7th Generation Mustang (S650) Moved to 2022...

King_V

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Electrify the Mustang, it is no longer a Mustang.
Why?

What if it made the Mustang faster? Say, Tesla's Ludicrous Speed level of fast?





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edco

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Why?

What if it made the Mustang faster? Say, Tesla's Ludicrous Speed level of fast?
Part of the success of Mustang is affordability. Tesla (imo and wallet) is not affordable.
In 1988 one could spend $8500 on an HO 5.0 Notchback Mustang and run with cars costing $50K.
Don't know about every State, in MO, CA and IN the Highway patrols bought them by the 100s.
They were fast pursuit vehicles and they usually got who they were chasing.
California CHP ran a special on track driving school for the model.
The car world to some degree is always engrossed with extremes and superlatives.
Dodge for example; the 700 HP Hellcat was not enough, they had to top it with an 800 HP Demon.
Ford is me too with GT500 for 2020.
The $1M Buggatti Veyron was not enough they needed a $1.7M deluxe variant. On and on.

For many the Mustang created something hard to find, affordable performance,
head turning looks, a car that is about what we like about cars.
Superlatives and extremes can change that.
 
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King_V

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Part of the success of Mustang is affordability. Tesla (imo and wallet) is not affordable.
In 1988 one could spend $8500 on an HO 5.0 Notchback Mustang and run with cars costing $50K.
Don't know about every State, in MO, CA and IN the Highway patrols bought them by the 100s.
They were fast pursuit vehicles and they usually got who they were chasing.
California CHP ran a special on track driving school for the model.
The car world to some degree is always engrossed with extremes and superlatives.
Dodge for example; the 700 HP Hellcat was not enough, they had to top it with an 800 HP Demon.
Ford is me too with GT500 for 2020.
The $1M Buggatti Veyron was not enough they needed a $1.7M deluxe variant. On and on.

For many the Mustang created something hard to find, affordable performance,
head turning looks, a car that is about what we like about cars.
Superlatives and extremes can change that.
Might need to check up on those 1988 prices there...

https://www.cjponyparts.com/resources/mustang-prices-through-the-years#1988

And, the Corvette could be had starting at $30K. The Firebird Formula 350 was $14,500. The 1987 Buick Grand National was a little over $16K. So, you didn't need anything close to $50K back then to equal or exceed the Mustang HO 5.0.


But, ok, instead of Ludicrous speed - what if an electric version is faster than any of their non-high-priced vehicles. Say, notably faster than a base GT, but with around GT pricing? I think assuming any electric Mustang that's fast must by definition have a Tesla Model S price tag is a false assumption.
 

edco

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Might need to check up on those 1988 prices there...

https://www.cjponyparts.com/resources/mustang-prices-through-the-years#1988

And, the Corvette could be had starting at $30K. The Firebird Formula 350 was $14,500. The 1987 Buick Grand National was a little over $16K. So, you didn't need anything close to $50K back then to equal or exceed the Mustang HO 5.0.


But, ok, instead of Ludicrous speed - what if an electric version is faster than any of their non-high-priced vehicles. Say, notably faster than a base GT, but with around GT pricing? I think assuming any electric Mustang that's fast must by definition have a Tesla Model S price tag is a false assumption.
Good points and good memory. You kind of backup my point about affordable performance being part of the Mustang thing. In the world of the $30K, $14.5K and $16K great American muscle cars you name, $8.5K in stock trim put a guy in the game with an HO 5.0 Mustang and nothing else did that. Throw in $6K of after market to equal the Firebird price tag and you had a respectable street machine. As for the future, I can see Ford relaunching the T-Bird badge as their hybrid electric sport performance hi-tech 2 door coupe with Tesla level interior. I just want Mustang to stay what it has been. But maybe I am a disappearing breed of car enthusiast.
 
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edco

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Another reply off and slightly on topic. Looking at the 2020 Corvette I see a 2017 Ford GT from the rear quarter views, some GT in the front, and plenty of GT in the steering wheel dash. If it were not for Ford GM would not know what to build. That said, the new Corvette looks terrific and also draws plenty form McLaren. Here comes the extremes, 0-60 mph in 3 seconds. While I guess that is the trend, it moves the industry away from a lot of buyers. I hope Ford,
needing to play in the extremes game, continues to offer a Mustang that reaches at least 100,000 units per year. Camaro is at 51,000 units. I think part of that is because they focused on high performance high end content and the higher price walked away from a lot of traditional Camaro buyers.
The V6 AT Mustang at $24k (gone in 2017) is an example of what I mean. For the price the car is a great balance of performance style and affordability.
Whatever mustang gen 7 is, I hope it is still a car with the balance stated above.
 
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King_V

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Good points and good memory. You kind of backup my point about affordable performance being part of the Mustang thing. In the world of the $30K, $14.5K and $16K great American muscle cars you name, $8.5K in stock trim put a guy in the game with an HO 5.0 Mustang and nothing else did that. Throw in $6K of after market to equal the Firebird price tag and you had a respectable street machine. As for the future, I can see Ford relaunching the T-Bird badge as their hybrid electric sport performance hi-tech 2 door coupe with Tesla level interior. I just want Mustang to stay what it has been. But maybe I am a disappearing breed of car enthusiast.

To be fair, memory nothing, LOL - my memory's a cobwebby mess, I had to do some online searching, just on a vague sort of "wait, I know it's been a while, but those numbers don't quite sound right, maybe?" thought.

And, as a guy who used to say "electric is crap" and "I'd never use traction/stability control", well, I'm changing my tune. After all, in my day, 200-250 HP was about the best you could get at a reasonable price (Formula 350, Mustang 5.0, Grand National). The first time I really leaned on my 2015, I realized exactly how much progress had been made, what 435 horsepower and gobs of torque really meant, and decided "Yeah, traction/stability control is going to stay ON, thank you very much."

I was also skeptical of electric motors, but, while my Prius is interesting and quiet, hearing about how full-electrics can perform, and even a video from Jay Leno talking about how the torque is right there from a dead stop and how they're going to outdo the gasoline engine in racing, well, I stared reality in the face.

Reality stared back. And I was the one that blinked.

I love V8s - the power, and the visceral feeling from the sound. But I know electrics are going to outdo them, and simplify the car in the process. I'll miss the sound, though.

I wouldn't be entirely surprised if Ford tried to design for both possibilities, though a car that can be gasoline-only, hybrid, or electric-only. After all, think of the plethora of engine options that were sometimes offered in the Mustang's early-ish days (late 60s to maybe 1971). Six-bangers to various small blocks, and a few big block options. Even later, 4cyl, turbo-4, 6-cyl and 8-cyl.

I'm pretty confident that the Mustang will keep its essence. I am SURE they won't try another misguided Probe-will-be-the-new-Mustang misstep. Multiple tiers of performance for multiple price categories. Similar to how you can go today with base model, GT, Bullitt, GT350, GT500.
 

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C8 for you then :wink:

Mustang needs to stick to the recipe that has worked so well for 55 years. A great looking 2+2 with good trunk space, good performance and an affordable price. Mustang's relative practicality is what has made is such a strong seller :like:
 

edco

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Might need to check up on those 1988 prices there...

https://www.cjponyparts.com/resources/mustang-prices-through-the-years#1988

And, the Corvette could be had starting at $30K. The Firebird Formula 350 was $14,500. The 1987 Buick Grand National was a little over $16K. So, you didn't need anything close to $50K back then to equal or exceed the Mustang HO 5.0.


But, ok, instead of Ludicrous speed - what if an electric version is faster than any of their non-high-priced vehicles. Say, notably faster than a base GT, but with around GT pricing? I think assuming any electric Mustang that's fast must by definition have a Tesla Model S price tag is a false assumption.
My oversight, never looked at your web link. It is the last word on prices. Maybe it was 1986. Guys were buying this 5.0 Mustang MT, from Sinclair Ford, stripped down model, may not have had AC, and tearing up Lindbergh Blvd. I did not price one, Just repeating what my foggy memory heard back then, $8500. Sales are not always at the sticker price.
I did not mean to imply you needed $50K to equal a Mustang 5.0. It is the other way around. The Mustang could run with
some, not many, of the cars that cost $50K.
 

LSchicago

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SVTSNAKE355

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They did with the gen5 camaro and they continued it with the gen6 but retro is dead at least poorly done retro. They should have moved on to a new camaro like Mustang changed from the s197 to the s550 then everyone wouldn't be crying because camaro has been put on indefinite {canceled} hold.
The Crapmaro is done. :cwl:
 

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So, are we skipping S650 and going straight to S750 as the codename for the 7th Gen Mustang?

Taken from a Q&A with a Mach E Electric Vehicle Engineer:

https://www.macheforum.com/site/thr...th-ford-mach-e-electric-vehicle-engineer.360/

"Q: Does this mean the Mustang is going to be a crossover from now on?

Answer:
Nope, the new generation Mustang coupe is in development, actually! Going to be a special one, too.....

......because of the Mach-E we get to keep the S750 program."
 

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