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Brake Fluid Change?

Jstang23

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Your brakes are your first defense against the stupid drivers of the world, and your cheapest insurance on track. I change every year or sooner, depending on what it looks like. Just look at it, if it’s brown and murky, change it. If it’s a golden yellow semi clear liquid, it’s good :like:
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Hifiguy

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Some HPDE sponsoring groups, including PCA, require proof of a yearly fluid change. For a street car every 2 years should be fine.

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Water is heavier than brake fluid true, but it will not collect near your caliper UNLESS the brake fluid is saturated with water to begin with (after 2-3 years or so) - at which point the water will precipitate out and you will have actual separation.

At least that is my basic chemistry understanding
 

murick

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Just an anecdotal experience from the last week. I went for the annual guarantee check-up (which is mandatory for keeping the Ford guarantee) and they decided to change my brake fluid after two years. I did not argue with them that the Ford specifies it at 3 years, as this was included in already prepaid service plan.

They did change the brake fluid and actually made my brake worse. While before they were perfect, very linear, even the slightest touch on the pedal had very predictable response. Now they are kind of laid back, not very articulate at the beginning of the pedal travel and having not that clear ramp up.

I guess they had to manage to suck some air in while doing it, but I am always a bit upset when my car gets worse after what supposedly should be a regular maintenance.
 

sk47

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Hello; Brake fluid does attract and absorb moisture. I am old so my take may also be old. I flush brake lines on a regular basis 2 years generally. I do not buy into the notion that moisture saturated brake fluid is not an issue. I worked on other folks cars for many years and know some never flush brake fluid. They get away with such for a long time, but not forever.

Decades ago moisture in brake lines caused corrosion. May be the newer lines are not so prone to moisture corrosion. I will continue to flush regardless.

They did change the brake fluid and actually made my brake worse. While before they were perfect, very linear, even the slightest touch on the pedal had very predictable response. Now they are kind of laid back, not very articulate at the beginning of the pedal travel and having not that clear ramp up.
Hello; This is a WAG on my part. A guess is maybe the antilock system is affected. Had an experience two years ago. Had to change out both rear calipers on my pickup. On one side had problems getting the bolt out of the banjo fitting. The brass washer was jammed onto the bolt threads. By the time I got it freed a lot of fluid had leaked out.
Did the job. Did an all-around bleed to get air out. Had a good solid pedal until i started the engine. Then the brakes worked but the pedal did not feel right. I made an appointment to have the antilock flushed/bleed at a shop with the equipment. Was going to be a few days and in the meantime found a way to clear things up myself. I made a thread about that incident on this site.
Some antilock can be bled DIY while other systems need specialized equipment.
 

murick

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I made an appointment to have the antilock flushed/bleed at a shop with the equipment. Was going to be a few days and in the meantime found a way to clear things up myself. I made a thread about that incident on this site.
Some antilock can be bled DIY while other systems need specialized equipment.
I would have hoped that Ford dealership/shop would have a specialized equipment to do it right. Do you have a link to your thread? I would need to figure out how the antilock fits into it first and this may help.
 

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sk47

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Hello; Brake fluid does attract and absorb moisture. I am old so my take may also be old. I flush brake lines on a regular basis 2 years generally. I do not buy into the notion that moisture saturated brake fluid is not an issue. I worked on other folks cars for many years and know some never flush brake fluid. They get away with such for a long time, but not forever.

Decades ago moisture in brake lines caused corrosion. May be the newer lines are not so prone to moisture corrosion. I will continue to flush regardless.


Hello; This is a WAG on my part. A guess is maybe the antilock system is affected. Had an experience two years ago. Had to change out both rear calipers on my pickup. On one side had problems getting the bolt out of the banjo fitting. The brass washer was jammed onto the bolt threads. By the time I got it freed a lot of fluid had leaked out.
Did the job. Did an all-around bleed to get air out. Had a good solid pedal until i started the engine. Then the brakes worked but the pedal did not feel right. I made an appointment to have the antilock flushed/bleed at a shop with the equipment. Was going to be a few days and in the meantime found a way to clear things up myself. I made a thread about that incident on this site.
Some antilock can be bled DIY while other systems need specialized equipment.
There are brake fluid test strips that measure the amount of copper in the brake fluid (Phoenix Systems) and I wondered where the copper came from. I was told that the steel brake lines have an inner liner to prevent corrosion and as the fluid becomes more contaminated from moisture, it begins to cause the inner liner to deteriorate and the amount of degradation shows up as copper. Apparently the industry agrees that this is a great way to test degradation of the brake fluid, but I wondered, wouldn't the copper disappear once the liner is completely gone? Hence if that is the case, the moisture meter would be better, especially if the lining is gone. Moisture is a bad thing to have in a brake system not only because it lowers the fluid boiling point, but it also causes corrosion in many of the metal components, especially critical on many ABS valves, etc.
 

Jstang23

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Just an anecdotal experience from the last week. I went for the annual guarantee check-up (which is mandatory for keeping the Ford guarantee) and they decided to change my brake fluid after two years. I did not argue with them that the Ford specifies it at 3 years, as this was included in already prepaid service plan.

They did change the brake fluid and actually made my brake worse. While before they were perfect, very linear, even the slightest touch on the pedal had very predictable response. Now they are kind of laid back, not very articulate at the beginning of the pedal travel and having not that clear ramp up.

I guess they had to manage to suck some air in while doing it, but I am always a bit upset when my car gets worse after what supposedly should be a regular maintenance.
I've never had ford do a good brake fluid flush. They always manage to get air in the system. I would either take it back and have them fix it or just bleed it the old fashioned way and make sure you don't have air in the system!
 

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Motiv Bleeder. Best investment you'll buy when it comes to doing brake fluid swaps.
 

pozi240

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As they should. I know it varies according to local tracks and what activity on track you are doing (HPDE, open lapping days, race, etc). For most categories on my track here in Ottawa, they want to see some type of confirmation of the brake fluid being changed within the last 3 months (this is for racing or HPDE advanced events), and I've gotten into the habit of doing that in my Mach 1 (as it only comes out in summer, I do two fluid changes a year). Now, my two daily drivers only get done yearly (overkill, I know), as it is very cheap insurance for dependable brake performance and long life of your braking system.

Some HPDE sponsoring groups, including PCA, require proof of a yearly fluid change. For a street car every 2 years should be fine.

1708361033047.png
 

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Ewheels

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Test strips and moisture meters??? Leave it to the Mustang6G community to over-complicate everything.

Street car? - follow owner's manual.
Brakes feel soft? - change the fluid.
Track car? - flush once a year, bleed before every event.
 

Zelek

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So all of the bleeders are essentially the same. What changes is the connection adapter to the master cylinder so you'll want to find one for Ford. I think I originally got mine off Amazon. I bought a Honda adapter later for my Accord and my wife's Insight. I always end up having to look up how to use the thing again because it's not like you change brake fluid often unless you track a car.
 

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Schuvwj

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For me I change/flush the entire brake system every two years.
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