3D printing TB & Plenum Spacers??

It'sCowBurger

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Hey, all. I searched the forum for this question and could not find it so I will ask.

I was looking at the Boomba Racing inc throttle body and intake plenum spacers and thought "wow, those mid-range power gains would be fantastic for my build.". Then I saw the price... About $300 for 2 pieces of aluminum..... As someone with a CAD license, I could easily draw one up and have a local shop CNC it for half the price, but, I was thinking:

Why are we not just 3D printing these for $10?
- The temperatures around at the intake plenum should not get past 190 and at the throttle body would be even lower. Nylon, ABS, etc., would be good at a minimum of 230 degrees.
- These are not load bearing members so strength is not a problem. Although 3D printed parts can be very strong.
- The surface texture would not be as smooth, but that is actually what you want on an intake (too smooth is bad).
- DIY gasket material can be purchased at Autzoone for a few dollars. I have used it before, good stuff.

Has anyone tried this? Am I missing something?

Thanks,
There is no ham in hamburgers...
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Saxgod

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I like the idea but I would be worried about the plastic degrading after multiple heat cycles and the risk of a piece coming off and getting eaten. It is plastic so it may not damage anything but that’s All I can think of. If you need someone to print for you I’d love to do it. Have a nice Prusa collecting dust from a lack of project ;)
 

Strokerswild

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I would worry about porosity and consequent vacuum leaks.

Even though they look solid, 3D printed parts aren't always so. Flatness of mating surfaces might be sketchy too regardless of using an OEM gasket/seal.

Try it and see, it's the only way to find out!
 

Konamoth

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I would worry about porosity and consequent vacuum leaks.

Even though they look solid, 3D printed parts aren't always so. Flatness of mating surfaces might be sketchy too regardless of using an OEM gasket/seal.

Try it and see, it's the only way to find out!
If designed and printed right, it should hold air just fine. I've seen printed parts hold vacuum plenty of times in maker projects. Definitely would want gasket/seals to be sure everything's tight around the joins though, yes.

As Saxgod said, I'd be wary of temperature cycles—and forbidding it, a shard or blob of plastic getting sucked down the intake manifold more than anything.
 
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