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Biggsy

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Clearly this hobby tool is not large enough or strong enough.
61EAadWd-0L._AC_SL1000_.jpg


And I wonder if this will do the job, maybe better than standard angle grinder because this will have a narrow blade and thus not remove as much material.
2417205_newmas.jpg
I’m sure Eric will chime in but it actually is strong enough. I used it to cut the holes for my Aerocatch latches. Keep in mind that was a smaller job size wise. Blade/wheel is key but I kept having to recharge mine. RL template is two rectangles so it’s possible to use it.

I watched a YT video of a mustang owner use the Milwaukee version of the saw to install his Trackspec vents. Both will work
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Well you didn't answer my question. Trying again:
Did you use one of their hobby units, or one of their saws?
Surely the hobby unit is not powerful enough for the job.

I wonder if one of their saws would have a narrower blade than a regular angle grinder, which should speed up the process.
Kind of a rude response, don't you think?
Clearly this hobby tool is not large enough or strong enough.
61EAadWd-0L._AC_SL1000_.jpg
This is what I used. So clearly it is sufficient. Don't over think it.

Does this answer your question now? Try being more polite next time.
 
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tosha

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Clearly this hobby tool is not large enough or strong enough.
61EAadWd-0L._AC_SL1000_.jpg


And I wonder if this will do the job, maybe better than standard angle grinder because this will have a narrow blade and thus not remove as much material.
2417205_newmas.jpg
Stock hoods are aluminum, they are very easy to cut compared to other materials. This saw would definitely work better than rotary tool, but it's not a must have

I used this one with a half-round blade to make adjustments and it cuts through just fine. https://www.milwaukeetool.ca/Products/2836-20.


Why do you care how much material is removed? You're cutting an open hole and racelouvers have 1 inch overlap to cover the cut edges.
 

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Kind of a rude response, don't you think?

This is what I used. So clearly it is sufficient. Don't over think it.

Does this answer your question now? Try being more polite next time.
You said " I just used one of their standard corded units. Nothing fancy. "
Both Dremels for which I posted photos (per Biggsy's request) are corded. Yes, most people think of the small hobby tool whenever they hear the word "Dremel". I've used variations of their hobby tool for over 50 years, and it seems underpowered and too small to cut all the linear inches for a hood vent mod. Furthermore, the small cutoff wheel can't even be held perpendicular to the hood.

So that's why I posted my question - to clarify if you used that or something stronger. As for being rude, I was simply pointing out that your answer still left me wondering precisely which tool you used.
 

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Stock hoods are aluminum, they are very easy to cut compared to other materials. This saw would definitely work better than rotary tool, but it's not a must have

I used this one with a half-round blade to make adjustments and it cuts through just fine. https://www.milwaukeetool.ca/Products/2836-20.


Why do you care how much material is removed? You're cutting an open hole and racelouvers have 1 inch overlap to cover the cut edges.
Interesting that that tool can be used on sheet metal. Obviously I'm learning about this stuff on an as-needed basis.

As for removing material, a narrower blade would make less debris and require less power to run. I'm also concerned about blade bind and grab or kickback.

Again, I've never done this, and I have a big beautiful orange fury hood like Eric's!

20210811_082215.jpg
 

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Interesting that that tool can be used on sheet metal.
With a circular blade for metal, you certainly can. Don't try to cut all the way through on the first pass. it's not lumber, don't force the saw through it, but instead gradually work your way through the cut over multiple passes. That applies to any tool that you will use. You won't have any issues with kickback if you don't force it. Aluminum is super soft metal for cutting.

Amount of shavings will be considerable regardless of the blade thickness imo. That's just how aluminum sheet metal reacts.

Keep in mind that you will need to cut the underside, not just top layer. I had to remove extra cutout for underside so that the screws fit well. Attaching couple pics to give an idea (don't mind the rain trays). Be careful not to cut through the top layer while doing this.

20230613_163445.jpg

20230613_163439.jpg

20230613_163432.jpg
 
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Eric, progress report on your oil cooler?
Do you run a diff cooler?

Sorry if I was rude. I think I'm direct. Others might say I'm rude, lol.
No hard feelings feelings, Philip. I was having an annoying day at work and was cracked out on espresso...weird combo.

I do not run a diff cooler. Only titanium heat wrap on the exhaust pipes and BG 75-90 diff fluid. Highest diff temp I've ever seen is 250°.

As for engine oil cooler, I'm being very undecisive. I have the money for one socked away and have all the pieces picked out to run a Setrab 948 and Autometer gage but it's a lot of money and I also really want coilovers.
Everyone on TMO says Setrab 948 is the golden standard but a lot of those guys run higher horsepower, actual 20 min races, and race in 100° weather. I'm stock power, really only drive in time attack style (few hot laps and then cool down lap), and I don't even go to the track if it's going to be 90° outside so I don't think I need Setrab 948 level cooling. Which brings me back to the Mishi kit that everyone says is ineffective. It's a lot cheaper and I really like that it comes as a complete kit. The shape of the cooler, the 10AN lines, and the one 180° fitting has me a little concerned about oil pressure drop but the few people I know who have had the Mishi kit said it worked fine, just not as significant of temp reduction as DIY Setrab kits.

Long story short, I'm likely just going to duct my radiator this summer and see if that's enough cooling for my driving style and then put the money toward coilovers. If it's not enough cooling, I'll either go Mishi kit or get a really big radiator and leave the oiling system unmolested.
 

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Glad we're cool. I felt my comment was a simple statement of fact, but perhaps I could have chosen softer wording. Anyway...

Please discuss with me your oil cooler plan. I think mine (DIY) is the best of them all. It has solved my CHT problem and up to 30min. CHT runs 228F steady, and this is before I put in a RL hood vent (next). See "Track Time limited..." thread, page 30, post #443.

My opinion is that ducting is a lot of work and still won't get your CHT under control. Put in the oil cooler first.

I finally reached diff limit temp at the 30min mark last outing. I am designing a DIY fan-less diff cooler now.
 

Bahndvr

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Glad we're cool. I felt my comment was a simple statement of fact, but perhaps I could have chosen softer wording. Anyway...

Please discuss with me your oil cooler plan. I think mine (DIY) is the best of them all. It has solved my CHT problem and up to 30min. CHT runs 228F steady, and this is before I put in a RL hood vent (next). See "Track Time limited..." thread, page 30, post #443.

My opinion is that ducting is a lot of work and still won't get your CHT under control. Put in the oil cooler first.

I finally reached diff limit temp at the 30min mark last outing. I am designing a DIY fan-less diff cooler now.
Have you looked at the FluiX rear diff cover?
 

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Don’t we all. No matter how many times I tell myself I’m not there yet.
Lol my inner child really wants aero already but I need coils first to handle the additional load.
 

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Have you looked at the FluiX rear diff cover?
Yes, but my opinion (knowing a little about fin cooling design) is that it won't be very effective. Cooling fins are effective from their 1) area and 2) ambient air conditions (temperature and air flow).

1) There is NO comparison between the fin area of the cover and that of even a small radiator cooler.

2) Air generally does not move when right next to a surface, which is the case for the cover fins. By contrast, the oil cooler is remote from the hot diff and exposed to more turbulent air.

On track, engine oil runs 280F, and so does the gear oil. They both need auxiliary coolers.
 

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Yes, but my opinion (knowing a little about fin cooling design) is that it won't be very effective. Cooling fins are effective from their 1) area and 2) ambient air conditions (temperature and air flow).

1) There is NO comparison between the fin area of the cover and that of even a small radiator cooler.

2) Air generally does not move when right next to a surface, which is the case for the cover fins. By contrast, the oil cooler is remote from the hot diff and exposed to more turbulent air.

On track, engine oil runs 280F, and so does the gear oil. They both need auxiliary coolers.
I wonder why Porsche and BMW run fins?
Something like a FTB kit with radiator and fan?
I know the rear diff gets hot; I've had them barf and blow out the pinion seal.
*Not trying to take over the thread just trying to get edgamecated.
 

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I wonder why Porsche and BMW run fins?
Something like a FTB kit with radiator and fan?
I know the rear diff gets hot; I've had them barf and blow out the pinion seal.
*Not trying to take over the thread just trying to get edgamecated.
Well, Porsche and BMW are much higher price points and that allows them to throw in more trick designs. But I stand by my claims.

I am about to order the parts for my DIY diff cooler kit.
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