and photos, would have been useful for me a few months back.

Also, for your exhaust solution, I'd recommend you stay with the factory active exhaust but do a resonator delete into an H-Pipe. Cheap option (H-Pipe is $200-300 CAD), keeps the perfectly fine oem valve functionality, gives the car the aftermarket sound you're after, and you still get the overrun crackling / burbles until warm up and those upshift bangs.

I'd say this video is a pretty good representation of tone, but videos obviously reduce volume perception:
Thanks - I only got the ended up getting the kit last week, and decided to do a mega post to help folks out with some of the things I encountered.

It's funny you mention this option, it's something that I wanted to do exactly, for the very reasons you outlined, but then somehow went off into wanting a full catback.
However, since bringing this up, I'm gonna strongly consider back to this route, because frankly, it also saves quite a bit of cost too.
 
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