2062 to 2087 Oil Pressure

huskeee

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The flow HB is talking about is in regards to the flow abilities of the filter, not the flow abilities of the oiling system. If the filter has a higher flow rating to it, it will most likely increase pressure post filter depending on the abilities of the next restriction in order to maintain the flow abilities of the oiling system. The overall flow will continue to remain inline with the flow of the pump however. In this case, and in my experience of using the updated filter, the pressure did increase, therefore the filter flows more and the pressure increased between the filter and the next restriction in the system (unsure which bearings are next), however the overall flow should be the same.

This reminds of removing the thermostats back in the day. Guys used to (and still do) add restrictors to the thermostat housing as they were overheating, and this was thought to 'slow the coolant down' as it went through the radiator. Really, the restrictor was increasing pressure in the block(which is what the thermostat was doing) and thus increasing the boiling point. Flow either side of the restrictor remains the same.





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DrumReaper

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Just for us inquiring minds, how is viscosity constant when heat changes viscosity?
 

huskeee

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Just for us inquiring minds, how is viscosity constant when heat changes viscosity?
I believe galaxy meant (and I'll let him clarify) that the oil viscosity is a constant in regards to it being a known before the oil filter change, not that it is a constant viscosity regarding various temps.

Viscosity obvisouly changes over temp as you pointed out, however the flow doesn't, which is why oil pressures will be higher when cold.
 

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From page 30 of the 2020 GT350 supplement -

Note: Use only a Motorcraft FL-2087 oil
filter for maximum performance, reliability
and durability.

Note:The use of any oil filter other than the
dealer supplied oil filter may cause engine
damage.

See the Engine Oil Check section in the
Maintenance chapter of your Owner's
Manual for information on checking the
engine oil.

Also
 
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galaxy

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Just for us inquiring minds, how is viscosity constant when heat changes viscosity?
I believe galaxy meant (and I'll let him clarify) that the oil viscosity is a constant in regards to it being a known before the oil filter change, not that it is a constant viscosity regarding various temps.
Most correct sir.
 
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RockyRidge

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I don’t recall specifically, but I’m FAIRLY certain oil pressure is measured on the way back into the engine, so higher pressures would mean that it flows better not worse.
If that was the case, 2087 would allow for a higher flow right? However, from the looks of it, I would assume that as Galaxy says, to keep the flow up, the oil pressure increases.

Does anyone know how much oil the oil pump is supposed to pump per minute or second at what rpm?
 

honeybadger

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That’s not how a fluid system works. In this case, the oil pump and the oil viscosity are constants; i.e., we didn’t change them. An oil pump creates flow, it does not create pressure. Pressure is created by resistance to this flow in the form of bearing clearances, etc — restrictions. The pressure would/should be the same anywhere in the pressurized system, regardless of where the measurement is taken. Again, in our scenario in this engine, the only thing that would cause an increase in pressure — with everything else that affects pressure remaining the same — would be a change in restriction. (This is why an arbitrary statement that higher pressure is better isn’t a safe one. An increase in pressure on an established engine is every bit an indicator of a malfunction as a decrease in pressure) And since we know we didn’t change the pump, the oil [viscosity], or any other restriction that would affect pressure, this is all it could be. Just as the inverse is true; a worn engine with increasing clearances will cause a decrease in oil pressure. And in your argument, a higher flowing filter should/would actually result in no pressure change since the pressure would be established by the most restrictive points in the clearances already. Arguably variable since we now know the filter influences that.
Except that oil pressure is measured after it’s gone through the filter in this situation. The oil filter will absolutely affect that. When I built my custom remote oil filter and cooling system there were 5 iterations to get it right. Early versions were too restrictive or too long. I saw pressures change each time I made changes to the system.

a common practice for serious race cars is to measure oil pressure twice. Once coming out of the block and once going back in. This way we can see how much all of the external lines, filters, and coolers are restricting oil flow. And what you do in the system will affect the difference between those numbers.

Regarding higher oil pressure being bad, I mean I guess you’re right? But I’ve never seen an engine have higher measured oil pressure and an issue? Failing bearings, spun bearings, blockages, etc. all result in low oil pressure. I can’t think of anything bad that would show you high oil pressure on the gauge. In theory a change that suddenly results in more oil pressures seems concerning, but in practice I can’t think of anything.

My intention with the statement was to let folks know they don’t need to be worried about seeing high oil pressures on startup/cold/rpm, but that they should be watching for oil pressure drops.
 

honeybadger

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Just for us inquiring minds, how is viscosity constant when heat changes viscosity?
also important to note that oil viscosity will change a bit as it wears. So a well used oil will have slightly lower viscosity, which could also contribute. But hopefully no one is running their oil long enough for that to matter.
 

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