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2020+ Shelby GT500's DCT... Is this legit?

motivology

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This morning, I was on a Shelby GT500 Facebook group and came across this post that I never heard of before regarding DCT. The original post was a guy who had his 2020 GT500 transmission blew with 3000 miles on the clock. Obviously covered under warranty.

I am not well educated on DCT (I understand just the basics) or the mechanics of DCT so I'd like to learn if this is legit from current GT500 owners? This is the link the Charlie referenced: https://www.cjponyparts.com/resourc...HxL2fVizpJHGN3PYoVplB1Dw1PulGTt09r9GQxoIuGkBw

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EFI

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Legit yes, as it does slip the clutch in slow moving scenarios. However I very much doubt that type of behavior is what caused the poster's engine to blow in 3,000 miles. First of all, it wouldn't just blow up...it would just wear out the main clutch. Secondly, it will take alot more than 3,000 miles to do so. Manual drivers do this quite often, especially new ones, but those don't blow up all over the place after only a few thousand miles.

I learned to drive manual on my 2015 MT82 and rode the piss out of that clutch for months while I was getting the hang of it. After 31,000 miles it was still working very well.
 

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I've read of same: that it's best to either be at a complete stop or driving.

Creeping along and rubber-necking on a consistent basis is not welcome. Any DCT. Any manufacturer.
 
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motivology

motivology

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Legit yes, as it does slip the clutch in slow moving scenarios. However I very much doubt that type of behavior is what caused the poster's engine to blow in 3,000 miles. First of all, it wouldn't just blow up...it would just wear out the main clutch. Secondly, it will take alot more than 3,000 miles to do so. Manual drivers do this quite often, especially new ones, but those don't blow up all over the place after only a few thousand miles.

I learned to drive manual on my 2015 MT82 and rode the piss out of that clutch for months while I was getting the hang of it. After 31,000 miles it was still working very well.
I doubt it's what blew the transmission too, but the guy made a comment about it - even the owner of the car didn't know.

I've driven a handful of manual mustangs and never had an issue. But was definitely curious about DCT as I am considering getting a 2020+ GT500 some time down the road.


I've read of same: that it's best to either be at a complete stop or driving.

Creeping along and rubber-necking on a consistent basis is not welcome. Any DCT. Any manufacturer.
That's what the article said, just thought it's an interesting comment about DCT. Good thing I rarely creep from a stop light or stop sign when I drive a manual Mustang.
 

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At a standstill with your foot on the brake, the clutches are disengaged. The clutches start to bite as soon as you take your foot off the brake and at around 8mph in 1st gear, they are fully engaged. Any speed under that and they are slipping. Can help alleviate it some during slow traffic situations by pulling both the paddles which forces the transmission into neutral and disengages the clutches. When you have enough room in front of you, let off and get back to a minimum of 8mph.
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