Carbon Build-up on Valves on 2.3 Ecoboost

ORRadtech

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 12, 2019
Threads
21
Messages
1,506
Reaction score
1,111
Location
Atlanta, Georgia
First Name
Dave
Vehicle(s)
18 Mustang EcoBoost convertible, 14 Ford Fusion SE
I don't know if they work or not. Seems kinda late at 80k to throw one on now.. If mine ever exhibits symptoms I'll have it walnut blasted and probably try one then.

 
OP
OP

llinthicum1

Active Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2020
Threads
7
Messages
35
Reaction score
22
Location
Harrisburg, Nc
Vehicle(s)
2007 Mustang
The 1.5 Dragon Ecoboost 3 cylinder in the Escape and Bronco Sport has both port and direct injection. And, Ford added Port Injection (with Direct) to the 2.7 and 3.5 V6 engines. I know it will come down to cost, so not sure if Ford will add Port injection to the 2.3, but that sounds like the solution. Maybe for the S650.
 

jdsfly

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 4, 2019
Threads
0
Messages
82
Reaction score
49
Location
Wilmington, DE
First Name
Dave
Vehicle(s)
2018 Mustang Ecoboost, A10
Vehicle Showcase
1
If carbon buildup is a problem on the 2.3 Ecoboost, where are all the cars with problems? Ford says they've resolved the issue, and I've looked across multiple forums, and I could only find one engine with mild carbon buildup. There's a guy on this forum that pulls his intake manifold every 10,000 miles to check for carbon, and he hasn't seen any issues yet. I use Top Tier gas and API SP oil to help prevent carbon buildup and LSPI. If I have any symptoms of carbon buildup, I'll pull the intake manifold and clean the valves, but I don't think it will happen. If an oil catch can gives you peace of mind, go for it, but I don't think it's needed.
 

Shifting_Gears

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2018
Threads
72
Messages
1,871
Reaction score
1,524
Location
South Florida
Vehicle(s)
2016 Mustang GT
Food for thought - you don’t want chunks of carbon breaking off and entering the combustion chamber and ultimately onto the turbo.

Blasting the valves has been the go-to solution. The most common thing you’ll see is walnut shell blasting.

Stating the obvious here, but the intake manifold is removed and the cylinder being blasted obviously needs to have the intake valve closed. The shell media is blasted into the port and it clears the carbon debris off the valve, then all the media is vacuumed out of the intake port. Rinse and repeat for the other cylinders.
 

Coyote Chase

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 18, 2020
Threads
9
Messages
388
Reaction score
142
Location
USA
First Name
Don
Vehicle(s)
2010/2018 Mustang
All direct injection motors will be prob to valve issues, reason is we don’t have port injection spraying fuel on the valves keeping them clean. Catch can will slow down this process a lot but that’s your only defense, STP makes a injection cleaning system that you can get at AUTOZONE and if you check your valves before with a scope and then after you do the proces, the valves are almost perfectly clean. So I do this every 5-6k miles along with my catch can.
Sure. But it wouldn't be illegal to install a factory catch can, or to ditch the direct injection, or to use a combined direct/indirect injection, or to design valves and/or an inlet system that make carbon deposits less likely to form, or whatever - you name it.
I'm sure there are solutions. Sweeping the problem under the carpet isn't one of them.
I just installed an auxiliary fuel system that uses both direct and port injection. I also capped all inlets other than outdoor air into my intake system including the OEM manifold.
It will be interesting to see what condition my valves are in at the end of the summer.
 

ORRadtech

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 12, 2019
Threads
21
Messages
1,506
Reaction score
1,111
Location
Atlanta, Georgia
First Name
Dave
Vehicle(s)
18 Mustang EcoBoost convertible, 14 Ford Fusion SE
Food for thought - you don’t want chunks of carbon breaking off and entering the combustion chamber and ultimately onto the turbo.

Blasting the valves has been the go-to solution. The most common thing you’ll see is walnut shell blasting.

Stating the obvious here, but the intake manifold is removed and the cylinder being blasted obviously needs to have the intake valve closed. The shell media is blasted into the port and it clears the carbon debris off the valve, then all the media is vacuumed out of the intake port. Rinse and repeat for the other cylinders.
If I have to have someone else do it I will look for someone to walnut blasted the valves.
If I decide to try it myself then there are several YouTube videos showing how to do it with small scrapers, brushes, solvent and compressed air. It looks tedious and not as thorough but the cost difference is significant.
 

 
46 - Roush Performance - 3
Top