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2016 GT350 burning a quart every 300-400miles

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malfere2

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Do you mind sharing at what mileage after the initial test did the care start burning a quart every 350 miles?
Approx. 27K the car started to burn closer to 350miles.
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malfere2

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This is not totally accurate. There are many factors that go into what a dealership gets paid on warranty.
Can you embellish on this comment. What are the other factors? Just curious on the overall process.
 

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I am getting ready to enroll into the oil consumption test world too. Have about 25,000 miles and it seems to eat more oil now than previously. I added 3/4 quarts to make it slightly above the half way mark. Drove about 70 miles for a Cars and Coffee run and when I checked, it was slightly below halfway. The dealer is making arrangements so I just have to wait for the call to get registered for this test. Otherwise, the engine performs very well and excellent oil pressure. Thank goodness for extended warranties.
 

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malfere2

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So a quick updated. Dealership says it's normal again. I topped off my oil and it looks as though it went 300miles for a full quart. They are supposed to bring some sort of engineer to look at it, but will have to wait for a call from the dealership. Really frustrating because it's definitely burning more than a quart every 500miles.
 

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If it's burning that much oil but is otherwise running fine there is probably a problem with your valve seals. The dealer can easily scope the engine and determine if that is the problem. It doesn't take an engineer from Ford to figure it out. And if the engine needs to be replaced a competent tech can do it in a day if they work only on your car.
 

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If it's burning that much oil but is otherwise running fine there is probably a problem with your valve seals. The dealer can easily scope the engine and determine if that is the problem. It doesn't take an engineer from Ford to figure it out. And if the engine needs to be replaced a competent tech can do it in a day if they work only on your car.
thinking out loud here...but if it was just valve seals, why wouldn’t Ford just replace them instead of The whole dam engine?
 

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People saying it's not normal but this is the main topic OF the voodoo engine and everyone reports about the same. Every 250-500 miles, they have to add a quart. Obviously it's blow by but I've heard true experts say that the engines are setup loose from the factory on purpose because looser engines rev more freely and make more power. The question is how bad can it really get. 100 miles? 75?
 

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People saying it's not normal but this is the main topic OF the voodoo engine and everyone reports about the same. Every 250-500 miles, they have to add a quart. Obviously it's blow by but I've heard true experts say that the engines are setup loose from the factory on purpose because looser engines rev more freely and make more power. The question is how bad can it really get. 100 miles? 75?
Hello; Several decades ago I had a ten year old four door 57 Chevy. After the straight six went bad I replaced it with a 283 V8. After two serious rear end collisions I junked the car (yeah I know in hindsight what a dumb move that was) I gave the engine to a friend because I did not have any place to keep the car or any other parts. He built the V8 to run on a dirt track just outside of Tazewell TN. He built it "loose" to make more power.
After the front U joint broke on the track and he went flipping end over end, he retired his race car. He took the V8 and put it into a mid 60's Chevelle. He had to keep a case of oil in the trunk as it did burn a lot of oil. It made good power with a big two barrel carb, but was built loose to reduce friction.
I did some research on the V8 in a 2019 F-150 I was thinking of buying. Turns out in 2018 Ford started lining the cylinder walls using the plasma arc method either the same or very similar to the way the GT350 cylinders are lined. The F-150 V8's are reported to be using excessive amounts of oil. I paid attention to this when I found a TSB from Ford about this. They essentially reduced the vacuum during deceleration by changing the programing of the throttle body so it does not close all the way, thus allowing a way for air to be sucked in that way and not past the rings or valve seals. They also said to expect the oil consumption to improve as miles accumulated, maybe 10,000 miles plus.

Your engine has plenty enough miles to have seated the rings even with the hard plasma lining. Usually the two areas I think about are the rings and the valve stem seals. Maybe the PCV system if your engine has that. A PCV valve is a quick and cheap thing to change.

I get that you still have some warranty and will be wise to see if Ford will take care of the issue.
Good luck

PS: This is very off topic. In a recent season Ferrari was running pretty strong at first. They were also blowing some oil smoke and using oil. Of course the details were not made public so I am guessing. At a point Ferrari was fined and had to do something about the engines. They stopped blowing so much smoke but also were not competitive any more. I have figured they were burning some oil to make extra power or to extend the fuel range. TheF1 cars are allowed to burn only so much fuel in a race so they have to use computer programs to keep from running out. They could turn the fuel all the way up to make more power but would run out in a normal race. If the burning oil could allow then to extend the range, then they could keep the power turned up for longer periods. They got caught I guess.
 
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malfere2

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thinking out loud here...but if it was just valve seals, why wouldn’t Ford just replace them instead of The whole dam engine?
[/QUOTE
Hello; Several decades ago I had a ten year old four door 57 Chevy. After the straight six went bad I replaced it with a 283 V8. After two serious rear end collisions I junked the car (yeah I know in hindsight what a dumb move that was) I gave the engine to a friend because I did not have any place to keep the car or any other parts. He built the V8 to run on a dirt track just outside of Tazewell TN. He built it "loose" to make more power.
After the front U joint broke on the track and he went flipping end over end, he retired his race car. He took the V8 and put it into a mid 60's Chevelle. He had to keep a case of oil in the trunk as it did burn a lot of oil. It made good power with a big two barrel carb, but was built loose to reduce friction.
I did some research on the V8 in a 2019 F-150 I was thinking of buying. Turns out in 2018 Ford started lining the cylinder walls using the plasma arc method either the same or very similar to the way the GT350 cylinders are lined. The F-150 V8's are reported to be using excessive amounts of oil. I paid attention to this when I found a TSB from Ford about this. They essentially reduced the vacuum during deceleration by changing the programing of the throttle body so it does not close all the way, thus allowing a way for air to be sucked in that way and not past the rings or valve seals. They also said to expect the oil consumption to improve as miles accumulated, maybe 10,000 miles plus.

Your engine has plenty enough miles to have seated the rings even with the hard plasma lining. Usually the two areas I think about are the rings and the valve stem seals. Maybe the PCV system if your engine has that. A PCV valve is a quick and cheap thing to change.

I get that you still have some warranty and will be wise to see if Ford will take care of the issue.
Good luck

PS: This is very off topic. In a recent season Ferrari was running pretty strong at first. They were also blowing some oil smoke and using oil. Of course the details were not made public so I am guessing. At a point Ferrari was fined and had to do something about the engines. They stopped blowing so much smoke but also were not competitive any more. I have figured they were burning some oil to make extra power or to extend the fuel range. TheF1 cars are allowed to burn only so much fuel in a race so they have to use computer programs to keep from running out. They could turn the fuel all the way up to make more power but would run out in a normal race. If the burning oil could allow then to extend the range, then they could keep the power turned up for longer periods. They got caught I guess.

This is more or less the Master Tech's explanation on why I am burning oil. I can actually live with it as I've owned a rotary motor in the past and am used to checking my oil often. In fact when I did my first oil consumption test I was burning about a quart every 500 miles. They even pointed it out in the manual so I was ok with it and let is go. Now that its increased in oil consumption I am concerned. Again it could be normal, but I'm not driving the car hard and I am getting about 1 quart every 350 miles. On a side note I may change the PCV valves on the car. Doesn't hurt to see what happens.
 

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thinking out loud here...but if it was just valve seals, why wouldn’t Ford just replace them instead of The whole dam engine?
You'd have to ask Ford that question. My 2017 was going through about 1 quart every 300-350 miles after doing the mandated testing. Dealership scoped the engine and determined bad valve seals on at least one cylinder as they could see oil running down the inside of cylinder wall and pooling on the top of the piston. Ford would only authorize complete engine replacement, not a fix of the seals. When new engine arrived after a couple of weeks, and right before my scheduled appointment date, the dealership had the old engine pulled and new one installed in a day. They kept the car an extra day to check it after sitting and make sure no leaks etc. Car was basically out of commission for only 2 days. My dealership was right on top of the diagnosis and the engine replacement.
 

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Hello; Not that this is needed since the OP's car is still under powertrain warranty but non invasive ways to check is to do a compression test and a compressed air test. I also guess a camera in the spark plug hole might be possible?
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