BMR Suspension's New S550 Rear Upper SHOCK MOUNTS: SM760 - Design Finalized!

16s550

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Same thing happen when I got first generation pmas. I got the metal MAF housing then they updated to plastic for less heat soak. It’s just one of those things. That’s why it’s better to be patient sometimes.

I have steeda shock mounts, but I’m curious about trying these now with the updated version.





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Coyote Red

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I've learned my "Lesson" from buying a "New" product, I have the Gen 1 BMR cradlelockouts. When I bought them no mechanic's were familiar or knew how to properly install. Time is your friend, I learned not to "Jump" on new designs quickly. My lockout work fine, now I found a shop to install them correctly with Steeda bushings. Live an Learn.
 

Coyote Red

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Right Norm, I got the Gen 1 CB005 cradlelockouts. No mechenic's had seen them, so it took 2 shops for me to find a proper install, & I had to help show them how. Be careful with "New" products.
 

HoosierDaddy

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Sometimes I wonder about mechanics...

I installed the Gen 1 in early 2016 and I'm not seeing what would be hard about it, other than not knowing how many hours to estimate to charge you for.
Yeah, not a problem for female mechanics. But male mechanics can't show weakness by reading instructions so first times are a bitch.
 

shogun32

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More rigid mounts are risky.
Eh? Clearly coil-overs are what is risky!
/sarc

Why post a pic with ZERO context? Someone was fool enough to put a married-spring coilover with a Steeda mount and reaped the obvious outcome. Likely lowered as well. So let's all blame the shock mounts.
 

KellTrac

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It's true. Use at your own risk. Factory mounts would typically blow out and fail first.

As some companies describe on their product descriptions, basically saying "with some after market shocks destroying factory mounts we came out with this design to hold up"

IE; take out the chassis mounts.
 

StangTime

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Eh? Clearly coil-overs are what is risky!
/sarc

Why post a pic with ZERO context? Someone was fool enough to put a married-spring coilover with a Steeda mount and reaped the obvious outcome. Likely lowered as well. So let's all blame the shock mounts.
It's a air bag suspension. I also don't see any bump stop. Likely he let it slam into the mount everytime he parked.
 

Norm Peterson

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I think I'm seeing a bagged suspension, which in all likelihood was allowed to drop all the way down to 'laying frame'. Bottoming the shock, with that ultimately tearing the mount from the chassis . . . it does look like the holes tore out starting at the bottoms as might be expected . . .


Norm
 

aleccolin

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It's a air bag suspension. I also don't see any bump stop. Likely he let it slam into the mount everytime he parked.
I think I'm seeing a bagged suspension, which in all likelihood was allowed to drop all the way down to 'laying frame'. Bottoming the shock, with that ultimately tearing the mount from the chassis . . . it does look like the holes tore out starting at the bottoms as might be expected . . .

Norm
Need more info. Could be a jounce bumper under the shock bellows. Also given the height of the spacer above that bag, it's possible it would sit on the bag before bottoming on the shock. In fact, the biggest reason to change to a threaded body shock like that is to be able to adjust the length so you can air out the bags without bottoming out the shock. Not to say that was done correctly, but that would be the idea.

That said, clearly the failure mode when upgrading to rigid shock mounts becomes the body instead of the mount. I stand by my return to the OE mounts.

Honestly, I don't know what you guys are talking about, but after changing to the FRPP shocks with a corretcly trimmed jounce bumper and raising my suspension about 10mm in the rear, I don't get ANY discernible "PP bounce". Still on the Steeda adjustable spring set in the rear, switched to BMR up front because the early production Steeda progressives I had were way too low.
 

Roadway 5.0

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I stand by my return to the OE mounts...after changing to the FRPP shocks with a correctly trimmed jounce bumper and raising my suspension about 10mm in the rear, I don't get ANY discernible "PP bounce".
+1...except with Bilsteins.
 

GT 550

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I don't believe Steeda has tested or cleared its mounts for airbag applications, so IMHO a failure of this type can't be attributed to the mounting system as it was being used outside its intended purpose. Maybe the shocks weren't correctly adjusted for length and the inflating airbag also pulled the mount downwards before pushing it upwards in full deflation. Looking at the airbag at full droop and assuming the shock shaft is fully extended, given the amount of travel that seems to be available I'd say there's at least a chance the latter applies. Determining the cause of failures such as this is just conjecture without context and measurement/data. I could post a pic of a ruptured xyz damper but not mention it was damaged by high explosive.

Still, always interesting to car guys. @KellTrac appreciate seeing this, did the FB post by chance have any explanation?
 

Norm Peterson

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that would be nice in billet alum....
The shock mount?

Unlike steel, aluminum does not have what's known as an "endurance limit", that being a stress level below which an infinite number of loading cycles can be applied to it. IOW, depending on how they are loaded, aluminum components are far more susceptible to fatigue failure. Definitely the wrong material here, given that shocks are constantly in motion, perhaps several hundred cycles in every mile traveled.


Norm
 

shogun32

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the actual problem is piss-poor design by Ford that is weak to begin and which limits are easily exceeded by aftermarket solutions which didn't take into account the weakness of the design. A couple guages thicker steel and a 'roofed' mount (bolts mount vertical) would have been able to sustain vastly higher loadings. I wouldn't be surprised if Ford just duplicated the S197 and didn't actually think about what they were doing.
 

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