BMR Tech Tip: Clock those bushings after lowering your S550!

Discussion in 'Suspension, Brakes & Chassis' started by BMR Tech, Feb 9, 2016.

  1. Biggsy

    Biggsy Well-Known Member

    First Name:
    Warren
    Vehicle(s):
    '17 GT PP, '02 4Runner
    Joined:
    May 3, 2018
    Location:
    MD
    Posts:
    865
    Likes Received:
    434
    Rating:
    100%
    4   0   0
    I appreciate the response! But I'm already lowered and all that jazz but I'm switching my wheel/tire set up so I just want to know if the bushings have to be done again.
     
  2. Norm Peterson

    Norm Peterson corner barstool sitter

    First Name:
    Norm
    Vehicle(s):
    '08 GT #85, '19 WRX, '01 20AE
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2013
    Location:
    On a corner barstool not too far from I-95
    Posts:
    6,725
    Likes Received:
    2,806
    0   0   0
    Bushings only need to be reclocked when modifications cause a change in the inclinations of any arms or links that use OE bushings. Changing these inclinations without reclocking the bushings prestresses the bushings.

    It doesn't matter what's bolted up to the hubs (big tires, small tires, big steel plates), because that won't change any of the suspension's arm/link inclinations.


    Norm
     
    Biggsy likes this.
  3. BmacIL

    BmacIL Enginerd

    Vehicle(s):
    2015 Guard GT Base, M/T
    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2014
    Location:
    Naperville, IL
    Posts:
    15,025
    Likes Received:
    8,811
    Garage Profiles:
    1
    Rating:
    100%
    3   0   0
    Short answer: no
     
    Biggsy likes this.
  4. Biggsy

    Biggsy Well-Known Member

    First Name:
    Warren
    Vehicle(s):
    '17 GT PP, '02 4Runner
    Joined:
    May 3, 2018
    Location:
    MD
    Posts:
    865
    Likes Received:
    434
    Rating:
    100%
    4   0   0
    Thanks guys. Didn't think so.
     
  5. HeelToeHero

    HeelToeHero Well-Known Member

    Vehicle(s):
    17 GT PP, 05 focus st
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2016
    Location:
    Ontario
    Posts:
    456
    Likes Received:
    114
    0   0   0
  6. BmacIL

    BmacIL Enginerd

    Vehicle(s):
    2015 Guard GT Base, M/T
    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2014
    Location:
    Naperville, IL
    Posts:
    15,025
    Likes Received:
    8,811
    Garage Profiles:
    1
    Rating:
    100%
    3   0   0
    No.
    If you're not backing them all the way out, the threadlock remains intact. None of those bolts are torque-to-yield, so there's no reason not to reuse them. Ford is covering their butt.
     
  7. HoosierDaddy

    HoosierDaddy Well-Known Member

    First Name:
    Randy
    Vehicle(s):
    2016 GT Premium PP and a few others
    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2016
    Location:
    Winchestertonfieldville (ok, Scottsdale), AZ
    Posts:
    5,179
    Likes Received:
    2,751
    Occupation:
    I could tell you but then I'd have to kill you
    Rating:
    100%
    2   0   0
    I take it you are talking about the dry thread-lock on part of the threads from the factory. I did a little research on that and have the impression it is activated by pressure when first tightened which made me wonder if it really still works after loosening. So I have been removing the dry thread-lock and using liquid thread-locker when reusing them which obviously requires them to be completely removed. Would rather not if the dry factory thread-lock is still working. I also wondered about how leaving the dry thread-locker on or using liquid effects how much torque should be used. I mean, the dry thread-locker must have an effect, so reuse or a different thread-locker might change that, although I have been assuming not enough to worry about.
     
  8. BmacIL

    BmacIL Enginerd

    Vehicle(s):
    2015 Guard GT Base, M/T
    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2014
    Location:
    Naperville, IL
    Posts:
    15,025
    Likes Received:
    8,811
    Garage Profiles:
    1
    Rating:
    100%
    3   0   0
    The primary and vast majority of the bolt retention is the stretch of the bolted joint when the bolt is torqued. The dry thread locker just adds some more friction, but a properly torqued bolt is what you need. In addition, the heat from the friction of threading in the joint will reactivate the compound.

    You don't need to worry about new bolts or thread lock when clocking bushings.
     
    HoosierDaddy likes this.
  9. Lowkeyslow

    Lowkeyslow Active Member

    First Name:
    David
    Vehicle(s):
    2019 Mustang GT
    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2019
    Location:
    California
    Posts:
    37
    Likes Received:
    1
    0   0   0
    i know this is a really old post but is there any pics/videos on this people know about? i'm not sure if i got everything!
     
  10. Dominant1

    Dominant1 Well-Known Member

    First Name:
    Dr Frankenstang
    Vehicle(s):
    2016 gt/cs auto 3:55 gears
    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2016
    Location:
    USA
    Posts:
    2,799
    Likes Received:
    635
    0   0   0
    Digital_Synapse likes this.
  11. nrm101

    nrm101 Active Member

    First Name:
    Nathan
    Vehicle(s):
    2019 Mustang GT Premium
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2020
    Location:
    Mass
    Posts:
    28
    Likes Received:
    9
    Garage Profiles:
    1
    0   0   0
    Based on your comment, if you doing a wheel at a time are you suggesting disconnecting the sta-bar completely; Clock, and then reconnect? seems like that would have the desired effect?
     
  12. Norm Peterson

    Norm Peterson corner barstool sitter

    First Name:
    Norm
    Vehicle(s):
    '08 GT #85, '19 WRX, '01 20AE
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2013
    Location:
    On a corner barstool not too far from I-95
    Posts:
    6,725
    Likes Received:
    2,806
    0   0   0
    ^^^ should be better than not disconnecting the bar. Probably not quite as good as disconnecting both bars.


    Norm
     
Loading...

Share This Page