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Extracting oil through dipstick tube

Garfy

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I'm wondering if anyone has tried to extract the engine oil through the dipstick tube? The top part of the plastic tube seems large enough but due to the sharp bend right at the beginning, I'm wondering if either a silicone or polyethylene hose (1/8" or so?) would work. I only need to draw out a few ounces in order to have my oil analysis done later this year when it's due for it's annual oil change (after 4 months I'm at 74% oil life so I know the year will be over before it reaches anywhere near 10% or less). Since it's a new car for its first oil change I thought I'd get an oil analysis done later this year. Thanks!
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FreePenguin

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Why not use the pour in spot ?
 

BMAGOO

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Or just drain the oil, get your sample and pour it back in but I would just get the sample when you do your annual oil change.
 

HiTekExec

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I'm curious why you'd even bother with an analysis on a new car that hasn't had it's first oil change?

After 4 months on original oil, I'd change it and put your favorite flavor of oil and filter in anyway.
 

Elp_jc

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Unless you have a brand new oil extractor, and clean it well before using it, the oil would get contaminated, so forget about that option. The good news is with the plastic plug on our cars, it's super easy to just pour a little bit of oil, and then lock the plug back in place. You shouldn't spill even a drop... but you have to put the car on ramps; that's all. Good luck.
 

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Rapid Red

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Heard of that never would, 10 QTS of oil thru a straw think about it?
 

Biggus Dickus

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This thread reminds of the old schoolyard joke about a girl who could suck a golf ball through a garden hose.
 

Vlad Soare

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Actually, as strange and laughable as this idea may look at first glance, there are (or were) devices made precisely for this very purpose - sucking the oil through the dipstick hole. Back in the 1990's every major gas station around here used to have such a machine and to offer an oil change service for a modest fee. It was quick and clean. The only drawback was that you didn't change the oil filter, but that was OK, because in those days the filter did not necessarily have to be changed each and every time (the recommended maintenance schedule was something like: change oil every 5000 km and the filter every 15,000 km, or something along those lines, it memory serves).
I haven't been giving this too much thought since then, but now I realize it's been quite some time since I last saw one. I don't know when the idea died out; probably sometime in the early to mid 2000s.
 
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offroadkarter

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I haven't done this on the mustang but I do this all the time on my M5 and 330. I got this for the M5 because it has an aluminum oil pan with a steel drain plug so with that being said, I prefer not to touch it. On top of that, in the BMW's the filters are accessed from the top, so I have zero reason to lift the car.

If you want to do this for an oil sample you will want to use a clean extractor of course.

DSC_9869-X4.jpg
 

Rapid Red

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Actually, as strange and laughable as this idea may look at first glance, there are (or were) devices made precisely for this very purpose - sucking the oil through the dipstick hole. Back in the 1990's every major gas station around here used to have such a machine and to offer an oil change service for a modest fee. It was quick and clean. The only drawback was that you didn't change the oil filter, but that was OK, because in those days the filter did not necessarily have to be changed each and every time (the recommended maintenance schedule was something like: change oil every 5000 km and the filter every 15,000 km, or something along those lines, it memory serves).
I haven't been giving this too much thought since then, but now I realize it's been quite some time since I last saw one. I don't know when the idea died out; probably sometime in the early to mid 2000s.
I know and is why I made a joke about it. Consider the placement of the dip stick tube & the drain plug. And ask, of the 2 which will remove the most oil?

Gas stations in the US stopped maintenance, & changing oil 70's .
 
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Garfy

Garfy

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I'm curious why you'd even bother with an analysis on a new car that hasn't had it's first oil change?

After 4 months on original oil, I'd change it and put your favorite flavor of oil and filter in anyway.
Thanks to everyone who replied (even the "joker"). Seriously, I'm not doing the analysis now with only 1,000 miles on it; I'm planning on doing it at the 1 year point when it's due for the oil change (which is being done by the dealer as they included 3 oil changes when I purchased the car). Since I've never dealt with the plastic drain plug before, I just thought it was like regular drain plugs where it's almost impossible to drain just a little at a time, so I guess I'll do that before I take the car in. I do have ramps so I'll try that.

BTW, since the drain plug is plastic, how often do you guys replace the drain plug? On conventional steel drain plugs in aluminum pans I usually just replace the crush washer in order to ensure that I won't strip the pan threads. But with this plastic drain plug, I wonder at what point would or should you replace it to avoid failure? That was my only concern with the engine; plastic drain plug in a composite oil pan.
 

Vlad Soare

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BTW, since the drain plug is plastic, how often do you guys replace the drain plug? On conventional steel drain plugs in aluminum pans I usually just replace the crush washer in order to ensure that I won't strip the pan threads. But with this plastic drain plug, I wonder at what point would or should you replace it to avoid failure? That was my only concern with the engine; plastic drain plug in a composite oil pan.
As far as I know Ford recommends replacing it every time it's removed. In practice you'll probably be fine reusing it a couple of times.
 

Elp_jc

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My main concern with the plastic drain plug is the O-ring. I don't know what is made of. If somebody finds quality replacement O-rings made of Butyl or better, please post a link :). In the mean time, I'm replacing the plug every time. For the first oil change, I thought I bought an OEM plug, but it was not (stupid eBay; always misleading). It was a 'Dorman', which is there now. I guess those are fine for just one OCI. I bought an OEM for the Shelbys with a square hole, rather than a 'handle', so will use that one next. They're more expensive, so hopefully of better quality. I might use that one twice. And will keep looking for O-rings, which are the equivalent of a crush washer IMO.
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