Anyone trade their GT350R for a Cayman GT4?

WItoTX

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In my mind it's simple. I love seeing big fat American cars slap around germans on the track. The GT350 can do this with the right driver day after day. And it's not gawdy like the GT500 when it does it.

So yes, you might have to move some hoses to get at the clutch, or the oil filter hole isn't exactly where you want it, or like me, you fingers are too fat so you enlist your two year old to get a screw that has fallen into a crevice, but you can do all this stuff yourself, with a set of wrenches, some jack stands, and someone to hold the light.

Or conversely, you drive your car to the dealer, and get a $13,000 bill two weeks later when the tech has gone through every aspect of your car because the TPMS monitor turned on. You decide how much overhead you want with the car.

But that GT4 is cool. I would love to take one for a spin!

 

BierGut

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If I may give you the perspective of a person who has owned GT350 (74,500 miles), C7 ZR1 (18,000 miles) and a 991.2 GT3RS (9,500 miles):

- American cars here are very unrefined. This is both a good thing. Good in a sense that they feel very classic, almost like the days of those Saturn V rockets in the Apollo program, but its a bad thing that from NVH to interior fit and finish to things like oil filter being very hard to get access in the GT350. You look at the american cars and you are reminded that they are all about value and that means cost cutting everywhere.

- You look at the Porsche and the precision both interior, exterior, and underbody is immense. You remove the GT3RS bumper 1,000 times and it will go back the same way with no sag, none of that “the bumper flexes and the clear coat is chipped away”. The car is made to be serviced. Every little detail has been carefully thought through. Removing the engine and transaxle as one piece can be done as short as 30 minutes and can be put back right away. Try doing a clutch replacement of the corvette or the mustang. It is a fucking disaster. Every time you attempt, its like doing open heart surgery. You have to remove the exhaust, then the driveshaft, then you have the subframe then you have all the wiggling of hoses and brake lines in the way. When you get under these cars and work on them, then you realize Germans are just not cutting corners. I bet Americans could do it just as good but then it wouldn’t be $60,000 GT350 or $140,000 ZR1 would it? This is what most people forget and miss entirely. You… get… what…. You…. Pay… for. Period.

- Then there is the fun aspect. American cars have substantially more straight line performance. You are not going to get the thrust of the vodoo from the 414 hp 8k rpm N/A. Not even close. You may come close with my GT3RS but if power is you thing, just forget about it. In curvy roads, I am 2-3 mph faster in my 520 hp gt3rs than my 755 hp ZR1. When curvy roads is my thing, porsche it is. So much balance. So much pace, and so consistent. But when i m on a highway or long stretches of road, porsche does get boring. The 2-3-4th gear WOT run of a ZR1 is faster than a 737 taking off. Its impossible not to smile ear to ear.

- The aftermarket for Porsche is at a level that isnt even close to aftermarket for american cars. You are not going to find youtube videos of rock music playing in the background and $1,500 for a full exhaust. The headers and exhaust on my GT3RS costs $13,000. The customer service, quality of the product, performance of the product are just unparalleled. Made in USA, USA engineers and welders. Not mom and pop shop in Florida welding T304, its 321SS. On a 500 hp/337 ft lbs car, it indeed ads 40tlbs and 30 hp. It isnt “porsche tax”. It is just better. I’ll even say that how much better the aftermarket for Porsche is much more than the actual car being better than the mustang/corvette. I dealt with aftermarket companies that were just plain awful. Like walmart customer service.

- Of all the cars I have owned, GT3RS is abused the most. I have times that i kept that car at 8000-9000 rpm for over a mile and a half. I have done launch controls 11 times in a row and I have pushed that car to its limits. I cannot get the oil temp to above 198F and water temp to above 203F. It has not burned an ounce of oil, not a tea spoon (and oil monitor is precise to 200ml increments) and oil reports are as clean as drinking water. Literally no metals. Want me to tell you about my piston slap or typewriter tick of my GT350? That it drinks a quart of oil every 1,000 miles. My lead levels have been high last 30,000 miles. ZR1 drinks oil too, on average 1 qt per 1,200 miles. It has a transmission leak. Coolant leak. Basically every kind of fluid leaks/burnt. I turn off rev matching in the ZR1 and heel and toe above 4k rpm and in as little as 20 miles, it consumes 1/8th of a quart of oil. If I drive it like most corvette owners below 3k rpm, oil consumption is nil. But redlining it or throttle decel just kills it. Tells you so much about tolerances. GT350 is much worse. It uses so much oil when driven the same way, I havent driven it like that in 2 years in fear of it dying on me.

- Even given the above. I like my american cars because I like the heritage and the history behind them. I love them for what they are which is why GT3RS isnt a replacement but an addition. The sound GT350 makes on a cold winter night in a forest with that V8 echoing just gives me goosebumps. It is one of those things that I can never let go, no matter how much oil it uses and how much piston slap it has every morning.

I would try to find a way to own both cars.They are so different that if you loved the R, you will miss it. If you hated it, you wont but then you would have sold it by now wouldnt you?

Let me know if you have any specific questions.
THIS! In every aspect.
 

stanglife

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This is the final generation of internal combustion before the 718 platform goes fully electric. My hunch is this will keep waitlists long and prices high as enthusiasts jump in for their final chance of buying the “last hurrah” of traditional 718 architecture.
Any talk about building the GT4 along side of the EV 718? I could see that happening for a while.
 

fpa1974

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- You look at the Porsche and the precision both interior, exterior, and underbody is immense. You remove the GT3RS bumper 1,000 times and it will go back the same way with no sag, none of that “the bumper flexes and the clear coat is chipped away”. The car is made to be serviced. Every little detail has been carefully thought through. Removing the engine and transaxle as one piece can be done as short as 30 minutes and can be put back right away. Try doing a clutch replacement of the corvette or the mustang. It is a fucking disaster. Every time you attempt, its like doing open heart surgery. You have to remove the exhaust, then the driveshaft, then you have the subframe then you have all the wiggling of hoses and brake lines in the way. When you get under these cars and work on them, then you realize Germans are just not cutting corners. I bet Americans could do it just as good but then it wouldn’t be $60,000 GT350 or $140,000 ZR1 would it? This is what most people forget and miss entirely. You… get… what…. You…. Pay… for. Period.
Funny you say that. It definitely resonates :) I remember first time I had to get under the 350 to do some minor work. I was amazed at how bad I messed my hands up (scratches, nicks etc). I know I should wear gloves more often but doing the same on my 20 year old BMW (made in USA no less :) ) is a night and day difference. No rough metal parts with rust straight from showroom, no sharp edges, everything is coated and properly finished etc. The thought process and attention to details is just on a completely different level. And we are talking 20 years apart.

I still love my 350 for what it is though. I am ok with it. I am planning on driving it for a long time to come.
 

WItoTX

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Has everyone forgot that back in '14 the gt3's tended to catch on fire and we're recalled for the issue? That the Taycans currently have a problem with catching fire? To That the early 2000s 911 leaked oil prematurely? That the cayman has numerous issues that required costly maintenance (ims and clutch were the two big ones I recall)?

Heck I have one track buddy whose 996 911 caught fire at the track (and I've gotten ear fulls the last 6 months about 5 volt and 12 volt systems in the same wiring loom). Another buddy has his car in the shop now for $18k worth of repairs.

These aren't one off issues. And there seems to be engineering gaps with the Germans too.

I'm not trying to claim a GT350 is any better. But I think some look to the Germans with blinders on.
 

ZX3ST

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Has everyone forgot that back in '14 the gt3's tended to catch on fire and we're recalled for the issue? That the Taycans currently have a problem with catching fire? To That the early 2000s 911 leaked oil prematurely? That the cayman has numerous issues that required costly maintenance (ims and clutch were the two big ones I recall)?

Heck I have one track buddy whose 996 911 caught fire at the track (and I've gotten ear fulls the last 6 months about 5 volt and 12 volt systems in the same wiring loom). Another buddy has his car in the shop now for $18k worth of repairs.

These aren't one off issues. And there seems to be engineering gaps with the Germans too.

I'm not trying to claim a GT350 is any better. But I think some look to the Germans with blinders on.
Yep. The strut tower failure was a big one. Porsche basically told people to go pound sand, fix it yourself. There goes 20k+.
 

SchnellGT350

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They did replace my perfectly good transmission under the recall though (although it took them a long time to own up to that issue). Maybe the towers will be addressed in the future
 

UnhandledException

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In my mind it's simple. I love seeing big fat American cars slap around germans on the track. The GT350 can do this with the right driver day after day. And it's not gawdy like the GT500 when it does it.

So yes, you might have to move some hoses to get at the clutch, or the oil filter hole isn't exactly where you want it, or like me, you fingers are too fat so you enlist your two year old to get a screw that has fallen into a crevice, but you can do all this stuff yourself, with a set of wrenches, some jack stands, and someone to hold the light.

Or conversely, you drive your car to the dealer, and get a $13,000 bill two weeks later when the tech has gone through every aspect of your car because the TPMS monitor turned on. You decide how much overhead you want with the car.

But that GT4 is cool. I would love to take one for a spin!
I do my maintenance on every car myself, including GT3RS. The Ford dealer wanted $2750 for replacing the pads of my GT350. They asked $300 for oil change. $400 for alignment. Not really that cheap. Porsche is by far the easiest car to work on. It requires very little maintenance (oil, engine filter, plugs, brake fluid). $13,000 figure is what costs to buy an aftermarket header to muffler system from Dundon. Not what dealer charges to do repairs.
Has everyone forgot that back in '14 the gt3's tended to catch on fire and we're recalled for the issue? That the Taycans currently have a problem with catching fire? To That the early 2000s 911 leaked oil prematurely? That the cayman has numerous issues that required costly maintenance (ims and clutch were the two big ones I recall)?

Heck I have one track buddy whose 996 911 caught fire at the track (and I've gotten ear fulls the last 6 months about 5 volt and 12 volt systems in the same wiring loom). Another buddy has his car in the shop now for $18k worth of repairs.

These aren't one off issues. And there seems to be engineering gaps with the Germans too.

I'm not trying to claim a GT350 is any better. But I think some look to the Germans with blinders on.
Thats actually a great point you bring up as its also an example of how the performance branch of a sports car company handles the failures when there are some:

- All cars had their engines replaced no questions asked.
- Multi month payment compensation as well as extended warranty perks on top.
- Then Porsche executives agree to meet owners in Atlanta for a private meeting where they agree to their mistake and provide a 10 year 120,000 mile engine warranty
- They then subsequently develop 2 engines in parallel. 1) The 2014 engine with DLC modifications and 2) An entirely new engine with solid lifters that now serves in 991.2 and 992 GT3s.
- And on top of all of this, you have chief GT engineer publicly admit to this “mistake we made” during an interview.

Tell me now how does Ford handle similar cases or Corvette?
 

Tonymustang302

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And lettuce not forget any aftermarket mods done at the porsche dealer keeps the factory warranty.

Also porsche has 20 warranty issues within warranty for 10,000 vehicles…next closest to that is mercedes with 200-300/10,000 i think.
 
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car crazy

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I think I have a unique perspective on this because I just sold my 2017 GT350 for a 2021 GT4. I purchased my GT350 new in late 2016. I never tracked it but I loved the car and I'm lucky enough to have twisty back roads around me. I'll miss the GT350 sound for sure. I have a lot of HDPE track days under my belt though they were not in the GT350 or the GT4. I've not been to the track in many years (since I had kids). While I'm no pro driver, I can drive, I do know how to drive. I generally did about 4 to 6 HDPE full weekend events per year for about 10 years.

Shifter - I love the GT350 manual but the GT4 manual is significantly better. Everything from the feel, to the throws, to the clutch is faster to use, more precise, and feels better. Rev matching is WAY easier in the GT4 and shifts feel a lot more precise. Driving them back to back, the GT350 manual somehow feels sloppy and imprecise. This is my impression after driving each about 100 miles over a couple of days. I tried the autoblip feature of the GT4 for a short amount of time. I never thought I'd use it and doubt I'd use it regularly but I have to admit it is sort of fun.

Suspension - No contest here. Not even in the same class IMO. The GT350 felt big and drove big. The front suspension of the GT350 is great but the rear always felt unsettled to me. Certain imperfections in the pavement made the rear "bounce" and become unsettled. The GT4 is always locked in. The suspension feels less stiff but yet the car turns more flat and I have yet to feel that unsettled, "I'm not sure what this thing is going to do", feeling that drove me nuts about the GT350. Some people may like that, I did not. The behavior reminded me of my first car in high school which was a 1978 olds cutlass supreme. Ford did something slightly wrong with the rear suspension IMO. I don't know if the spring rate was too stiff or the dampening was off. Something never felt right to me about the rear end. I did like the challenge of driving it but not when it became unpredictable. I'm not talking about applying too much throttle and the rear getting loose. I love the challenge of squeezing on the throttle a little at a time to optimize traction. That was fun. I'm talking about general bouncing that happens even when driving straight but it is far worse when it happens in a corner.

Brakes - Porsche brakes have a fantastic feel but the GT350 is a very close second. I have the PCCB so it may not be a fair comparison.

Engine - Interestingly, they feel very similar when applying power out of a corner or when applying power from a stop. Similar feel even in a straight line. Similar red lines, both naturally aspirated, etc. The GT4 does not have the vibration of the GT350. It does vibrate but not like he GT350. I don't miss the vibration over 6k RPM. I never loved that. It felt like something was going to shake loose. I know it will not but it felt like it. The GT4 sound is nothing like the GT350. They are not even in the same ballpark. I'll likely need to do something to the exhaust to get a little more sound out of the GT4. I'm going to start by removing the vacuum lines to keep the valves open. When the valves open, (around 4k RPM) the sound of the GT4 is great. Even you you push the "loud" button, the exhaust valves stay closed until 4k RPM or so, varies by gear). Again, GT350 is the clear winner here.

Interior - These cars are in a different price category so this is likely not fair. I'm one of the few who really likely the GT350 interior. I don't think it felt cheap as many seem to assert. The GT4 interior is a nicer place, no doubt, but not massively nicer. If you pay extra to Porsche for upgraded seats, stitching, upgraded materials, the GT4 will be a way nicer place but it comes at a cost. Comparing base to base, there is not much of a difference in my opinion. I'm sure I'll get flamed for saying that. They are both pretty analog interiors by todays standards. I upgraded the interior of the GT4 a bit and I do love the upgrades. It does make it feel nicer. Without those, there is not much of a difference.

Exterior - No contest. Ford panel lines, misaligned doors and body panels, bumper gaps, etc are ridiculous. Porsche does no such thing - you get German precision as opposed to 1/2 hearted attempts at building a car by a bunch of people who clearly have no pride in their jobs and just don't care. I convinced myself it was part of the GT350 charm but it drove me nuts. I will say Porsche has a lot of orange peel in their paint. Likely too much to remove by detailing. They need to get on top of that.

The GT4 feels smaller and drives smaller. The weight difference is massively apparent. I'm not a muscle car guy, I'm a sports car guy and the GT350 was more of a sports car but it was a heavy one. I liked it, I even loved it but I much prefer the GT4. I'm also intrigued by the Lotus Evora GT and the new Emira if that tells you anything. Many here would likely never look at those cars. I did put money down on a C8 Z06 but I'm about 4 to 5 years out on the waiting list. I'm even worried that car is too big for me. I don't love big cars. I could care less about brands. I'm not brand centric at all. I don't care about American vs European vs Japanese, etc. I do tend to switch cars fairly frequently and the GT350 held my attention for the second longest amount of time I've ever had any car. Now that I'm onto the GT4, I wish I would have done it sooner. I'll likely keep the GT4 a long time. Love the car.

GT4.jpg
 
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dsm_mikey

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I think I have a unique perspective on this because I just sold my 2017 GT350 for a 2021 GT4. I purchased my GT350 new in late 2016. I never tracked it but I loved the car and I'm lucky enough to have twisty back roads around me. I'll miss the GT350 sound for sure. I have a lot of HDPE track days under my belt though they were not in the GT350 or the GT4. I've not been to the track in many years (since I had kids). While I'm no pro driver, I can drive, I do know how to drive. I generally did about 4 to 6 HDPE full weekend events per year for about 10 years.

Shifter - I love the GT350 manual but the GT4 manual is significantly better. Everything from the feel, to the throws, to the clutch is faster to use, more precise, and feels better. Rev matching is WAY easier in the GT4 and shifts feel a lot more precise. Driving them back to back, the GT350 manual somehow feels sloppy and imprecise. This is my impression after driving each about 100 miles over a couple of days. I tried the autoblip feature of the GT4 for a short amount of time. I never thought I'd use it and doubt I'd use it regularly but I have to admit it is sort of fun.

Suspension - No contest here. Not even in the same class IMO. The GT350 felt big and drove big. The front suspension of the GT350 is great but the rear always felt unsettled to me. Certain imperfections in the pavement made the rear "bounce" and become unsettled. The GT4 is always locked in. The suspension feels less stiff but yet the car turns more flat and I have yet to feel that unsettled, "I'm not sure what this thing is going to do", feeling that drove me nuts about the GT350. Some people may like that, I did not. The behavior reminded me of my first car in high school which was a 1978 olds cutlass supreme. Ford did something slightly wrong with the rear suspension IMO. I don't know if the spring rate was too stiff or the dampening was off. Something never felt right to me about the rear end. I did like the challenge of driving it but not when it became unpredictable. I'm not talking about applying too much throttle and the rear getting loose. I love the challenge of squeezing on the throttle a little at a time to optimize traction. That was fun. I'm talking about general bouncing that happens even when driving straight but it is far worse when it happens in a corner.

Brakes - Porsche brakes have a fantastic feel but the GT350 is a very close second. I have the PCCB so it may not be a fair comparison.

Engine - Interestingly, they feel very similar when applying power out of a corner or when applying power from a stop. Similar feel even in a straight line. Similar red lines, both naturally aspirated, etc. The GT4 does not have the vibration of the GT350. It does vibrate but not like he GT350. I don't miss the vibration over 6k RPM. I never loved that. It felt like something was going to shake loose. I know it will not but it felt like it. The GT4 sound is nothing like the GT350. They are not even in the same ballpark. I'll likely need to do something to the exhaust to get a little more sound out of the GT4. I'm going to start by removing the vacuum lines to keep the valves open. When the valves open, (around 4k RPM) the sound of the GT4 is great. Even you you push the "loud" button, the exhaust valves stay closed until 4k RPM or so, varies by gear). Again, GT350 is the clear winner here.

Interior - These cars are in a different price category so this is likely not fair. I'm one of the few who really likely the GT350 interior. I don't think it felt cheap as many seem to assert. The GT4 interior is a nicer place, no doubt, but not massively nicer. If you pay extra to Porsche for upgraded seats, stitching, upgraded materials, the GT4 will be a way nicer place but it comes at a cost. Comparing base to base, there is not much of a difference in my opinion. I'm sure I'll get flamed for saying that. They are both pretty analog interiors by todays standards. I upgraded the interior of the GT4 a bit and I do love the upgrades. It does make it feel nicer. Without those, there is not much of a difference.

Exterior - No contest. Ford panel lines, misaligned doors and body panels, bumper gaps, etc are ridiculous. Porsche does no such thing - you get German precision as opposed to 1/2 hearted attempts at building a car by a bunch of people who clearly have no pride in their jobs and just don't care. I convinced myself it was part of the GT350 charm but it drove me nuts. I will say Porsche has a lot of orange peel in their paint. Likely too much to remove by detailing. They need to get on top of that.

The GT4 feels smaller and drives smaller. The weight difference is massively apparent. I'm not a muscle car guy, I'm a sports car guy and the GT350 was more of a sports car but it was a heavy one. I liked it, I even loved it but I much prefer the GT4. I'm also intrigued by the Lotus Evora GT and the new Emira if that tells you anything. Many here would likely never look at those cars. I did put money down on a C8 Z06 but I'm about 4 to 5 years out on the waiting list. I'm even worried that car is too big for me. I don't love big cars. I could care less about brands. I'm not brand centric at all. I don't care about American vs European vs Japanese, etc. I do tend to switch cars fairly frequently and the GT350 held my attention for the second longest amount of time I've ever had any car. Now that I'm onto the GT4, I wish I would have done it sooner. I'll likely keep the GT4 a long time. Love the car.

GT4.jpg
Thank you! I was looking for this experience as a reference.

I appreciate everyone's feedback!
 

velocity550

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If you can and are some how able to get in touch with a gt4 RS do that!! That car will go down in history and will likely hold its value. But I feel like it would be almost impossible to get one unless you know someone at Porsche. Go big or go home! I think they are PDK only tho :(
 

matthewr87

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I considered some Porsche models when shopping for the GT350. Growing up I liked 911s just as much as Mustangs. But when I reached a point in my life when I could afford a Porsche I quickly realized I am not a "Porsche guy". I was imbued with an uncomfortable feeling when walking into the dealerships and speaking with the salespeople. There is some kind of aura around Porsche and other high-end brands that discomfits me. I cannot adequately describe it. So now I admire them from afar at track days while enjoying my GT350.
 

BierGut

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I think I have a unique perspective on this because I just sold my 2017 GT350 for a 2021 GT4. I purchased my GT350 new in late 2016. I never tracked it but I loved the car and I'm lucky enough to have twisty back roads around me. I'll miss the GT350 sound for sure. I have a lot of HDPE track days under my belt though they were not in the GT350 or the GT4. I've not been to the track in many years (since I had kids). While I'm no pro driver, I can drive, I do know how to drive. I generally did about 4 to 6 HDPE full weekend events per year for about 10 years.

Shifter - I love the GT350 manual but the GT4 manual is significantly better. Everything from the feel, to the throws, to the clutch is faster to use, more precise, and feels better. Rev matching is WAY easier in the GT4 and shifts feel a lot more precise. Driving them back to back, the GT350 manual somehow feels sloppy and imprecise. This is my impression after driving each about 100 miles over a couple of days. I tried the autoblip feature of the GT4 for a short amount of time. I never thought I'd use it and doubt I'd use it regularly but I have to admit it is sort of fun.

Suspension - No contest here. Not even in the same class IMO. The GT350 felt big and drove big. The front suspension of the GT350 is great but the rear always felt unsettled to me. Certain imperfections in the pavement made the rear "bounce" and become unsettled. The GT4 is always locked in. The suspension feels less stiff but yet the car turns more flat and I have yet to feel that unsettled, "I'm not sure what this thing is going to do", feeling that drove me nuts about the GT350. Some people may like that, I did not. The behavior reminded me of my first car in high school which was a 1978 olds cutlass supreme. Ford did something slightly wrong with the rear suspension IMO. I don't know if the spring rate was too stiff or the dampening was off. Something never felt right to me about the rear end. I did like the challenge of driving it but not when it became unpredictable. I'm not talking about applying too much throttle and the rear getting loose. I love the challenge of squeezing on the throttle a little at a time to optimize traction. That was fun. I'm talking about general bouncing that happens even when driving straight but it is far worse when it happens in a corner.

Brakes - Porsche brakes have a fantastic feel but the GT350 is a very close second. I have the PCCB so it may not be a fair comparison.

Engine - Interestingly, they feel very similar when applying power out of a corner or when applying power from a stop. Similar feel even in a straight line. Similar red lines, both naturally aspirated, etc. The GT4 does not have the vibration of the GT350. It does vibrate but not like he GT350. I don't miss the vibration over 6k RPM. I never loved that. It felt like something was going to shake loose. I know it will not but it felt like it. The GT4 sound is nothing like the GT350. They are not even in the same ballpark. I'll likely need to do something to the exhaust to get a little more sound out of the GT4. I'm going to start by removing the vacuum lines to keep the valves open. When the valves open, (around 4k RPM) the sound of the GT4 is great. Even you you push the "loud" button, the exhaust valves stay closed until 4k RPM or so, varies by gear). Again, GT350 is the clear winner here.

Interior - These cars are in a different price category so this is likely not fair. I'm one of the few who really likely the GT350 interior. I don't think it felt cheap as many seem to assert. The GT4 interior is a nicer place, no doubt, but not massively nicer. If you pay extra to Porsche for upgraded seats, stitching, upgraded materials, the GT4 will be a way nicer place but it comes at a cost. Comparing base to base, there is not much of a difference in my opinion. I'm sure I'll get flamed for saying that. They are both pretty analog interiors by todays standards. I upgraded the interior of the GT4 a bit and I do love the upgrades. It does make it feel nicer. Without those, there is not much of a difference.

Exterior - No contest. Ford panel lines, misaligned doors and body panels, bumper gaps, etc are ridiculous. Porsche does no such thing - you get German precision as opposed to 1/2 hearted attempts at building a car by a bunch of people who clearly have no pride in their jobs and just don't care. I convinced myself it was part of the GT350 charm but it drove me nuts. I will say Porsche has a lot of orange peel in their paint. Likely too much to remove by detailing. They need to get on top of that.

The GT4 feels smaller and drives smaller. The weight difference is massively apparent. I'm not a muscle car guy, I'm a sports car guy and the GT350 was more of a sports car but it was a heavy one. I liked it, I even loved it but I much prefer the GT4. I'm also intrigued by the Lotus Evora GT and the new Emira if that tells you anything. Many here would likely never look at those cars. I did put money down on a C8 Z06 but I'm about 4 to 5 years out on the waiting list. I'm even worried that car is too big for me. I don't love big cars. I could care less about brands. I'm not brand centric at all. I don't care about American vs European vs Japanese, etc. I do tend to switch cars fairly frequently and the GT350 held my attention for the second longest amount of time I've ever had any car. Now that I'm onto the GT4, I wish I would have done it sooner. I'll likely keep the GT4 a long time. Love the car.

GT4.jpg
Well, you certainly bought the right car for you. Enjoy.

a. A 101k base MSRP vs 55k base MSRP really shouldn't be compared.
b. Technology from 2017 and 2021 really shouldn't be compared.
c. Sports cars = laps times. Maybe compare 2021 GT500 and a 2021 GT4??

Quality of fitment & panels, etc? Refer to a.
Feel of gear boxes, rev matching, etc? Refer to b.

I love Porsches and have owned many and am a 30 year PCA member, but I never understood taking a thoroughbred to a rodeo or a Quarter Horse to a stakes race -- neither would do very well.
 

 
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